KudoZ home » German to English » Bus/Financial

Mietgegenstand

English translation: rental premises

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Mietgegenstand
English translation:rental premises
Entered by: Alexander Schleber
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

14:09 Dec 3, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial
German term or phrase: Mietgegenstand
A term frequently used in a rental contract.

What would be the correct translation in USA English.

"rental object" gets so few hits on Google that I think there must be a better and confirmed term.

TIA
Alexander Schleber
Belgium
Local time: 18:48
Subject premises/leased premises
Explanation:
...is what I usually use, depending on context. "Subject premises" can be used for "Mietgegenstand" when referred to in the same sense as "Vertragsgegenstand", for example, or "leased premises can be used in a more general sense.

You can find lots of examples of this on the web (like the one below); mostly they seem to be using "subject premises" and "leased premises" more or less interchangeably.
Selected response from:

Susan Starling
Spain
Local time: 12:48
Grading comment
Thanks to all of you for the many well-considered replies.
All of your answers were food for thought and, alas, I have to make a decision.
a) I didn't like "lease" in the context, because it is too close to car leasing, which has a different meaning.
b) I didn't like "property" either, though I had seriously considered it, because property is real estate or some other item of ownership.
c) The word "premises" avoids those pitfalls and fits excellently, IMO. Thanks for that one Susan.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +5leased/rented propertyxxxIanW
4 +3Subject premises/leased premises
Susan Starling
4 +3rental property
Kim Metzger
5 +1lease object / leased object
swisstell
5equipment for hireEdward Guyver


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
rental property


Explanation:
That's what I usually use.

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 11:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 21840

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lori Dendy-Molz: Could be rental or rented. Depends on context.
1 hr
  -> Residential Rental Property: Real property, such as houses or apartment complexes, rented primarily for use as dwelling units. http://moneycentral.msn.com/taxes/glossary/glossary.asp?Term...

agree  Michele Johnson
3 hrs

agree  Renate FitzRoy
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
leased/rented property


Explanation:
I would go for "leased property" of "rented property". (Source: Hamblock and Wessels)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 mins (2003-12-03 14:12:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Another alternative would be \"leased object\" (Romain legal dictionary)

xxxIanW
Local time: 18:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2468

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lori Dendy-Molz
1 hr

agree  Hilary Davies Shelby: it just means the property that is the subject of the rental contract
2 hrs

agree  swisstell: see my comments to your "objection" - below - and of course I meant to say "one does NOT necessarely see ...."
2 hrs
  -> No problem - I'll call off the hit ...

agree  William Stein
10 hrs

agree  shabda
19 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
equipment for hire


Explanation:
This is English (British) terminology and I used it frequently over the last thirty years when I was involved in the rental industry in Germany. An alternative expression would be "rental equipment".

Edward Guyver
Local time: 17:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 247
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
lease object / leased object


Explanation:
just replace rent with lease (nobody seems to talk of rental any longer in the US) and you will find thousands of Google hits

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 18:48
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 3377

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  gangels
1 hr
  -> thanks, Klaus

neutral  xxxIanW: Yes, but I did say "leased object" as an addition to my original answer
1 hr
  -> sorry, Ian, so you did. As you know, with this new format one does necessarely see the input of others (and if so, I only read headlines, hardly ever the small print where this was hidden)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Subject premises/leased premises


Explanation:
...is what I usually use, depending on context. "Subject premises" can be used for "Mietgegenstand" when referred to in the same sense as "Vertragsgegenstand", for example, or "leased premises can be used in a more general sense.

You can find lots of examples of this on the web (like the one below); mostly they seem to be using "subject premises" and "leased premises" more or less interchangeably.


    Reference: http://www.apartmentswauseon.com/mainpages/GeneralLease.htm
Susan Starling
Spain
Local time: 12:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 167
Grading comment
Thanks to all of you for the many well-considered replies.
All of your answers were food for thought and, alas, I have to make a decision.
a) I didn't like "lease" in the context, because it is too close to car leasing, which has a different meaning.
b) I didn't like "property" either, though I had seriously considered it, because property is real estate or some other item of ownership.
c) The word "premises" avoids those pitfalls and fits excellently, IMO. Thanks for that one Susan.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  izy
9 mins

agree  ezbounty@aol.co
2 hrs

agree  Kim Metzger: Hi Susan. Good to hear from you again. This sounds like a good solution for a contract.
3 hrs
  -> Hi Kim, and thanks!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search