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Himbeerragout

English translation: Ragout of raspberries

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19:41 Feb 20, 2018
German to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / Menu
German term or phrase: Himbeerragout
I saw this on a menu and inwardly shuddered. But maybe I'm wrong. Could my learned colleagues give their opinions on whether this is an acceptable phrase and how would they translate it into English. The obvious?
Wendy Streitparth
Germany
Local time: 09:13
English translation:Ragout of raspberries
Explanation:
Hello Wendy,

I'm going to stick my neck out here and say that 'ragout of raspberries' is a perfectly good translation for a menu. I realise that there is a great divide between UK and US menus, where the latter would tend to mention the food before the description (salmon fillet Vs fillet of salmon, for example). In my opinion, however, ragout of raspberries has a nicer ring to it than raspberry ragout and certainly sounds exotic and interesting – which is what most menu writers strive to achieve. And from my experience with menus, it would seem that there is no limit to a chef's creativity these days.

But down to the nitty gritty, a ragout describes a slow cooking process of meat (or other ingredients, doesn't necessarily have to be...) in a sauce, flavoured with spices. I think a ragout here keeps this idea of the fruit being slowly stewed, or poached, with spices, leaving the fruit recognisable in the juices. Compote, on the other hand, may suggest that the fruit has been puréed, and coulis, which quite often also has the seeds removed, is definitely not a good solution. Another option would be ‘slowly stewed’ or ‘slow-poached raspberries’, given that these will be poaching in their own juices or other liquid. However you may find yourself needing to bring in the concept of spices if you use either of these suggestions. And because you’re translating a menu here and the Himbeerragout will probably be served alongside something else, I would definitely stick with the concise “ragout of raspberries” to avoid any lengthy menu description.
Selected response from:

Sarah Bessioud
Germany
Local time: 09:13
Grading comment
Many thanks to everyone. Had hoped there might be something other than the suggestions I had already come up with.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2Ragout of raspberries
Sarah Bessioud


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Ragout of raspberries


Explanation:
Hello Wendy,

I'm going to stick my neck out here and say that 'ragout of raspberries' is a perfectly good translation for a menu. I realise that there is a great divide between UK and US menus, where the latter would tend to mention the food before the description (salmon fillet Vs fillet of salmon, for example). In my opinion, however, ragout of raspberries has a nicer ring to it than raspberry ragout and certainly sounds exotic and interesting – which is what most menu writers strive to achieve. And from my experience with menus, it would seem that there is no limit to a chef's creativity these days.

But down to the nitty gritty, a ragout describes a slow cooking process of meat (or other ingredients, doesn't necessarily have to be...) in a sauce, flavoured with spices. I think a ragout here keeps this idea of the fruit being slowly stewed, or poached, with spices, leaving the fruit recognisable in the juices. Compote, on the other hand, may suggest that the fruit has been puréed, and coulis, which quite often also has the seeds removed, is definitely not a good solution. Another option would be ‘slowly stewed’ or ‘slow-poached raspberries’, given that these will be poaching in their own juices or other liquid. However you may find yourself needing to bring in the concept of spices if you use either of these suggestions. And because you’re translating a menu here and the Himbeerragout will probably be served alongside something else, I would definitely stick with the concise “ragout of raspberries” to avoid any lengthy menu description.

Sarah Bessioud
Germany
Local time: 09:13
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 56
Grading comment
Many thanks to everyone. Had hoped there might be something other than the suggestions I had already come up with.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks, Sarah. Guess this will have to do, though I can't help but associate ragout with meat or at least a main course. I certainly wouldn't demean my own raspberries by calling them a ragout!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lancashireman: Well-argued case
17 hrs
  -> Thank you, Lancashireman

agree  herbalchemist: I think ragout of... is also fine for an American menu, assuming it's not a KFC :)
4 days
  -> Thank you for this confirmation, herbalchemist. Indeed, I've never been fond of chicken with raspberries anyway ;-)
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PRO (3): ntext, Lancashireman, herbalchemist


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Changes made by editors
Feb 25 - Changes made by herbalchemist:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO


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