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NN or N.N. = Nomen Nominandum (Nescio)

English translation: TBA

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23:36 Jul 14, 2000
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
Bus/Financial
German term or phrase: NN or N.N. = Nomen Nominandum (Nescio)
This is used on an organization chart to show that nobody has been appointed to the position yet. I need a short, preferably well-known, widely used English abbreviation because the audience will not all be proficient in either German or English. Do we also use NN in English, or perhaps nyn (not yet named)? I could not get any worthwhile English search engine hits for NN or nyn, but the search engines do not always work well with short abbreviations. I can only think of A.N.Other, which is not classy enough as well as being too long. Thanks in advance.
Dan McCrosky
Local time: 15:38
English translation:TBA
Explanation:
What about To Be Announced?
Selected response from:

Laura Gentili
Italy
Local time: 15:38
Grading comment
I do not really like this answer, but I used it because the customer is one of those nuts who firstly refuses to believe that anything could be the same in both languages and secondly prefers his English "Americanized". I would rather have used N.N. because most of the countries involved have connections with Latin and may well use N.N. in their native languages. N.N. is more accurate too. It is not just a matter of announcing or vacant because there has never been anyone in these positions, and the first people have not been appointed yet. To me TBA also sounds "showy" as though we are talking about a postponed rock concert. Thanks to Werner for the N.N. info, if I had been able to find an easy to quote reference I would have been happy to use N.N. Thanks everyone. - Dan
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naSee belowprofile removed
naTo be confirmedprofile removed
naTBD = to be determinedUlrike Lieder
naSee below
Anthony Frey
naTBA
Laura Gentili
navacantMargitH


  

Answers


54 mins
vacant


Explanation:
Why not use "vacant"?

See the following organizational chart at
http://da.state.ks.us/ps/subject/about.htm#Organizational Chart:
at the bottom of the page
"Administrative Services Unit Vacant, Executive Secretary"





    da.state.ks.us/ps/subject/about.htm#Organizational Chart:
MargitH
Local time: 15:38
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 39
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1 hr
TBA


Explanation:
What about To Be Announced?

Laura Gentili
Italy
Local time: 15:38
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 19
Grading comment
I do not really like this answer, but I used it because the customer is one of those nuts who firstly refuses to believe that anything could be the same in both languages and secondly prefers his English "Americanized". I would rather have used N.N. because most of the countries involved have connections with Latin and may well use N.N. in their native languages. N.N. is more accurate too. It is not just a matter of announcing or vacant because there has never been anyone in these positions, and the first people have not been appointed yet. To me TBA also sounds "showy" as though we are talking about a postponed rock concert. Thanks to Werner for the N.N. info, if I had been able to find an easy to quote reference I would have been happy to use N.N. Thanks everyone. - Dan
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7 hrs
See below


Explanation:
I have to second Laura's answer. Two years ago, I was asked to translate a conference program. I searched for quite a long time, then I found two different sources with "TBA", one was a conference program translated into English (so I was not too certain) and the second was a listing of courses offered by University of Maryland in Munich. Unfortunately, I cannot find them now and anyhow they were not available at that time on the Internet. To make certain that it is understood, you just might want to provide a footnote "To be announced".

Anthony Frey
United States
Local time: 09:38
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 444
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16 hrs
TBD = to be determined


Explanation:
Along the same lines as 2 of the previous answers - I often find this in conference programs where a speaker and/or a topic hasn't been confirmed yet. It might fit into your context since the position is there; they just don't know yet who will be filling it. HTH!

Ulrike Lieder
Local time: 06:38
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 3525
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18 hrs
See below


Explanation:
You have only two options:

TBA or N.N. (yes, indeed, you can use the Latin in English; believe it or not).
Your choice depends on the intended target audience for your translation: with Americans, I would opt for TBA; with Canadians and British, you could also use N.N. without any problems.

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PRO pts in pair: 98
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2 days15 hrs
To be confirmed


Explanation:
I know this Kudoz session is closed, but I just thought of another possible translation that doesn't sound that "showy": how about "to be confirmed". This would sound more matter-of-fact.

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PRO pts in pair: 98
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