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BLZ

English translation: transit number

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13:34 Nov 22, 2001
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
Bus/Financial
German term or phrase: BLZ
XXXX Bank, Filiale in XXXX, BLZ: 123 456 78, Konto-Nr. 1234567
vit drowning
English translation:transit number
Explanation:
= Bankleitzahl

or 'bank code no.' in the UK

ref: Schäfer, WIrtschaftsWB
Selected response from:

Ken Cox
Local time: 10:16
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +6transit numberKen Cox
5 +3bank routing number
Dr. Fred Thomson
5 +3sort code
AngieD
4 +4German bank sorting code (BLZ)
Ralf Lemster
5 +1(German) Bank Identifier CodeDietrich Herrmann, MD, PhD, MBA
1German Bank Code (Number)Dan McCrosky


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
transit number


Explanation:
= Bankleitzahl

or 'bank code no.' in the UK

ref: Schäfer, WIrtschaftsWB

Ken Cox
Local time: 10:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 5905

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Claudia Tomaschek
1 min

agree  Sheila Hardie: yes, I'd say bank code no.:)
3 mins

agree  Ursula Peter-Czichi
7 mins

agree  cochrum: AE: bank routing number - same thing
12 mins

agree  Ingrid Grzeszik
20 mins

agree  Thijs van Dorssen: Cochrum is right. I always use routing # on my intl. invoices. Money always arrives. Hi NC, LFTCU in Jan in WI!
54 mins
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
German bank sorting code (BLZ)


Explanation:
You should definitely add the German abbreviation (if not 'Bankleitzahl') to clarify that you're referring to the German sorting code (as opposed to the UK one, for example).


    Own experience in financial markets
Ralf Lemster
Germany
Local time: 10:16
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 2684

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  RWSTranslation
9 mins

agree  Uschi (Ursula) Walke
24 mins

agree  Steffen Pollex: yes, this will put it more clearly...
9 hrs

agree  Krokodil: Definitely!
4 days
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
sort code


Explanation:
In the UK we talk about
branch sort code
or
branch sortcode

The following links show examples from two banks.
I agree with Ralf that you should include BLZ.


    Reference: http://www.lloydstsb.com/contacts/branch_locator/0,1006,gene...
    Reference: http://www.natwest.co.uk/scripts/framesearch.asp?/bus_rbs/sb...
AngieD
Local time: 10:16
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 348

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Judith Schmid
8 hrs

agree  Karin Walker
12 hrs

agree  xxxpaulagee: It might be safer to use bank sort code
18 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
(German) Bank Identifier Code


Explanation:
Folks, it has all been standardized and better men (in banking circles it is mostly men) have racked their brains to come up with BIC. See the reference below; it is so exhaustive it made my poor li'l head spin.


    Reference: http://www.zahlungsverkehrsfragen.de/azvframe.html
Dietrich Herrmann, MD, PhD, MBA
Germany
Local time: 10:16
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 350

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Thijs van Dorssen: Hi Didi, tnx for the good link! Just wot I was lookin' 4!
1 hr
  -> Oh my God, how did you know my nickname (;-)
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
bank routing number


Explanation:
This is what we call it in the States.
I always translate it this way. I have done so for years and have hear nary a murmur.

20 years a translator + 20 yrs a lawyer

Of course the German is Bankleitzahl.

Dr. Fred Thomson
United States
Local time: 02:16
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 5861

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kevin Fulton: This is the common term in the US, sometimes also bank routing and transit number
1 hr

agree  Martin Schneekloth
17 hrs

agree  Kathryn Partlan
17 hrs
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
German Bank Code (Number)


Explanation:
I don't know if you are asking because you have received an invoice from someone in Germany of if you are a translator.

If you have to translate the term, we might be getting ourselves into trouble by trying to be too specific. Looking at Didi's reference, we can see that the BIC is not the same as the BLZ. It will probably lead you to the same bank but it is not the same number.

http://www.zahlungsverkehrsfragen.de/frameset.html

"Jeder SWIFT-Teilnehmer hat eine eindeutige Kennung, den sogenannten BIC (Bank Identifier Code). Dieser hat 8 oder 11 Stellen und ist wie folgt aufgebaut:

bank code
4 Stellen Alphazeichen frei gewählt (Bundesbank z.B. MARK)

country code
2 Stellen Alphazeichen, ISO-Code des Landes (in Deutschland also DE)
location code

2 Stellen alphanumerisch zur Ortsangabe (z.B. FF für Frankfurt)
branch code

wahlweise 3 Stellen alphanumerisch zur Bezeichnung von Filialen"

Another part of the problem is the number of different English names for BLZ, such as "routing code", "transit number", "bank code (number)", "bank identification number", "bank number", "sorting code", "routing symbol", all coming up somewhere in Hamblock/Wessels – Großwörterbuch Wirtschaftsenglisch, Zahn – Wörterbuch Bank- und Börsenwesen, Reinhart von Eichborn – Der kleine Eichborn, and Romain – Wörterbuch der Rechts- und Wirtschaftssprache.

If you are sure your translation will only be read in only one English language country, a Google search with "Bankleitzahl" in the domain for that country might give you the correct translation for that country's readers. For example, this site indicated that the New Zealand translation might be "sort-code" or "sort code" as shown at this .nz domain site:

http://www.google.com/search?q=cache:RWxXpKvrVxA:www.anthrop...

The exact term "sort-code" did not turn up in any dictionary and the above text originated in Switzerland. A further search for "sort code" and .nz did however yield some authoritative hits indicating that the term in New Zealand may indeed be "sort code". Similar detective work might give you exactly the right term for your readership.

Otherwise, a more general and explanatory translation, such as "German Bank Code (Number)" or similar might be less dangerous than arbitrarily picking one of the above terms.

HTH

Dan


Dan McCrosky
Local time: 10:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1541
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