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Euromuffel

English translation: Euro-skeptics/Euro-sceptics/Eurosceptics/Euroskeptics

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Euromuffel
English translation:Euro-skeptics/Euro-sceptics/Eurosceptics/Euroskeptics
Entered by: Eszter Bokor
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

16:41 Nov 20, 2013
German to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Idioms / Maxims / Sayings
German term or phrase: Euromuffel
Schlagzeile in einer Zeitung: Deutsche sind keine „Euro-Muffel“
Eszter Bokor
Austria
Local time: 23:08
Euro-skeptics/Euro-sceptics/Eurosceptics/Euroskeptics
Explanation:
People who do not want the powers of the EU to increase.

Pick out the spelling you prefer.

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Note added at 8 mins (2013-11-20 16:49:59 GMT)
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http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-10-14/why-euro-ske...

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-11-12/euro-skeptics-in-fi...

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/00da55ca-2f3c-11e3-8cb2-00144feab7...

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Note added at 14 mins (2013-11-20 16:56:20 GMT)
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If it's about money

D-Mark nostalgists

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Note added at 17 mins (2013-11-20 16:59:02 GMT)
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Reference for D-Mark Nostalgiker (D-Mark nostalgists)

http://www.spiegel.de/wirtschaft/soziales/angst-vor-euro-cra...



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Note added at 18 hrs (2013-11-21 10:52:18 GMT)
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How about something like

"Germans are not as indifferent to the euro as they seem"
Selected response from:

Yorkshireman
Germany
Local time: 23:08
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1Euro-skeptics/Euro-sceptics/Eurosceptics/Euroskeptics
Yorkshireman
3 +2Euro fatigue
Michael Martin, MA
3 +1Europetulant
Ramey Rieger
3a-okay with euro
Bernhard Sulzer
2 +1Euro-refuseniks
Heather McCrae
3Euro-grouches
ElliCom
1Euro-phobicKphred


Discussion entries: 53





  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Euro-grouches


Explanation:
There are many ways to express the term "Muffel"... grouches or sourpusses (very colloquial and very American)... you could also work around the term by saying Germans are not turned off by Europe (i.e. the rest of Europe). Unless this refers to the currency, which would then be "turned off by the Euro"

Example sentence(s):
  • The Germans are not Euro-grouches
ElliCom
Local time: 17:08
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
Euro-phobic


Explanation:
In the context, it might make sense to freely translate the headline as "Germans are not Euro-phobic" even though this is a bit of a stretch, but it coincides nicely with all of the other phobias they claim to be free of.

Kphred
Local time: 15:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
Notes to answerer
Asker: I relly like that! Do you think I could use it as a noun, Europhobe? (Just like homophobe?)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Ramey Rieger: excellent commentary!!!
59 mins

neutral  Michael Martin, MA: Much to be criticized about German conduct in Europe but (not) calling it Euro-phobic would definitely be more than what Muffel connotes. Germans rail about (smaller) member states or European bureaucracy but it doesn't reach the level of Euro bashing.
3 hrs
  -> HaHa, Good one. Since the article in question intends to deny that Germans complain about the Euro, it would make sense to claim that they are not euro-phobes, to eliminate the possibility of reading it to mean that they are not merely complaining a lot.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Euro fatigue


Explanation:
This is a headline, right? That means we have to consider what sounds good as a headline, not just look at the isolated term..

Germans betraying (showing) no signs of Euro fatigue

(not suffering from euro fatigue)



Michael Martin, MA
United States
Local time: 17:08
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 51

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Johanna Timm, PhD: Nice - and a great suggestion for the headline.
18 mins
  -> Thanks, Johanna!

neutral  Yorkshireman: Fatigue ? Do you both really mean being tired of the euro/Europe or being exhausted by the one or the other? @Bernhard, an understandable typo - Muffler and exhaust ;-)
3 hrs
  -> Yep. The term is widely used. Describes exactly what being a “Muffler” is all about – showing exhausted reluctance but stopping short of outright rejection.

neutral  Bernhard Sulzer: "no fatigue" is a bit different from "being bothered by it" IMO / - "no fatigue" is a different idea.
4 hrs
  -> Everybody knows "fatigue" is not a precise translation for Muffel. That's not the point. Unlike other commenters, I rarely do "literal" translations for newspaper headlines. They tend not to be very effective. My clients would not have hired me if I did.

agree  Kirsten Bodart: I think that's a great idea! There are all kinds of fatigue that mean no longer being interested.
14 hrs
  -> Thanks, Kirsten.

neutral  Lancashireman: No sign of fatigue = Their enthusiasm is undiminished. Overstating the case, I think.
15 hrs
  -> You can't always mechanically construe the flipside of a statement and claim the result was logically implied by the first statement. That works with math but only occasionally with language.

neutral  ElliCom: Fatigue could result from years of being "Muffel". The slight humor in the German HL is gone.
18 hrs
  -> There wasn't much humor left in that expression to begin with..
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Europetulant


Explanation:
Got them both!

Ramey Rieger
Germany
Local time: 23:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 63

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Yorkshireman: Hard to remain neutral, but it's the only choice unless they extend the selection to include outrageously witty.
1 hr

agree  ElliCom: This is nice! not entirely sure how it would read in a headline
16 hrs
  -> I posted it mainly for the lovely duality, Elli, and because the reader just has to look twice. I still like 'No such thing as a Europetulant German' or Europetulant? No the Germans, or 'Europetulance is not German'.
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16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Euro-refuseniks


Explanation:
just an idea :)

Heather McCrae
Germany
Local time: 23:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lancashireman: Hi Heather. One of two that I was mulling over (along with 'euro deniers'). But why the capital letter for the currency and why the German hyphen? // euro refuseniks (space, no hyphen). It's the currency, like dollar, yen, pound etc - no capital letter.
53 mins
  -> well, do they mean the Euro as in money or Europe? I think Euro-refuseniks meets both meanings, eurorefuseniks is a bit difficult to read :)
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Euro-skeptics/Euro-sceptics/Eurosceptics/Euroskeptics


Explanation:
People who do not want the powers of the EU to increase.

Pick out the spelling you prefer.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2013-11-20 16:49:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-10-14/why-euro-ske...

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-11-12/euro-skeptics-in-fi...

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/00da55ca-2f3c-11e3-8cb2-00144feab7...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 mins (2013-11-20 16:56:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If it's about money

D-Mark nostalgists

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 mins (2013-11-20 16:59:02 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Reference for D-Mark Nostalgiker (D-Mark nostalgists)

http://www.spiegel.de/wirtschaft/soziales/angst-vor-euro-cra...



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Note added at 18 hrs (2013-11-21 10:52:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

How about something like

"Germans are not as indifferent to the euro as they seem"


    Reference: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Euro-skeptic
Yorkshireman
Germany
Local time: 23:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 31

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Heather McCrae: Euro-sceptic, goes with the Euro-scepticism in the text
16 hrs

neutral  Kirsten Bodart: I know this is a term used in this context, but it doesn't really sum up the kind of passive disinterest that Muffel expresses. Scepticism is more active, IMO. Also the same word cropping up one line below that is too much repetition style-wise for me.
17 hrs
  -> I think "indifference" sums it up rather well - or, as we say in Yorkshire, "ah doan't gi a toss abaht it""
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20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
keine Euromuffel
a-okay with euro


Explanation:
Headline:

You Can Say "Euro" Before Breakfast in Germany
Germans A-Okay With Euro
Germans Not Grumbling About Euro (Euro Currency)

more suggestions below


keeping in mind that "Muffel" is humorous.

It means the Germans find nothing wrong with the euro (currency) = they're not grumpy about it, not griping about it, etc., not even before breakfast, the most important meal of the day for Germans. (well that's great :-))

I suggest to keep the word "euro" separate if you want to follow the German meaning as in the currency.
"Euro Grumblers" would be a possibility but not as clear to everyone.
It depends on the article:

Other headline suggestions:


The Germans: Euro Grumblers They Are Not (They're Not)
Germans Not Bothered By Euro (Euro Currency)
Germans Don't Mind/Hate Their Euro (Euro Currency)

You Can Talk to Germans About the Euro Before Breakfast/in the Morning

- the meanings "EU/Europe" are IMO not included in the German headline. You can adjust if necessary.
The English word "euro" correctly denotes the currency* as well but one finds "euro" also used to mean "European Union" although not often in that sense:

As European Union - euro-grumblers
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/cifamerica/2010/nov...
Addressing a pre-summit Washington forum organised by the EU Institute for Security Studies, Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, Europe director on Obama's national security council, said the Euro-grumblers and whingers had got it all wrong. "Re-engaging with our European allies is a top priority for the Obama administration. We have no ambivalence about the emerging role of the [post-Lisbon treaty] European Union. It is not a rival but a partner," she said.

*
http://www.moneynews.com/StreetTalk/Spain-Crisis-euro-bank/2...
Spain: Euro Partners' Pledges Sufficient to Fix Banks



http://de.thefreedictionary.com/Muffel
Mụf·fel der <Muffels, Muffel>
1. (umg. abwert.) ein mürrischer Mensch Der Taxifahrer war ein Muffel, er hat kaum mit mir geredet.
mufflig
2. ein Wildschaf


http://de.thefreedictionary.com/Muffel
TheFreeDictionary.com Deutsches Wörterbuch. © 2009 Farlex, Inc. and partners.
Mụf•fel der; -s, -; gespr pej; jemand, der unfreundlich ist und oft schlechte Laune hat
|| -K: Morgenmuffel
|| hierzu mụf•fe•lig, mụff•lig Adj

TheFreeDictionary.com Großwörterbuch Deutsch als Fremdsprache. © 2009 Farlex, Inc. and partners.

NB: Nod to Andrew: "euro" should be in small caps except wherever caps are necessary (headline, title) and no hyphen when combining it with one other word, yes.

Bernhard Sulzer
United States
Local time: 17:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 36
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Changes made by editors
Nov 21, 2013 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
FieldOther » Bus/Financial
Field (specific)General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters » Idioms / Maxims / Sayings


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