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Nesthocker

English translation: boomerang kids

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20:06 Sep 3, 2006
German to English translations [PRO]
Education / Pedagogy / Family Life
German term or phrase: Nesthocker
In German pedagogic language, this term describes a person leaving the parents' home at a very late age (usually for reasons of comfort). A 30-year-old still living at his/her parents' home would thus be called a "Nesthocker". Is there an English equivalent for this?

See also:
http://www.single-generation.de/glossar/nesthocker.htm
TDK
Germany
Local time: 10:31
English translation:boomerang kids
Explanation:
This is the term I have heard for them in the USA.

You toss them out to college and the just keep coming back!
Selected response from:

jccantrell
United States
Local time: 01:31
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3boomerang kids
jccantrell
3Kippers
Translate IP


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
boomerang kids


Explanation:
This is the term I have heard for them in the USA.

You toss them out to college and the just keep coming back!



    Reference: http://www.sfu.ca/mediapr/Releases/News/1995/Nov95/boomerang...
    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boomerang_Generation
jccantrell
United States
Local time: 01:31
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 33
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ingeborg Gowans: yes, it makes me think of the movie "failure to launch"
9 mins

agree  swisstell: certainly much better than "nest stool" which I just found in one Google translation!
10 mins

agree  Hildegard Klein-Bodenheimer
15 mins

neutral  Trudy Peters: That's assuming he had already left and came back, whereas - if I understand the question correctly - it refers so someone who's never moved out.
32 mins
  -> This may be a difference between the USA and Germany. A lot of kids here go AWAY to college, so technically, they have left (See "empty nest syndrome"). In Germany, I believe, they tend to be commuter students.

neutral  xxxAnglo-German: No, only a small percentage commute. Nesthocker normally aren't university students.
23 hrs
  -> Soooo, a student who moves out, goes to school, and then comes back is NOT a Nesthocker? It sounds like this is what you are saying...
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30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Kippers


Explanation:
This seems to be a term used in the UK. It stands for Kids In Parents' Pockets Eroding Retirement Savings".

http://www.fool.co.uk/news/Comment/2006/c060403b.htm

http://www.investopedia.com/terms/k/kippers.asp

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/your_money/3276039.stm

Translate IP
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:31
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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Changes made by editors
Sep 3, 2006 - Changes made by Klaus Urban:
Language pairEnglish to German » German to English


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