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§ 1

English translation: This depends on the type of text!

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03:26 Jun 9, 2001
German to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
German term or phrase: § 1
Do we use this symbol for Paragraph? Or just Para.
Gillian Searl
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:59
English translation:This depends on the type of text!
Explanation:
Normally, where Germans (or Scandinavians, for that matter!) would use the § + the number at the beginning or above the text of a "§", British people would just put the number.

Within the text, it is called various things, depending on the type of text.

In an act: section
In a contract or a bill: clause
In a treaty etc.: article

During my 20 years as a translator, I have seldom if ever seen "§" in an English text.

Here is the beginning af section two of the Building Societies Act, 1960:

"2. -(1) If a building society in any financial year in which it may make special advances up to the limit specified in subsection (4) of section one of this Act, or ...."

I hope this helps. I am sure you can a text on the web that corresponds to the one you are translating. Good luck!


Selected response from:

Randi Stenstrop
Local time: 01:59
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naYes
Yngve Roennike
naThis depends on the type of text!Randi Stenstrop
naYES
Nada Endres, Mag.


  

Answers


4 mins
YES


Explanation:
we do use § Symbol

Nada Endres, Mag.
Austria
Local time: 01:59
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Gunsou: wrong answer by non-native jack-of-all-trades type of translator
1 day 12 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
This depends on the type of text!


Explanation:
Normally, where Germans (or Scandinavians, for that matter!) would use the § + the number at the beginning or above the text of a "§", British people would just put the number.

Within the text, it is called various things, depending on the type of text.

In an act: section
In a contract or a bill: clause
In a treaty etc.: article

During my 20 years as a translator, I have seldom if ever seen "§" in an English text.

Here is the beginning af section two of the Building Societies Act, 1960:

"2. -(1) If a building society in any financial year in which it may make special advances up to the limit specified in subsection (4) of section one of this Act, or ...."

I hope this helps. I am sure you can a text on the web that corresponds to the one you are translating. Good luck!




Randi Stenstrop
Local time: 01:59
Native speaker of: Danish
PRO pts in pair: 265

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
DPS: Sirius is right
1 hr

Astrid Elke Witte: I agree with these comments.
2 hrs

Gunsou
1 day 10 hrs

pds
1 day 17 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs
Yes


Explanation:
It stands for section not paragraph, which is abbreviated para.


    x
Yngve Roennike
Local time: 19:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 34
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