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'ran gewichst und nicht gezittert

English translation: let's get on with it no matter what; let's get to it without delay ( no time to be afraid)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:'ran gewichst und nicht gezittert
English translation:let's get on with it no matter what; let's get to it without delay ( no time to be afraid)
Entered by: Ingeborg Gowans
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16:24 Nov 13, 2008
German to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
German term or phrase: 'ran gewichst und nicht gezittert
In a 1941 letter, a soldier begins a letter to his wife as follows:
Trotz eines augenblicklichen physischen Unbehagens (Kater was schnurrst Du so nett) ••'ran gewichst u. nicht gezittert.•• Und wenn der olle Schädel noch so brummt u. stöhnt, es wird geschrieben, es muss geschrieben werden, mach ein, mach hin, und Nerven behalten.

I found "hinein gewichst und nicht gezittert" as a Skat expression, of which I assume this is a variation, but I'm not sure of the meaning, especially in the hangover context. The first word appears to be 'ran, but it could be 'rein with an undotted i. Any suggestions?
Ann C Sherwin
Local time: 22:16
let's get on with it no matter what; let's get to it without delay ( no time to be afraid)
Explanation:
not at all sure of the tone here, if he writes to his wife, even with a hangover, one would hope he is not afraid and it is a bit more than duty?? Maybe I would even leave out"und nicht gezittert" "and not be afraid" since it doesn't seem to be necessary
Selected response from:

Ingeborg Gowans
Canada
Local time: 23:16
Grading comment
Thanks, Ingeborg. You deserve the points. I hadn't noticed that Johanna's note was just a reference for your answer.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
2 +1let's get on with it no matter what; let's get to it without delay ( no time to be afraid)
Ingeborg Gowans
Summary of reference entries provided
ran an den Feind
Johanna Timm, PhD

Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
let's get on with it no matter what; let's get to it without delay ( no time to be afraid)


Explanation:
not at all sure of the tone here, if he writes to his wife, even with a hangover, one would hope he is not afraid and it is a bit more than duty?? Maybe I would even leave out"und nicht gezittert" "and not be afraid" since it doesn't seem to be necessary

Ingeborg Gowans
Canada
Local time: 23:16
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 31
Grading comment
Thanks, Ingeborg. You deserve the points. I hadn't noticed that Johanna's note was just a reference for your answer.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Johanna Timm, PhD
21 hrs
  -> thank you very much, Johanna, an agree from you matters to me:) Have a nice weekend!
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Reference comments


1 hr peer agreement (net): +2
Reference: ran an den Feind

Reference information:
The Skat expression is a variation on the expression “Ran an den Feind und nicht gezittert” which dates back to the times of World War I where it was used to root for young athletes to work out and train their bodies to be fit for the war.
http://shortify.com/8084
I’ve often heard the two parts of this expression: “ran an den feind” and “…und nicht gezittert” being used separately, or like in this case, one part replaced with a variation.
Meaning: to unflinchingly face something that is maybe a little uncomfortable/difficult/tricky, “just getting it over with”

Agree with Olaf re the sexual connotation.

Johanna Timm, PhD
Canada
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 55

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  Ingeborg Gowans: good reference/ not sure about the sexual connotation, m. I would think more along the lines of "Stiefel wichsen", duty calls or something like that
3 hrs
  -> you are right regarding Stiefel wichsen - that's a plausible explanation
agree  xxxhazmatgerman: Yes and with shoe polish: like "shipshape and Bristol fashion", i.e. dressed to kill so to speak. Another var. of "ran an den Feind" was "Näher Ran, Gropius" with Gropius being a proper name. Regards.
13 hrs
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Changes made by editors
Nov 14, 2008 - Changes made by Ingeborg Gowans:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/5155">Ann C Sherwin's</a> old entry - "'ran gewichst und nicht gezittert" » "let's get on with it no matter what; let's get to it without delay ( no time to be afraid)"


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