Laugebrezel

English translation: soft pretzel

00:24 Jan 17, 2003
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
Marketing / baked goods
German term or phrase: Laugebrezel
A document with both "Laugebrezel" and "Brezel" listed as terms, not to mention the great come-back with "Laugengebaeck", if you think you can throw that in as a freebie.

I know that the general translation is 'pretzel', but how can I differentiate?? Maybe I'm just up too late...
Kaiya J. Diannen
Australia
English translation:soft pretzel
Explanation:
These are usually the fresh, soft and tasty pretzels right from the backery (Delicious!). The general term "Brezel", I would just refer to as "pretzel(s)". As for "Laugengebäck", this is the catchall for all pretzel-like baked goods, including soft pretzel sticks ("Laugenstangen"- not to be confused with regular pretzel sticks "Salzstangen"), pretzel rolls ("Laugenbrötchen" - taste great with cheese, a slice of cuke, tomato and mayonaise) and the aforementioned soft pretzel. Depending on the context, you may want to refer to "Laugengebäck" as "baked pretzel products".

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Note added at 2003-01-17 00:51:39 (GMT)
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Here\'s the German counterpart to the English website referenced:
http://www.ditsch.de/produkte/ditsch/laugenbrezel.shtml

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Note added at 2003-01-17 09:52:53 (GMT)
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P.S. Spelling? I\'m assuming you are looking for the standard \"Laugenbrezel\" and not some dialectal variation referred to as \"Laugebrezel\". Either way, I\'m standing by \"soft pretzel\".
Selected response from:

goemia
Local time: 18:50
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone, you all gave so much info! I'm not 100% sure how I'm going to finally combine the answers, but this one seems to cover all the bases. Although I must say - the German pretzels I've had are definitely NOT comparable to the good old US "soft pretzels" sold in every shopping mall (I really miss them!)!! Also thanks to Rebecca, because although I understand the "alkaline" reference, "salt pretzel" sounds much more edible (!) and may go in the final mix somewhere...
(also, thanks for catching that typo guys!)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4Found on a website
Trudy Peters
3 +4soft pretzel
goemia
5Laugengebaeck
Teresa Reinhardt
4 +1Another stab at trying to explain it
Nicole Tata
4salt pretzel
Rebecca Holmes
3Laugenbrezel and Bretzel
writeaway


  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Found on a website


Explanation:
Laugebrezl m.: swabian speciality (brown alkaline-pretzel); the best ones are available at Bakery Waible - Schtuagerd, Bakery Frank - Schtuagerd (Bad Cannstatt), and Bakery Reinhard - Strümpfelbach. And elsewhere?


    Reference: http://www.schwaebisch-englisch.de
Trudy Peters
United States
Local time: 12:50
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 3087

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Teresa Reinhardt: Yes, and Salt Lake City around 400 S 200E
2 hrs

agree  Cécile Kellermayr
7 hrs

agree  Elisabeth Ghysels: the essence is: alkaline! Lauge = alkaline solution; in this case it's simply sodium bicarbonate, into which the pretzels etc. are dipped before being baked. Greetings from another Schwoab
7 hrs

agree  Chris Rowson: Right "brown alkaline pretzel", confirms the Swabian Blumenbär, and "Laugengebäck" is "brown alkaline goodies" (she says) - when further questioned: "eat it, don´t talk about it". :-)
13 hrs
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
soft pretzel


Explanation:
These are usually the fresh, soft and tasty pretzels right from the backery (Delicious!). The general term "Brezel", I would just refer to as "pretzel(s)". As for "Laugengebäck", this is the catchall for all pretzel-like baked goods, including soft pretzel sticks ("Laugenstangen"- not to be confused with regular pretzel sticks "Salzstangen"), pretzel rolls ("Laugenbrötchen" - taste great with cheese, a slice of cuke, tomato and mayonaise) and the aforementioned soft pretzel. Depending on the context, you may want to refer to "Laugengebäck" as "baked pretzel products".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-17 00:51:39 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here\'s the German counterpart to the English website referenced:
http://www.ditsch.de/produkte/ditsch/laugenbrezel.shtml

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-17 09:52:53 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

P.S. Spelling? I\'m assuming you are looking for the standard \"Laugenbrezel\" and not some dialectal variation referred to as \"Laugebrezel\". Either way, I\'m standing by \"soft pretzel\".


    Reference: http://english.ditsch.de/produkte/ditsch/laugenbrezel.shtml
goemia
Local time: 18:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone, you all gave so much info! I'm not 100% sure how I'm going to finally combine the answers, but this one seems to cover all the bases. Although I must say - the German pretzels I've had are definitely NOT comparable to the good old US "soft pretzels" sold in every shopping mall (I really miss them!)!! Also thanks to Rebecca, because although I understand the "alkaline" reference, "salt pretzel" sounds much more edible (!) and may go in the final mix somewhere...
(also, thanks for catching that typo guys!)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nancy Arrowsmith
1 hr

agree  ezbounty@aol.co
1 hr

agree  Martina Keskintepe
6 hrs

agree  Lori Dendy-Molz
8 hrs

disagree  Chris Rowson: Meine Frau sagt dies ist falsch, es ist eine Schwäbische Spezialität, und der Ditsch weißt nichts davon.
13 hrs
  -> My word! Janet did say it was a typo...

agree  allemande: Laugenbrezen (mit 'n', ohne 'l') sind auch eine beliebte Nuernberger Spezialitaet (
16 hrs
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Laugenbrezel and Bretzel


Explanation:
Seem to be used in German. Bretzel are the big doughy pretzels, Laugenbrezels are similar dough in a way, but long and straight shaped I think.

A Laugenbretzel is an example of what Americans mistakenly refer to as ´pretzels´. It is a big, crunchy snack with a soft center and salt on top. Usually served with beer and cheese. Comes from Bavaria.
http://german.lifetips.com/PPF/Tipid/16637/TipNL.aspCommerci...

- Bretzel Bakery, 1a Lennox Street, South Circular Road, Dublin 8
McPeake Auctioneers | Commercial | Bretzel Bakery, 1a Lennox Street, South ...
www.mcpeakeauctioneers.com/ flat_areaEQLAMParea_codeEQL414AMPContentIDEQL2659AMPxTemplateEQLprintable_entr

writeaway
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1175
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Laugengebaeck


Explanation:
Same dough/"topping" (no flames, I'm from Schtuegerd) is also used to make rolls and breadsticks (Laugabreetle and Laugastanga [Laugenbroetchen und Laugenstangen)

Teresa Reinhardt
United States
Local time: 09:50
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4290
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
salt pretzel


Explanation:
This is the entry in for Laugenbrezel in Langenscheidt's Großwörterbuch.

Rebecca Holmes
United States
Local time: 12:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 476
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Another stab at trying to explain it


Explanation:
Brezel is a general term describing pretzel-shaped food items. There are sweet doughy ones (Zuckerbrezel), savoury doughy ones (Laugenbrezel, Käsebrezel etc) and then there are the little hard crunchy snack ones (Salzbrezel). The savoury ones are most popular and hence often abbreviated to just ‘Brezel’, just to complicate matters further. PRETZELS in English is usually taken to mean the salty variety, and that’s okay as long as your text does not mention sweet pretzels. Perhaps ‘SWEET AND SAVOURY PRETZELS’ could be used if you need to include both.

Laugenbrezel is a Southern German (and Austrian) speciality and is essentially what English speakers would call ‘pretzels’. They are not stick-shaped (= Laugenstangen) or any other shape, but simply pretzel shaped. The point here is that they are salty (Lauge = alkaline solution). Muret Sanders suggests SALTY PRETZELS and I think that works fine.

Laugengebäck is the general term for bakery items made out of (salty) pretzel dough such as pretzel sticks (Laugenstangen) and rolls (Laugenbrötchen, -wecken). I would use PRETZEL PASTRIES.

I’m getting hungry now.

Finally, no references are included as I grew up with the damn things!

hope it helps



Nicole Tata
Local time: 17:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 1326

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Trudy Peters: Nice explanation. The crunchy snack ones are what "Dubya" choked on :-)
4 hrs
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