KudoZ home » German to English » Education / Pedagogy

Magister

English translation: Magister (appr. comparable with a North American Masters degree)

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Magister
English translation:Magister (appr. comparable with a North American Masters degree)
Entered by: ICTAC
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

08:35 Oct 26, 2004
German to English translations [PRO]
Education / Pedagogy
German term or phrase: Magister
I hope I'm not opening up an 'old chestnut' here: Is there a commonly accepted way of translating the German 'Magister' into English? I've seen various GlossPosts suggesting that the term is equivalent to either a bachelor's degree or a master's degree. Which one is it?

When translating an education certificate, should this perhaps be left in German with an English entry in parentheses after the German?
arum
Local time: 09:01
Magister (comparable with a North American Masters degree)
Explanation:
This can hardly be generally anwered. As educational systems between countries and continents and even between U.S. American states and thus the time periods for courses vary, a M.A. cannot always be considered equivalent to a Magister although the words have the same meaning.

E.g., I have a Masters degree in North America and also a 4-year German educational diploma, which was assessed to be equivalent to a North American Bachelors degree. From my experience in North America I can say that a German 4-year education or even a Vordiplom is often equivalent to a North American Masters degree from a quality and theoretical knowledge point of view, even if not officially acknowledged. This very much depends on the course, the school/university and state.

As a general rule, I would always use the original term and briefly explain the equivalent or similar term in the other language.
Selected response from:

ICTAC
Canada
Local time: 23:01
Grading comment
Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4Magister (comparable with a North American Masters degree)
ICTAC
3 +4Masters
Derek Gill Franßen
3yes, leave it!
Ian M-H
4 -1M.A.
Gert Sass (M.A.)


  

Answers


17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Masters


Explanation:
So, let's see if I get bashed for this one too (see: http://www.proz.com/kudoz/842313?float=1). There are probably going to be several answers.
Either way, I think that a "Magister" is pretty much the same as a "Masters". In Germany, one may 'do' a masters program, which ends with a masters thesis, only after receiving the "Diplom". Usually, the studies at the university 'end' with the "Diplom". I would consider everything that comes afterwards as "post-graduate", i.e. either a "masters program" or a "doctorate (PhD) program".
All of that, of course, IMHO. :-)

Derek Gill Franßen
Germany
Local time: 08:01
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 51

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  moser.ilja
1 min
  -> Thank you Iljamose.

agree  Orla Ryan
25 mins
  -> Thank you Orla.

disagree  Ralf A. Schumacher: No "bashing", but the German univ. system is just different. The degree usually depends on the Fakultät (school) and Studiengang (subject). Most philosophical majors lead to a Mag. Artium, while most practical/technical subjects end w/ the Diplom.
48 mins
  -> You are right, of course - though I honestly don't see too much of a difference between "pretty much the same" and "comparable" (the version you agreed to). :-)

agree  Kathy O
2 hrs
  -> Thank you Kathy.

neutral  ICTAC: Derek, "pretty much the same" is not really the way you would put it in a translation, is it?
2 hrs
  -> No, not really, although I might put it that way in a comment. Your suggestion is fine and I understand Ralf's point - in writing "pretty much the same", I tried commenting on it not being (or being more than) a bachelor's degree, as was asked. :-)

agree  Lys Nguyen: thanks
4 hrs
  -> ...you're welcome (for what?). :-)

agree  Robert Schlarb: The only way to go unless you wish to write a novel explaining the differences in systems
9 hrs
  -> My sentiments exactly, thank you Robert. ;-)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
M.A.


Explanation:
or master´s degree, which means the same.
M.A.= Master of Arts (English)
M.A. = Magister Artium (Latin, or the equivalent German expression)

To point out the difference between a German "Magister" and the international M.A., you may also call it a "German M.A." but you should not expect people abroad to know what it implies.

Gert Sass (M.A.)
Germany
Local time: 08:01
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Robert Schlarb: MA MEd MSc MPhil or what else?
9 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

46 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Magister (comparable with a North American Masters degree)


Explanation:
This can hardly be generally anwered. As educational systems between countries and continents and even between U.S. American states and thus the time periods for courses vary, a M.A. cannot always be considered equivalent to a Magister although the words have the same meaning.

E.g., I have a Masters degree in North America and also a 4-year German educational diploma, which was assessed to be equivalent to a North American Bachelors degree. From my experience in North America I can say that a German 4-year education or even a Vordiplom is often equivalent to a North American Masters degree from a quality and theoretical knowledge point of view, even if not officially acknowledged. This very much depends on the course, the school/university and state.

As a general rule, I would always use the original term and briefly explain the equivalent or similar term in the other language.

ICTAC
Canada
Local time: 23:01
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ralf A. Schumacher: This final paragraph tells just what I was going to say - thanks for sparing me the typing! :)
23 mins
  -> very welcome :)

agree  xxxFrancis Lee: The safest option; an Oxford University MA is (or at least used to be) a BA plus 100 bucks, which makes a mockery of the whole system: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/478163.stm
41 mins

agree  Ian M-H: subject to even more caution: "approximately" comparable
2 hrs
  -> Yes, I agree

agree  Lys Nguyen: thanks
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
yes, leave it!


Explanation:
I had a fair bit to do with this, both translating CVs and as a university tutor trying to explain the German system to Brits, and vice versa, in order to assist exchange students. Taking other systems (e.g. the USA) into account, it becomes even less safe to attempt a translation, although this doesn't mean that I disagree with what Derek has written.

I'd be even more cautious than ICTAC, though - perhaps "roughly comparable to"?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 3 mins (2004-10-26 11:38:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

... or \"with\" ;-)

Ian M-H
United States
Local time: 02:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 72
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search