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Anrede

English translation: Not really an answer!

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08:42 Jul 19, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Internet, e-Commerce
German term or phrase: Anrede
On a form where users have to choose between Mr., Mrs., Ms., Miss, etc.

What do we call that in English? My dic. has "form of address" but I don't think that's what we really call it....

Any ideas?
Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 00:38
English translation:Not really an answer!
Explanation:
Just didn\'t have the space in the comment box ...

I have a form sitting next to me on my desk from the DVLA. It avoids the issue nicely by not putting it anything at all. If you have the choice of different options, it\'s going to be pretty obvious what they are.

If it\'s one you can\'t skip, then I\'d go with \'title\'. I don\'t think that means you have to have any sort of academic title, and anything else (form of address, salutation) sounds a bit weird. It probably depends on the type of form and your target audience.

FWIW

Mary
Selected response from:

Mary Worby
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:38
Grading comment
That's why I don't remember seeing it in this form - it's usally just left out if you can only choose between Mr/Mrs. So that's how I'll translate it - by leaving it out.

Thanks Mary.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +6title
Klaus Herrmann
4 +4form of address
Cilian O'Tuama
4salutation
AmiHH
3AddressChris Rowson
3Not really an answer!
Mary Worby
1"title", a bit reluctantlyDan McCrosky


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
form of address


Explanation:
is fine

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Note added at 2002-07-19 08:49:09 (GMT)
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you can hardly use \"title\" here, more for Dr., Prof. etc.

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Note added at 2002-07-19 08:59:59 (GMT)
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http://www.hants.gov.uk/lieutenancy/etiquette.html

Etiquette
What is the correct form of address for the Lord-Lieutenant?
Written: Mrs Mary Fagan JP, HM Lord-Lieutenant of Hampshire
Salutation: \"Dear Lord-Lieutenant\"
In a Speech: in the preamble the Lord-Lieutenant is referred to as \"My Lord-Lieutenant\"
Conversation: Mrs Fagan likes to be addressed as \"Mrs Fagan\" or \"Lord-Lieutenant\"
Office Holder: A woman appointed to the office is correctly addressed as Lord-Lieutenant.


http://www.eastsussexcc.gov.uk/esussex/figures/etiquette.htm

The correct form of address for the Lord Lieutenant is as follows:
Written: Mrs Phyllida Stewart-Roberts OBE, HM Lord Lieutenant of East Sussex
Salutation: \"Dear Lord Lieutenant\"
In Speech: In the preamble the Lord Lieutenant is referred to as \"My Lord Lieutenant\"
In Conversation: Mrs Stewart-Roberts likes to be addressed as \"Mrs Stewart-Roberts\" or \"Lord Lieutenant\"
Office Holder: A woman appointed to the Office is correctly addressed as \"Lord Lieutenant\"

and many more


Cilian O'Tuama
Local time: 00:38
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxhartran
13 mins

agree  Elvira Stoianov
15 mins

neutral  Mary Worby: Form of address brings to my mind exactly what your examples suggest ... what is the correct form of address for a prime minister, bishop, etc.? I can't remember seeing it on forms, but then I probably don't read them all that carefully! (-:
45 mins

agree  Terry Gilman: Letitia Baldridge (Kennedy administration) says "title" for Mr./Ms. ..., "professional title" for Dr., J.D. ..., and "form of address" for the items above ("Your Excellency," ...).
4 hrs

agree  stefana
11 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +6
title


Explanation:
The forms I remember used title to describe this line. However, each of the forms had "Dr." as another option.

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Note added at 2002-07-19 09:00:04 (GMT)
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Actually, that\'s another suggestion: Check one.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-19 09:19:07 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I\'m not going to scan the forms I have, but here are some online forms:
https://www.ua2go.com/ci/JoinMileagePlus.jsp
http://www.powerlab-teaching.com/register.php

Just did a Google search for \"registration form title\" - yep, I maintain my two suggestions.


Klaus Herrmann
Germany
Local time: 00:38
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rebekka Groß: That's the one!
0 min

agree  fcl
1 min

neutral  Cilian O'Tuama: "Mr." isn't a title, "Dr." is. To me, a title is something you earn and don't just merit by virtue of age/sex etc.
4 mins
  -> Yes, I share your view, but still I've seen it on forms, almost as often as 'check one:'

agree  jerrie: Just looked at my travel insurance form...it is title. Title/Initial/Surname
7 mins

agree  Rolf Klischewski, M.A.: Yup, same in Outlook. So it must be true! (C:
9 mins

neutral  xxxhartran: from Google:. The correct forms of address such as Mr. or Mrs. and the appropriate gestures ....
17 mins

agree  Mary Worby: Think this is safest and most easily understandable (-:
37 mins

agree  Manfred Mondt: beginners will translate this back as Titel.
4 hrs
  -> :-))
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Address


Explanation:
is what I think we call it.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-19 08:54:32 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It used to be \"title\" when the world was organised for the convenience of people with titles. But not any more, I think.

Chris Rowson
Local time: 00:38
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Cilian O'Tuama: IMO only as verb
3 mins

neutral  Mary Worby: Think this is confusing in forms .. if I were asked my address I'd tell people where I lived! (-:
20 mins
  -> You are right. Again! :-)
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Not really an answer!


Explanation:
Just didn\'t have the space in the comment box ...

I have a form sitting next to me on my desk from the DVLA. It avoids the issue nicely by not putting it anything at all. If you have the choice of different options, it\'s going to be pretty obvious what they are.

If it\'s one you can\'t skip, then I\'d go with \'title\'. I don\'t think that means you have to have any sort of academic title, and anything else (form of address, salutation) sounds a bit weird. It probably depends on the type of form and your target audience.

FWIW

Mary

Mary Worby
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:38
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28
Grading comment
That's why I don't remember seeing it in this form - it's usally just left out if you can only choose between Mr/Mrs. So that's how I'll translate it - by leaving it out.

Thanks Mary.
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26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
salutation


Explanation:
Way back when in high school when we were doing form letters, we usually created a field called salutation. Then in the database, we would enter either Mr., Miss, Mrs., Ms., Dr., Fr., or whatever. I don't know if this was correct, but this is what we did. Also, I had the very same context this morning in a translation and I put salutation. I have not turned it in yet. Avoiding putting anything would also be away around it.

AmiHH
Germany
Local time: 00:38
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
"title", a bit reluctantly


Explanation:
"title", a bit reluctantly

I've also had many battles with this matter. There seems to be no easy way out.

IMO "salutation" is only for letters. "Form of address" sounds best to me but is a bit long for a form. I don't much like "title" for the reasons mentioned above concerning earning or appointment, but NODE – The New Oxford Dictionary of English writes for Mrs, Mr, Miss and Ms:

"a TITLE used before a surname or full name to address or refer to a person without a higher or honorific or professional TITLE"

The Chicago Manual of Style refers to these gizmos as "social TITLEs", whatever they are.

Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary says for Mr.:

"used as a conventional TITLE of courtesy except when usage requires the substitution of a TITLE of rank or an honorific or professional title before a man's surname <spoke to Mr. Doe>"

I filled out a form recently that handled the problem nicely by writing:

"Please click/choose (for electronic completion) (or `circle´ for manual completion) one:

Ms, Mr, Miss, Dr, Prof, None"

Of course, for US consumption, TCMS still stupidly lists such abbreviations with periods (full stops) after the abbreviation.

The method mentioned in your question and the one I've just described both fall apart as soon as someone with a military grade or rank starts to fill in the form.

It would be a mark of real courage to go against all four;

1. NODE

2. being concise,

3. TCMS, and

4. Webster

so you might be forced to choose "title". "Title" also has the advantage that although some people might feel you are upgrading everyday people, at least you are not downgrading all the professors and doctors.

HTH

Dan


Dan McCrosky
Local time: 00:38
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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Changes made by editors
May 29, 2006 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
FieldOther » Tech/Engineering
Field (specific)(none) » Internet, e-Commerce


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