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TEuro 4.559

English translation: The money is right, that's the most important part.

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08:59 Aug 5, 2000
German to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial
German term or phrase: TEuro 4.559
My thoughts are that the T stands for Tausend and that this means 4,559,000 Euro - can anyone confirm this? Also, does Euro have a lower/upper case e in English?
Julie
English translation:The money is right, that's the most important part.
Explanation:
As far as the amount of money goes you are 100% right. If you have to translate the "T" to save writing the three zeros/noughts, then there may be two or more alternatives, one is "k" as mentioned above, but another is "M" and you might even find the "T" in English too, for thousand. The capitalization problem is something else again. When we speak of seven dollars, six pounds, eight marks, three crowns, five pounds sterling, two yen (?? where is the "s" ??) etc, we normally do not capitalize the words. Euro seems to be an exception because of the connection to the geographical/political word "Europe". NODE shows "Euro" capitalized. Some of you may not like all my references to NODE, but we have to try to find some reputable source to quote if the customer asks. The Germans have their "Duden" and they do not want to hear a lot of blah-blah about how we are free-thinkers who do not allow some committee to prescribe how we spell or capitalize. They want an authority on the subject.

- HTH - Dan
Selected response from:

Dan McCrosky
Local time: 22:28
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naeuro
Tom Funke
naThe money is right, that's the most important part.Dan McCrosky
naeuro also foundNancy Schmeing
naYesNancy Schmeing


  

Answers


50 mins
Yes


Explanation:
Here is a URL with business reports that show TEuro, where US companies have k$. The Globe and Mail forex table carries Euro, German mark. I.e., Euro is upper, mark is lower case.


    Reference: http://www.finance-city.de/Boerse/bandit/9200/9332.htm
Nancy Schmeing
Canada
Local time: 16:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 328
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56 mins
euro also found


Explanation:
The Eurodicautom lists euro, so I would have to conclude that it can be lower-case. Perhaps the talbe was using a capitalizing convention.


    Reference: http://eurodic.ip.lu:8086//cgi-bin/edicbin/expert.pl
Nancy Schmeing
Canada
Local time: 16:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 328
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1 hr
The money is right, that's the most important part.


Explanation:
As far as the amount of money goes you are 100% right. If you have to translate the "T" to save writing the three zeros/noughts, then there may be two or more alternatives, one is "k" as mentioned above, but another is "M" and you might even find the "T" in English too, for thousand. The capitalization problem is something else again. When we speak of seven dollars, six pounds, eight marks, three crowns, five pounds sterling, two yen (?? where is the "s" ??) etc, we normally do not capitalize the words. Euro seems to be an exception because of the connection to the geographical/political word "Europe". NODE shows "Euro" capitalized. Some of you may not like all my references to NODE, but we have to try to find some reputable source to quote if the customer asks. The Germans have their "Duden" and they do not want to hear a lot of blah-blah about how we are free-thinkers who do not allow some committee to prescribe how we spell or capitalize. They want an authority on the subject.

- HTH - Dan

Dan McCrosky
Local time: 22:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1541
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3 hrs
euro


Explanation:
"euro, euros" (but EUR in its standard abbreviation,like DEM and USD). --- There has been a long thread on this on FLEFO couple of ears ago. Even then, the general agreement voiced among translators was that euro is no different from dollar and lira and ruble etc., and is ordinarily not capitalized. --=- An AltaVista word count today: word count: Euros: 272043; euros: 653722; Euro: 4107654; euro: 6932637 (a drastic shift toward lower case from two years ago; the URLs below incidentally date back to then).



    Reference: http://www.cfoeurope.com/199805e.html
    Reference: http://www.eubusiness.com/finance/990105co.htm
Tom Funke
Local time: 16:28
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 2419
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