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NB + MWst

English translation: Net amount + VAT

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:NB + MWst
English translation:Net amount + VAT
Entered by: Alison Schwitzgebel
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08:27 Oct 7, 2001
German to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial
German term or phrase: NB + MWst
This is something to do with rent and they are financial terms (I guess MWSt is something like a rentors' tax). Does anyone know what we call these in English?

Also - can anyone confirm that the abbrieviation "lfm" stands for laufende Metern and if so, do we have a phrase for this?
Richard Carter
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:19
Net amount + VAT
Explanation:
Hi!

This is how I would translate this

NB = Nettobetrag = net amount
MwSt = Mehrwertsteuer = Value added tax

lfm - I would also go with laufende meter. PONS Großwörterbuch translates DM 10 das laufende Meter as "DM 10 per meter". You don't give any context for this term, but you could probably just use "meter" or "per meter"
Selected response from:

Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 11:19
Grading comment
Many thanks - I think you were spot on!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1Net amount + VAT
Alison Schwitzgebel
4NB
Sharon Sarah Schmitz
4net amount
Mary Worby
4MWSt = VAT
Mary Worby
3No better answers, just more info.Dan McCrosky
2More context needed!
Sharon Sarah Schmitz


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
MWSt = VAT


Explanation:
MWSt = Mehrwertsteuer = Value Added Tax

Could you give us more context for the NB?

Yes, lfm = laufende Meter, normally metre is enough.

HTH

Mary

Mary Worby
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:19
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2770
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
More context needed!


Explanation:
Guesses:

NB = Neubau (modern flat/apartment)

MWSt = Mehrwertsteuer (value added tax, VAT) This one's for sure.

lfm: could be "laufender Meter", but w/o more context, it's hard to tell. By the meter, maybe?

Sharon Sarah Schmitz
Germany
Local time: 11:19
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 306
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54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
net amount


Explanation:
Just a guess - could NB be Nettobetrag?

HTH

Mary

Mary Worby
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:19
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2770
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
NB


Explanation:
Nebenkosten (extra costs)

Sharon Sarah Schmitz
Germany
Local time: 11:19
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 306
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Net amount + VAT


Explanation:
Hi!

This is how I would translate this

NB = Nettobetrag = net amount
MwSt = Mehrwertsteuer = Value added tax

lfm - I would also go with laufende meter. PONS Großwörterbuch translates DM 10 das laufende Meter as "DM 10 per meter". You don't give any context for this term, but you could probably just use "meter" or "per meter"

Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 11:19
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 3409
Grading comment
Many thanks - I think you were spot on!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Martin Schneekloth: right on the money
6 hrs
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6 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
No better answers, just more info.


Explanation:


1. MwSt is, as the others have mentioned, is Value Added Tax (VAT) but readership in some countries including the US might be more familiar with the term Sales Tax.

2. As you mention "rentals" as a general context, there is one special point that might be important: The building owner in Germany often has/had the choice of charging or not charging Mehrwertsteuer/VAT/Sales Tax on rents for space in his building.

3. "lfm" most surely means "laufende Meter" and is usually used to give a price/cost for something that has a standard width but can be of any length. Cloth prices, rope prices, or chain prices are usually quoted in "lfm" prices. So many pounds/cents/dollars/pence "per metre(er)" or "by the meter(re)". I cannot figure out a connection with your rentals context and "lfm" though unless the cost of decorating (curtain material, etc.) is being discussed.

4. All of the previous suggestions for "NB" are possible, but for a rentals context, "Neubau" is quite likely. Germans began to use this term after WWII to speak of buildings, particularly apartment buildings / blocks of flats, which were built during the general reconstruction period after the war. The opposite is "Altbau" logically enough. The term "Neubau" is slowly going out of use because many of the postwar "Neubau" buildings themselves have since been torn down and replaced or become old-fashioned. The term "Neubau" itself has become somewhat old-fashioned and often less than complimentary. Many older "Neubau" apartments/flats are no longer modern. In many cases the term "Altbau" is more complimentary, referring to charming, older, high-ceilinged flats/apartments built in the late 19th century. Often nowadays, the age in years or the year of construction is mentioned to differentiate between modern and not so modern flats/apartments.

The term "Neubau" is still often enough used however to fit in your context. The German/English/Latin meaning for NB = nota bene = note well = take special note is also quite possible, especially in contract phraseology. "Nettobetrag" = "net amount" is also quite likely, drawing over 3000 Google hits, mostly concerning MsSt. The abbreviation "NB" for "Nettobetrag" is used far less often in rental contexts but very often in banking/finance contexts.

HTH

Dan


Dan McCrosky
Local time: 11:19
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1541
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