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Logozusatz

English translation: Brand/product pay-off

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09:17 Jan 10, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Marketing / Corporate Design handbook
German term or phrase: Logozusatz
Die Logozusätze
A Zusatz to the logo defines the impression in a lasting way that a product or a brand wishes to convey to the public. The Logozusatz creates the opportunity to pass on a factual but also emotional statement together with the logo and thereby to “connect the product with a feeling”.
Use of the logo with the Logozusatz “ the way to display”
Internally (i.e. for internal printed matter) the logo is depicted without a Zusatz. When using the logo for external publications, the logo may also be depicted with the Zusatz “way to go”.
The “way to go” Logozusatz can only be used as depicted below.

Is called a tag line? Thanks
Gillian Searl
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:31
English translation:Brand/product pay-off
Explanation:
Just for the advertising record, here is the distinction between the various terms

A tag-line (USA terminology also used in international Advertising agencies in the UK) is the "slogan" or set of words that close an advertisement or TV commercial eg:
Colgate Ultrabright - a whiter, brighter smile every time.

A pay-off is the sumation or the resume of the promise or proposition that a brand or product wishes to leave with the target audience and, in the case of brands ( unless the campaign has the aim of re-positioning or retouching the brand values in the consumers' mind) normally does not change even if the execution of the ad campaign or commercial does; for example Mars: A Mars a day helps you work rest and play ( Bei Arbeit, Sport und Spiel Mars etc.

"Slogan" is a generic term that can refer a corporate pay-off, a headline or campaign tag line.

A distillation of 17 years in Agency Client Service.

Ciao

Alison


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Note added at 2002-01-10 15:55:30 (GMT)
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Gillian, I had a look at easyjet.com - The easyjet is the corporate name that has been given a semi logo form ( i.e. it has a distinctive font) just like coca-cola is the brand name and is recognisable thanks to the \"wave script\". \"The web\'s favorite airline is the corporate pay-off. ( By the way this has been \"adapted\" from the British Airways pay-off \"The Worlds Favourire Airline\". In advertising anything goes until they a legal studio sends you a nasty letter. Hope the concept is clear. Alison

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Note added at 2002-01-10 16:01:18 (GMT)
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Sorry about the typos in the previous contribution. I only wanted to add that company logos can be names made to look distinctive or unique in someway like Coca-cola or coke or Audi lettering or they can incorporate a symbol or a graphic device (the coke wave or the Malboro red and white inverted \"V\") Mercedes Benz circle and 3-intersect symbol.
Selected response from:

Alison kennedy
Local time: 12:31
Grading comment
I'll defer to your advertising experience though I'm not a 100% convinced!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5sloganBeate Lutzebaeck
4Gillian look at my post-postings on posting page.Alison kennedy
4Brand/product pay-offAlison kennedy
4logo-tag or tag on the logo
Kathi Stock


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
logo-tag or tag on the logo


Explanation:
..my instant guess

Kathi Stock
United States
Local time: 05:31
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 789
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
slogan


Explanation:
... from the top of my head ... tag line would work too, though

Beate Lutzebaeck
New Zealand
Local time: 00:31
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2079

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tao Weber: absolutely
10 mins

agree  Bob Kerns
1 hr

agree  Ursula Peter-Czichi
1 hr

agree  Claudia Tomaschek
2 hrs

agree  Thomas Bollmann
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Brand/product pay-off


Explanation:
Just for the advertising record, here is the distinction between the various terms

A tag-line (USA terminology also used in international Advertising agencies in the UK) is the "slogan" or set of words that close an advertisement or TV commercial eg:
Colgate Ultrabright - a whiter, brighter smile every time.

A pay-off is the sumation or the resume of the promise or proposition that a brand or product wishes to leave with the target audience and, in the case of brands ( unless the campaign has the aim of re-positioning or retouching the brand values in the consumers' mind) normally does not change even if the execution of the ad campaign or commercial does; for example Mars: A Mars a day helps you work rest and play ( Bei Arbeit, Sport und Spiel Mars etc.

"Slogan" is a generic term that can refer a corporate pay-off, a headline or campaign tag line.

A distillation of 17 years in Agency Client Service.

Ciao

Alison


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-10 15:55:30 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Gillian, I had a look at easyjet.com - The easyjet is the corporate name that has been given a semi logo form ( i.e. it has a distinctive font) just like coca-cola is the brand name and is recognisable thanks to the \"wave script\". \"The web\'s favorite airline is the corporate pay-off. ( By the way this has been \"adapted\" from the British Airways pay-off \"The Worlds Favourire Airline\". In advertising anything goes until they a legal studio sends you a nasty letter. Hope the concept is clear. Alison

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-10 16:01:18 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry about the typos in the previous contribution. I only wanted to add that company logos can be names made to look distinctive or unique in someway like Coca-cola or coke or Audi lettering or they can incorporate a symbol or a graphic device (the coke wave or the Malboro red and white inverted \"V\") Mercedes Benz circle and 3-intersect symbol.

Alison kennedy
Local time: 12:31
PRO pts in pair: 12
Grading comment
I'll defer to your advertising experience though I'm not a 100% convinced!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Gillian look at my post-postings on posting page.


Explanation:
I don't know whether further posting comments are sent on. If this is not the case, take a look at your posting page again to see my comments to your question.

Alison

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Note added at 2002-01-11 07:08:45 (GMT)
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Another two alternatives have come to mind over night, just to complete the terminology: \"Company/corporate/product/brand claim - that refers to the words eg. \"Vorsprung durch Technik\", while the whole lot (logo and claim or pay-off) is often referred to a the \"sign-off\". Another point in your text while I\'m on line: normally you talk about \"rational\" as opposed to factual content vs \" emotive\" as opposed to emotional that means something else. You could substitute emotional with \"with emotional appeal\".

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Note added at 2002-01-14 13:19:07 (GMT) Post-grading
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Gillian- thanks for the honest approach. Advertising lingo can be very strange for someone who has never worked on the inside. Have a look at this site I found that specialises in this area www.adslogans.co.uk/index.html. They suggest \"slogo\" for the slogan or claim used with the logo. This sounds just a bit too UK ad industry for me. Regards

Alison

Alison kennedy
Local time: 12:31
PRO pts in pair: 12
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