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Bedarfseinlastung; Barkasse

English translation: see below

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20:45 Apr 13, 2000
German to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial
German term or phrase: Bedarfseinlastung; Barkasse
Unfortunately I can't offer much in the way of context, other than that the terms in question appear in sections of a flowchart related to purchasing parts and materials for production.

"Bedarfseinlastungen und Erstellung des Vertriebsplans"
And at the end of the flowchart: "Auszahlung Barkasse"

Thanks in advance for any help.
Cami Townsend
English translation:see below
Explanation:
"Bedarfseinlastungen" doesn't show up in any of my four normally reliable econ/business dictionaries nor in Yahoo (Germany) / AltaVista / Northern Light. "einlasten" or "Einlastung" also seem to be non-words, even in Duden. Buuuuuuut, the trick is SAP! "einlast" gets many search engine hits, usually in connection with SAP. According to the SAPTerm dictionary, "einlasten" is SAPanese for the verb "to dispatch" but is not to be used for "einplanen" and "Einlastung" is SAPanese for "dispatching" but is not to be used for "EINPLANUNG". As "dispatching" in the usual (non-SAPanese) English sense of "shipment/shipping" sounds strange in your context, I might use "the assignment of material requirements/requisitions (to a particular work station and/or supplier)".

"Barkasse" can mean "cash" or "petty cash" but in your context "cash (meaning payments/disbursements) department". I would not take the "bar" part too seriously here. It is hard to believe they pay everything in cash so it might be safer for you to just translate it with "disbursements department payment" or simply "payment". Germans sometimes say "Barscheck" = "open cheque" or "Barüberweisung" = "cash transfer/remittance" also although the words sound self-contradictory, they just mean the recipient can get cash for the instruments.
Selected response from:

Dan McCrosky
Local time: 17:41
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
nasee belowDan McCrosky
naStocking and setting up a distribution planProtradit
naDispatching of demand, cash paymentAntje Ruppert


  

Answers


20 mins
Dispatching of demand, cash payment


Explanation:
I found "dispatching of backlog" for Rückstandseinlastung in my glossary. Barkasse usually just means "cash".

Antje

Antje Ruppert
United States
Local time: 11:41
PRO pts in pair: 73
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3 hrs
Stocking and setting up a distribution plan


Explanation:
Payout for a barge? Barkasse is a type of boat. Bar [maybe with a space] Kasse? Bar is cash money; Kasse is the cash account. Just a guess. I have no idea what that is

Protradit
Local time: 08:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 195
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4 hrs
see below


Explanation:
"Bedarfseinlastungen" doesn't show up in any of my four normally reliable econ/business dictionaries nor in Yahoo (Germany) / AltaVista / Northern Light. "einlasten" or "Einlastung" also seem to be non-words, even in Duden. Buuuuuuut, the trick is SAP! "einlast" gets many search engine hits, usually in connection with SAP. According to the SAPTerm dictionary, "einlasten" is SAPanese for the verb "to dispatch" but is not to be used for "einplanen" and "Einlastung" is SAPanese for "dispatching" but is not to be used for "EINPLANUNG". As "dispatching" in the usual (non-SAPanese) English sense of "shipment/shipping" sounds strange in your context, I might use "the assignment of material requirements/requisitions (to a particular work station and/or supplier)".

"Barkasse" can mean "cash" or "petty cash" but in your context "cash (meaning payments/disbursements) department". I would not take the "bar" part too seriously here. It is hard to believe they pay everything in cash so it might be safer for you to just translate it with "disbursements department payment" or simply "payment". Germans sometimes say "Barscheck" = "open cheque" or "Barüberweisung" = "cash transfer/remittance" also although the words sound self-contradictory, they just mean the recipient can get cash for the instruments.


Dan McCrosky
Local time: 17:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1541
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