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das Gericht hat für R e c h t erkannt

English translation: It is ordered that/as follows:

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:das Gericht hat für R e c h t erkannt
English translation:It is ordered that/as follows:
Entered by: Nicole Trebbin
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

17:57 Nov 15, 2013
German to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general)
German term or phrase: das Gericht hat für R e c h t erkannt
Aus einem Scheidungsurteil.

...hat das Gericht für R e c h t erkannt: ...
Nicole Trebbin
Germany
Local time: 08:06
It is ordered that/as follows:
Explanation:
From the wording used in the majority of English County Court orders
But there are as many variations as there are courts and EN-spkg jurisdictions
Selected response from:

AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:06
Grading comment
Thank you!
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1It is ordered that/as follows:
AllegroTrans
5 -1the court has ordered, adjudged and decreed
Kirsten Kohlwey
Summary of reference entries provided
See glossary
Kim Metzger

  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
the court has ordered, adjudged and decreed


Explanation:
from my own divorce decree

Kirsten Kohlwey
United States
Local time: 00:06
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  philgoddard: It's hard to argue with a real divorce decree, but I'm going to :-) Using three words instead of one is unnecessary.
38 mins

disagree  gangels: nobody uses 'adjudged' in a formal order
20 hrs

neutral  Peter Manda: to note that "adjudged" is often used by judges in U.S. courts and decrees; for example, in the 2d Circuit: https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=2d circ...
1 day19 hrs
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
It is ordered that/as follows:


Explanation:
From the wording used in the majority of English County Court orders
But there are as many variations as there are courts and EN-spkg jurisdictions

AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:06
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 147
Grading comment
Thank you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  gangels: usually, the court ENTERS an order
15 hrs
  -> Thanks: the court enters a judgment, but it is ordered that" is commonly used heading and "enters" would not appear here
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Reference comments


4 mins peer agreement (net): +4
Reference: See glossary

Reference information:
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/german_to_english/law_general/2081...

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Note added at 5 mins (2013-11-15 18:03:25 GMT)
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Just enter "für Recht." There are several entries.

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1208

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  writeaway
14 mins
agree  Kent Hyde: I agree, but I would tend to write it in present tense in the translation, depending on the actual context.
33 mins
agree  philgoddard
40 mins
agree  Peter Manda
1 day19 hrs
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