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schräg

English translation: offbeat, unusual

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:schräg
English translation:offbeat, unusual
Entered by: Steffen Walter
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17:03 Jul 4, 2007
German to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Cinema, Film, TV, Drama / theatre
German term or phrase: schräg
Schräges Avantgarde-Theater wie “THE LITTLE MATCHGIRL”
Jeannie Graham
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:06
Offbeat, unusual
Explanation:
Schräg is a slang word (at least I think it is) and I'm pretty sure this is what it means here.

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Note added at 5 mins (2007-07-04 17:08:58 GMT)
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Would also fit with the concept of avant-garde:
1 : those who create, produce, or apply new, original, or experimental ideas, designs, and techniques in any field, especially in the arts used usually with the
2 : a group (as of writers or artists) that is unorthodox and untraditional in its approach; sometimes : such a group that is extremist, bizarre, or arty and affected
3 : advocates and admirers of the avant-garde
Selected response from:

Sarah Downing
Local time: 15:06
Grading comment
thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6Offbeat, unusual
Sarah Downing
4 +2unconventional avant-garde theatre
Julia Michel
3 +2odd-ball, subsersive, way-out, out there
Steven Sidore
3wacky
Richard Benham


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
Schräges
Offbeat, unusual


Explanation:
Schräg is a slang word (at least I think it is) and I'm pretty sure this is what it means here.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 mins (2007-07-04 17:08:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Would also fit with the concept of avant-garde:
1 : those who create, produce, or apply new, original, or experimental ideas, designs, and techniques in any field, especially in the arts used usually with the
2 : a group (as of writers or artists) that is unorthodox and untraditional in its approach; sometimes : such a group that is extremist, bizarre, or arty and affected
3 : advocates and admirers of the avant-garde

Sarah Downing
Local time: 15:06
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kcda
20 mins
  -> Thanks Kcda

agree  Lori Dendy-Molz: I like "offbeat" here, Sarah
32 mins
  -> Thanks, Lori. I do too;-)

agree  Stefanie Reinhold
3 hrs
  -> Thanks Stefani

agree  Richard Benham: I don't think it's as slangy as all that when it's used in the sense of "oblique" (at an angle,...), but obviously when it's used to mean "off-beat" or whatever, it certainly is slang.
3 hrs
  -> Thank you Richard. I'm aware of the original meaning of schraeg, but of course I meant that it is a slang word when used in this sense.

agree  Ingeborg Gowans: my first thought, context crucial however; I am reminded of 'cabaret" Die Wühlmäuse" in Berlin for example
4 hrs
  -> Thanks Ingeborg

agree  mbrodie
13 hrs
  -> Thanks mbrodie
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Schräges
unconventional avant-garde theatre


Explanation:
"schräg" simply means strange, bizarre - or unconventional, to use a term which seems to better suit the style of your original text

Julia Michel
Germany
Local time: 21:06
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Courtney Sliwinski
1 hr
  -> thanks, Courtney

agree  Lori Dendy-Molz: 'unconventional' is good here, too
20 hrs
  -> Thank you
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Schräges
odd-ball, subsersive, way-out, out there


Explanation:
without more context it's impossible to know for sure.

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Note added at 26 mins (2007-07-04 17:29:35 GMT)
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That should be 'subversive'

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Note added at 41 mins (2007-07-04 17:44:59 GMT)
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@Francis: It's my impression that schräg is usually a bit stronger than just 'off-beat', which can have a whimsical feel to it, or unconventional, which need not be strange. (It would be unconventional to perform full-dress operas in Central Park or Trafalgar Square, but those operas themselves could be extremely conservative in their dramaturgy). I included 'subversive' specifically thinking of Lenny Bruce, whose comedy is often called 'schräg' and was by all accounts subversive.

Steven Sidore
Germany
Local time: 21:06
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxFrancis Lee: Depends on the context, but for me "off-beat" is superior to your suggestions. "Schräg" is a very subjective term, but it's pretty clear what's meant. "Subversive" is definitely OTT. What do you think about our collegaues' ideas??
7 mins

agree  Eva Gross: I think odd-ball is the best out of all those terms, especially in the context of avantgarde theater
7 hrs

agree  Nadine Kahn: Yeah.. odd, whimsical... my first idea was off-key, but doesn't fit the bill I guess
12 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
wacky


Explanation:
This is another suggestion I'm throwing into the ring. It's not how we use the word "wacky" in Australia, but I have heard our British cousins use it in this sense. I don't think it would work for North America, but who knows?

Richard Benham
France
Local time: 21:06
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Eva Gross: Wacky has a slightly different connotation in US English, more like "crazy" or "off his/her rocker"
4 hrs
  -> Well, I did say "I don't think it would work for North America", didn't I?

neutral  Julia Michel: I have to confirm what Eva wrote - wacky wouldn't work in a US context./Sorry, no offense, just confirming your thoughts./Don't worry about it, Richard! :-)
17 hrs
  -> I have already pointed this out.//Sorry, perhaps I was a bit sensitive. Cheers!
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Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
Non-PRO (1): Steven Sidore


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Changes made by editors
Jul 5, 2007 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/11098">Jeannie Graham's</a> old entry - "schräg" » "Offbeat, unusual"
Jul 4, 2007 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
Term askedSchräges » schräg


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