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betriebsbedingte Kündigung

English translation: termination of employment for operational reasons

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:betriebsbedingte Kündigung
English translation:termination of employment for operational reasons
Entered by: Ralf Lemster
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

05:05 Nov 23, 2001
German to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Law (general) / employment law / HR
German term or phrase: betriebsbedingte Kündigung
Technical term for the termination of employment due to reasons within the enterprise (e.g. business problems).
Ralf Lemster
Germany
Local time: 06:10
termination of employment for operational reasons
Explanation:
I'd go with one of the options offered by Dietl/Lorenz or Romain:

"termination of employment for operational reasons" (Dietl/Lorenz)

"business structure dismissal"; "dismissal due to operational requirements" (Romain)

"Redundancy" has the same connotation => (betriebsbedingte) Entlassung wg. Arbeitsmangels, Umstrukturierung (Dietl/Lorenz), I prefer, however, the very first option as "redundancy" - much like betriebsbedingte Kündigung - has become a set concept under British law, involving a number of specific requirements that do not necessarily have an equivalent under the German concept of betriebsbedingte Kündigung (and vice versa).

To avoid the impression that both concepts are identical I would avoid a term describing an existing concept under British law and opt for the translation that reflects the German concept without purporting to be the British equivalent.

Having said that, this only applies to contracts / legal documents - there is nothing wrong with using the term "redundancy" in a newspaper article, for example.
Selected response from:

Beate Lutzebaeck
New Zealand
Local time: 18:10
Grading comment
Thanks again - as I pointed out in my query, I was specifically looking for a legal 'terminus technicus', which is why this one fits best.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3given notice for business reasonsxxxpaulagee
5"redundancy" or termination because of operational reasons
Kathleen
5termination of employment for operational reasonsBeate Lutzebaeck
4 +1laid off
jccantrell
4redundancy
pschmitt


  

Answers


3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
given notice for business reasons


Explanation:
It would be easier to have the whole sentence. You can also say business related redundancy or made redundant for business reasons

xxxpaulagee
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:10

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ursula Peter-Czichi: Sounds good! There has been the identical question about a month ago.
16 mins

agree  Thijs van Dorssen
17 mins

agree  Eva Blanar
23 mins

neutral  pschmitt: Just "redundancy", since it's business related by nature
1 hr
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
redundancy


Explanation:
This sounds pretty much like a "redundancy" to me.
HTH

pschmitt
Local time: 05:10
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
laid off


Explanation:
In the USA, an employee is laid off almost exclusively due to a drop off in the business. In contrast, an employee who is terminated for cause (e.g., stealing from his employer) is said to have been 'fired.'


jccantrell
United States
Local time: 21:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 79

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  pschmitt
5 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
termination of employment for operational reasons


Explanation:
I'd go with one of the options offered by Dietl/Lorenz or Romain:

"termination of employment for operational reasons" (Dietl/Lorenz)

"business structure dismissal"; "dismissal due to operational requirements" (Romain)

"Redundancy" has the same connotation => (betriebsbedingte) Entlassung wg. Arbeitsmangels, Umstrukturierung (Dietl/Lorenz), I prefer, however, the very first option as "redundancy" - much like betriebsbedingte Kündigung - has become a set concept under British law, involving a number of specific requirements that do not necessarily have an equivalent under the German concept of betriebsbedingte Kündigung (and vice versa).

To avoid the impression that both concepts are identical I would avoid a term describing an existing concept under British law and opt for the translation that reflects the German concept without purporting to be the British equivalent.

Having said that, this only applies to contracts / legal documents - there is nothing wrong with using the term "redundancy" in a newspaper article, for example.


    Relevant experience
Beate Lutzebaeck
New Zealand
Local time: 18:10
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 239
Grading comment
Thanks again - as I pointed out in my query, I was specifically looking for a legal 'terminus technicus', which is why this one fits best.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
"redundancy" or termination because of operational reasons


Explanation:
I must agree wtih the chosen usage. This is applied legally in Germany, especially the eastern Bundesländer, and has been upheld by the German Arbeitsgericht(Labor Court). I have personal, relevant experience!.

Kathleen
Local time: 21:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Kim Metzger: "for ... reasons" is vastly preferable to "because of ... reasons."
2132 days
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Changes made by editors
Jul 23, 2012 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
FieldLaw/Patents » Bus/Financial
Field (specific)(none) » Law (general)


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