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Tscheuss or tschuss (sic)

English translation: Bye

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Tscheuss or tschuss (sic)
English translation:Bye
Entered by: Hilary Davies Shelby
Options:
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21:10 Feb 21, 2006
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
German term or phrase: Tscheuss or tschuss (sic)
term of parting I believe; used in southern Germany/Austria instead of aufwiedersehen.
Is it Bavarian, German, Austrian? Who normally uses it.
Considered informal or dialect? How is it viewed if a non-German uses it? Thanks in advance.
jerry joyce
Bye
Explanation:
Hello! This is a casual "bye!", rather than a more formal "goodbye" - I've met it (and variants, such as "Tschoe" and "Tschuessi") in Hessen and Baden-Wuerttemburg. It's used among friends, coworkers, relatives and in shops/pubs (of the less formal variety), more commonly among younger people.
Selected response from:

Hilary Davies Shelby
United States
Local time: 20:23
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4Bye
Hilary Davies Shelby
3 +2see yaTrans-Marie
3 +2ciao/cheers
Johanna Timm, PhD


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Bye


Explanation:
Hello! This is a casual "bye!", rather than a more formal "goodbye" - I've met it (and variants, such as "Tschoe" and "Tschuessi") in Hessen and Baden-Wuerttemburg. It's used among friends, coworkers, relatives and in shops/pubs (of the less formal variety), more commonly among younger people.

Hilary Davies Shelby
United States
Local time: 20:23
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  franglish: Tschüss is also widely used in the German-speaking parts of Switzerland
10 hrs
  -> didn't know that ;-)

agree  Steven Sidore: used everywhere in Germany I've ever been, and that's pretty much all over.
12 hrs
  -> ;-)

agree  Dr. Georg Schweigart: good explanation who and when it is used
12 hrs
  -> thank you!

agree  Nicole Y. Adams, M.A.
21 hrs
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
ciao/cheers


Explanation:
Tschüs (auch „tschüss“) ist ein Abschiedsgruß aus der plattdeutschen Sprache, der sich – ähnlich wie die Begrüßung moin – zunehmend auch im hochdeutschen und oberdeutschen Sprachraum findet.

Tschüs ist als Lehnwort aus dem romanischen Sprachraum übernommen worden. Einen Hinweis auf die Abstammung des Wortes gibt die teilweise auch heute noch im Norden verwendete Fassung atschüs (auch adjüs geschrieben, z. B. in Fritz Reuter). Vergleiche adieu, adios, ade.

Besonders in Mecklenburg wird auch die Form tschüssing verwendet; im Rheinland ist die Form tschö, in Schleswig-Holstein die Variante Tüüs verbreitet.

de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tschüss

You may also want to check the discussion here:
http://dict.leo.org/cgi-bin/dict/forum.cgi?action=show&sort_...

Johanna Timm, PhD
Canada
Local time: 18:23
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 55

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Steven Sidore: When I studied linguistics we were told that it was a version of adieu. Who knows?
12 hrs

agree  Dr. Georg Schweigart: yes, I once learnt it is a version of "adieu"
12 hrs
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31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
see ya


Explanation:
See ya comes close to it, I would think, although this is not an exact equivalent. Just an idea. I'm from the north of Germany and the expression is very typical for that area. The other day,I a Scottish person said tschüß to me, she learnt it on a course. I found that really charming, but it depends on the circumstances of course. It is rather informal.

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Note added at 41 mins (2006-02-21 21:51:37 GMT)
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Hier was aus dem Hamburger Abendblatt:

http://www.abendblatt.de/daten/2002/08/07/54854.html

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Note added at 2 hrs (2006-02-21 23:13:31 GMT)
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or tschüs(s), rather

Trans-Marie
Local time: 02:23
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Steven Sidore: I think my favorite was when I lived in the Rheinland (Bonn). Many people there say "tschüsschen", which I would translate as "toodles". Would a beefy construction guy say "toodles" in English? They do in German...
12 hrs

agree  Dr. Georg Schweigart
12 hrs
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