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Grüsse

English translation: Greetings, Stephen! (see below)

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12:44 Oct 30, 2005
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
Marketing - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
German term or phrase: Grüsse
"Alle Jahre wieder...!"
A client of mine wishes to distinguish between :
"Herzliche Weihnachtsgrüße sendet dir Martin ..."(post with a more private nature)
and
"Weihnachtliche Grüße aus Düsseldorf, Frau Schmitz...." (more formal)
Would the first be "Heartfelt Christmas Greetings"
and the second "Season's Greetings"?
I am not into this stuff these days, BTW UK English is wanted! And is my propsed capitalisation correct?
Stephen Sadie
Germany
Local time: 22:59
English translation:Greetings, Stephen! (see below)
Explanation:
Private:
Wishing you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year
Martin

Formal:
Season’s Greetings from Düsseldorf

Probably best not to name any religious festivity in business correspondence because ‘this may cause offence to persons of different faiths or none’!
‘Hearfelt’ should be reserved for illness and bereavement. You could use ‘sincere’ for ‘herzlich’.


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Note added at 30 mins (2005-10-30 13:15:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

‘Hearfelt’ >‘Heartfelt’

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs 6 mins (2005-10-30 22:50:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Heartfelt commiserations, Stephen. Your query has been downgraded to ‘non-pro’. Presumably the two peers behind this move underestimated the native-speaker sensitivities and socio-cultural background required to formulate an answer.
Selected response from:

Lancashireman
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:59
Grading comment
My client kept the formal one and took Warmest greetings...for the personal version. Thanks everyone
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +13Greetings, Stephen! (see below)Lancashireman
4Martin wishes you a very happy ChristmasxxxAnna Blackab
3 +1s. Unten
Languageman


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Grüsse
s. Unten


Explanation:
Season's Greetings sounds fine for the second example, but I´m not sure about "heartfelt" for the first. I think "warmest" would be better.

Languageman
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:59
Works in field
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Erik Macki: Yes, heartfelt is not "colocated" with greetings in English. Warmest would be much better.
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Grüsse
Martin wishes you a very happy Christmas


Explanation:
This is quite informal and friendly - for your first greeting, and I agree with your suggestions of season's greetings for your more formal one.

xxxAnna Blackab
Local time: 21:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +13
Grüsse
Greetings, Stephen! (see below)


Explanation:
Private:
Wishing you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year
Martin

Formal:
Season’s Greetings from Düsseldorf

Probably best not to name any religious festivity in business correspondence because ‘this may cause offence to persons of different faiths or none’!
‘Hearfelt’ should be reserved for illness and bereavement. You could use ‘sincere’ for ‘herzlich’.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 30 mins (2005-10-30 13:15:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

‘Hearfelt’ >‘Heartfelt’

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs 6 mins (2005-10-30 22:50:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Heartfelt commiserations, Stephen. Your query has been downgraded to ‘non-pro’. Presumably the two peers behind this move underestimated the native-speaker sensitivities and socio-cultural background required to formulate an answer.

Lancashireman
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 135
Grading comment
My client kept the formal one and took Warmest greetings...for the personal version. Thanks everyone

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Meturgan
10 mins

agree  Frosty: Absolutely!
13 mins

agree  xxxIanW
28 mins

agree  michael10705
42 mins

agree  xxxAnna Blackab: This is better than my version - and the capitals seem right too.
56 mins

agree  lindaellen
1 hr

agree  Erik Macki
3 hrs

agree  Sigrid Thorbjørnsrud
3 hrs

agree  Ken Cox: Fine for NA as well
3 hrs

agree  Trudy Peters
5 hrs

agree  Ingrid Blank
5 hrs

agree  Nicole Schnell
12 hrs

agree  xxxFrancis Lee: Ach ... "memories" of John/Johann Heartfield/Herzfeld
1 day 57 mins
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Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
PRO (3): Lancashireman, Languageman, Brie Vernier
Non-PRO (1): Ted Wozniak


Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Oct 30, 2005 - Changes made by xxxIanW:
LevelPRO » Non-PRO


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