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Abs. 1

English translation: Section/Article/§ xxx para/para. yyy / Section xxx (yyy)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:§ xxx Abs. yyy
English translation:Section/Article/§ xxx para/para. yyy / Section xxx (yyy)
Entered by: silfilla
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

19:35 Jul 26, 2005
German to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Contract(s)
German term or phrase: Abs. 1
§1
Abs. 1

Wie übersetzt man Absatz 1?
ninarrow1
Germany
Local time: 06:57
para / para.
Explanation:
:-)

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Note added at 11 mins (2005-07-26 19:46:52 GMT)
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In the US:

§ = § / article / section (esp. icw laws)

Abs. = paragraph, written para or para.

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Note added at 12 mins (2005-07-26 19:48:21 GMT)
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and \"clause\" is used primarily for \"Satz\" (in the US)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 25 mins (2005-07-26 20:01:17 GMT)
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oh ... icw = in connection with ;-)

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Note added at 17 hrs 29 mins (2005-07-27 13:05:19 GMT)
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And, yes, Robin\'s suggestion is also correct. But IMO it works in a translation only if you also define and decide how you\'re going to abbreviate numbered clauses, subclauses, etc. etc. And that can be a can of worms, not to mention that the abbreviated version doesn\'t work in all sentences. IMO this is best reserved for translations of entire acts and the like. In that case, please create a table, both for your own reference and for the client. :-)
Selected response from:

silfilla
Local time: 00:57
Grading comment
Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +6para / para.silfilla
3 +2section
EdithK
5(1)/subsection 1RobinB
4clauseDavid Warren


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Absatz -juristisch (nicht paragraph!)
section


Explanation:
wenn nicht paragraph

EdithK
Switzerland
Local time: 06:57
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 303

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yvonne Becker
2 mins

agree  silvia glatzhofer: what you usually see is "sec. 1 (1)"
4 mins

neutral  silfilla: not in the US; section is Artikel // she didn't; she used "Paragraph" (capitalized) the way Germans use that term to refer to an article or section of a law ... e.g. Paragraph 175
6 mins
  -> True, but asker declined para(graph) from the very start. I just answered the question.

neutral  Trans-Marie: In diesem Zusammenhang waere section = §.
18 mins
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Absatz -juristisch (nicht paragraph!)
clause


Explanation:
I would suggest clause.

David Warren
Local time: 00:57
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
Absatz -juristisch (nicht paragraph!)
para / para.


Explanation:
:-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2005-07-26 19:46:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In the US:

§ = § / article / section (esp. icw laws)

Abs. = paragraph, written para or para.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2005-07-26 19:48:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

and \"clause\" is used primarily for \"Satz\" (in the US)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 25 mins (2005-07-26 20:01:17 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

oh ... icw = in connection with ;-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 hrs 29 mins (2005-07-27 13:05:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And, yes, Robin\'s suggestion is also correct. But IMO it works in a translation only if you also define and decide how you\'re going to abbreviate numbered clauses, subclauses, etc. etc. And that can be a can of worms, not to mention that the abbreviated version doesn\'t work in all sentences. IMO this is best reserved for translations of entire acts and the like. In that case, please create a table, both for your own reference and for the client. :-)

silfilla
Local time: 00:57
Specializes in field
PRO pts in category: 300
Grading comment
Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Brie Vernier: It is paragraph; § is section
6 mins
  -> yes

agree  Trans-Marie
18 mins
  -> thanks

agree  Lisa Davey
31 mins
  -> thanks

agree  Astrid Elke Witte: Yes, this is the correct answer.
37 mins
  -> thanks :-)

neutral  EdithK: Asker specifically declined para(graph).
59 mins

agree  Will Matter
1 hr

agree  Michael Kucharski
12 hrs
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
(1)/subsection 1


Explanation:
§ 1 Abs. 1 = section 1(1), whereby (1) means "subsection 1".

Although the § symbol is certainly used in the US, specifically in e.g. USC, it's best practice to stick to the European (i.e. UK) legal notation for German laws, many of which have UK counterparts because of EU legislation. This is also how it will appear in the 4th edition of Brooks/Mertin, due to be published in (I hope) September this year.

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Note added at 1 day 13 hrs 36 mins (2005-07-28 09:12:24 GMT)
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To pick up on Silfilla\'s suggestion, the sequence is as follows:

Abschnitt = part
Unterabschnitt = subpart
§ = section (s.)
Abs. = subsection, whereby the number is placed in brackets
Nr. = no.
Satz = sentence (this isn\'t a clause, but literally a grammatical sentence. German laws refer to sentences, which of course contain clauses in the grammatical sense).
Halbsatz = half-sentence
Teilsatz = clause (now we can use \"clause\"!)

Examples:
§ 254 Abs. 4 = section 254(4)
§ 253 Abs. 2 Satz 3 = section 253(2) sentence 3
Abs. 2 = subsection (2)
§ 258 Nr. 2 bis 8 Buchstabe a = section 258 nos. 2–8(a)

The point is that below the subsection level, German laws use a different notation to Anglo-American laws. It\'s vital to preserve the notation so that direct reference can be made to the relevant text.

RobinB
Germany
Local time: 06:57
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 34
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Changes made by editors
Jul 26, 2005 - Changes made by Marcus Malabad:
Term askedAbsatz -juristisch (nicht paragraph!) » Abs. 1


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