(etwas) am Schwanz die Treppe runterploppen

English translation: bounced down the stairs (by the tail) / knocked about / "bruised" and "bumped" ...

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04:36 Nov 29, 2006
German to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
German term or phrase: (etwas) am Schwanz die Treppe runterploppen
This phrase appears in a press release about a stuffed animal toy in the following sentence: "Verstehen Sie – ein Stofftier, dass einen tröstet, das zwischen den Generationen vermittelt, das geliebt und geherzt wird, das am Schwanz die Treppe runtergeploppt wird." Any suggestions for a good English translation of this phrase? Thanks so much!
alentrix
English translation:bounced down the stairs (by the tail) / knocked about / "bruised" and "bumped" ...
Explanation:
That's basically what they mean. You drag things down hills, but down steps you inevitably get the "bounce" effect. The toy will repeatedly make a thud sound, which what the "ploppen" as such refers to, BUT I'd say the bounce option is preferable.

In any case, I don't think a literal tanslation is neede here. After all, the main message is that the toy
- gets its fair share of knocks / "bruises and bumps" (even if accidentally)

More context wiuld help, e.g. will your translation be the actual English press release and who is it aimed at?
Selected response from:

xxxFrancis Lee
Local time: 03:19
Grading comment
Thanks for your answer!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +3bounced down the stairs (by the tail) / knocked about / "bruised" and "bumped" ...
xxxFrancis Lee
3dragged down the stairs by the tail
Bettina GJ
2is pulled, rumpledithump, down the stairs by its tail
Rebecca Garber


  

Answers


54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
dragged down the stairs by the tail


Explanation:
We all know what is meant, but - is there really an expression that softens this?

Bettina GJ
Seychelles
Local time: 05:19
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  dwa: maybe plonked down the stairs by its tail - runterploppen is supposed to sound like a childish-careless mistreatment
35 mins
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
bounced down the stairs (by the tail) / knocked about / "bruised" and "bumped" ...


Explanation:
That's basically what they mean. You drag things down hills, but down steps you inevitably get the "bounce" effect. The toy will repeatedly make a thud sound, which what the "ploppen" as such refers to, BUT I'd say the bounce option is preferable.

In any case, I don't think a literal tanslation is neede here. After all, the main message is that the toy
- gets its fair share of knocks / "bruises and bumps" (even if accidentally)

More context wiuld help, e.g. will your translation be the actual English press release and who is it aimed at?


xxxFrancis Lee
Local time: 03:19
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 80
Grading comment
Thanks for your answer!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lori Dendy-Molz: maybe "bounce down the stairs behind its owner" - sounds a bit less brutal
17 mins
  -> In fact, "bounced and bundled" might sound less brutal

agree  Ingeborg Gowans: I would avoid: bruised instead:/bounced and bumped
3 hrs
  -> We can all picture and hear the scenario, but is there a single word for it in English?

agree  Bettina GJ: After having found "bumped" in Milne's "Winnie-the-Pooh" (p.1), I think that's the best option - "bounced" implies that the object has a certain springiness to it, like a ball, which a soft toy doesn't. Also, "bumped" is an onomatopoeic like "ploppen".
17 hrs
  -> Thanks for that superlative reference! (and you seem to have inspired Rebecca) Yes, it'd be nice to reflect the onomatopoeia; "lollop" or "bobb" would be perfect except they're intransitive/active verbs.
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
is pulled, rumpledithump, down the stairs by its tail


Explanation:
Pooh's entrance in the Christopher Robin books by A.A. Milne.


Rebecca Garber
Local time: 21:19
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Bettina GJ: Just to put the record straight - you beat me to it by 7 hours! I actually didn't see your's before I posted mine. Interesting question here, though: in MY version of "Winnie" there is no "rumpledithump" - is that an American rendering of "bumping"?
16 hrs
  -> Two languages crossed in my head: my daughter liked the sound of the Latin better than the English when she was quite small. Go figure.
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