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Schere auseinander gehen

English translation: Average prices have continued to rise/fall

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Schere auseinander gehen
English translation:Average prices have continued to rise/fall
Entered by: Gillian Searl
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

13:19 Jun 12, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial
German term or phrase: Schere auseinander gehen
Firma XX hat in den ersten drei Monaten dieses Jahres bei Monitoren, PC-Systemen und Servern deutlich zugelegt. Auf der anderen Seite ging im Vergleich zur Vorperiode die Schere bei den Durchschnittspreisen noch weiter auseinander.
Gillian Searl
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:33
Usually
Explanation:
"Schere" indicates a gap between two groups/categories etc:

"Schere zwischen Arm und Reich wird immer größer..."

Here, all they seem to be saying is that average prices have risen since the previous period, but the idea of using "Schere" is to suggest that this rise part of a continuous process, emphasise by the "noch weiter": so I would say something like:

"Average prices have continued to rise compared to the prevous period.."

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-12 13:47:02 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"this rise *is*...\"

*emphasised*
Selected response from:

John Bowden
Local time: 22:33
Grading comment
Thanks John - though actually the prices fell rather than rose but yours read the best.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1average prices fluctuated still more widely, zig-zagged even more stronglyuparis
4 +2the gap widened
Alison Schwitzgebel
5The divide grew ever widerRowan Morrell
4UsuallyJohn Bowden


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
The divide grew ever wider


Explanation:
According to my Collins dictionary, "Schere" can mean "divide" in a figurative sense, and I believe they're driving at something like that here. The divide between prices of the current period and the previous period grew ever wider. Something along those lines.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-12 13:33:31 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The \"ever\" covers the \"noch\", I think.

Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 09:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1459
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
the gap widened


Explanation:
gap is often a good translation of "schere", and I think it would work here.

HTH

Alison

Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 23:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 3409

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cécile Kellermayr
1 min

agree  Rowan Morrell: Not bad at all.
4 mins
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
average prices fluctuated still more widely, zig-zagged even more strongly


Explanation:
I understand here that the "range" (low/high) grew wider.
First option more "earnest", second option (my favourite) more "jazzy".

uparis
Local time: 23:33
PRO pts in pair: 32

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Renate FitzRoy
6 mins
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26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Usually


Explanation:
"Schere" indicates a gap between two groups/categories etc:

"Schere zwischen Arm und Reich wird immer größer..."

Here, all they seem to be saying is that average prices have risen since the previous period, but the idea of using "Schere" is to suggest that this rise part of a continuous process, emphasise by the "noch weiter": so I would say something like:

"Average prices have continued to rise compared to the prevous period.."

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-12 13:47:02 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"this rise *is*...\"

*emphasised*


    Reference: http://www.taz.de/pt/2001/10/05/a0044.nf/text
John Bowden
Local time: 22:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 511
Grading comment
Thanks John - though actually the prices fell rather than rose but yours read the best.
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