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Wachkomapatient

English translation: persistive vegitative state/appalic patient

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Wachkomapatient
English translation:persistive vegitative state/appalic patient
Entered by: Rebecca Holmes
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08:41 Jan 29, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
Marketing
German term or phrase: Wachkomapatient
A text about an exhibition given by an order of nuns in an effort to show what it is they do and to attract young people to their work.
I have no idea what a Wachkomapatient is. Are they awake but in a coma?

Ton und Licht bilden den atmosphärischen Hintergrund. Aus einer Tafelbox erfährt man ganz alltägliche Fragen an einen Wachkomapatienten
Rebecca Holmes
United States
Local time: 06:09
persistive vegitative state or "awake coma"
Explanation:
"Coma And Persistent Vegetative StateWhat Is It?
Symptoms
Diagnosis
Expected Duration
Prevention
Treatment
When To Call A Professional
Prognosis
Additional Info


What Is It?

Coma is a deep and prolonged state of unconsciousness resulting from disease, injury or poisoning. The word coma usually refers to the state in which a person appears to be asleep, but cannot be awakened. There also is another type of coma, called persistent vegetative state or awake coma, in which the person appears to be awake, but does not respond to the outside world. In this type of coma, the person's eyes may be open and there may be some yawning, grunting or other vocalizations. In both cases, the patient is alive, but the brain does not function fully.

Some causes of coma include:

Head trauma, such as might be sustained in a car accident, sports injury or falling injury
Complication of an underlying disease, such as seizure disorder, diabetes, or liver or kidney failure
Poisoning, usually involving an overdose of drugs that depress the nervous system, such as tranquilizers or alcohol
Stroke
Symptoms

A person in a coma will be unconscious and unable to communicate, but still breathing and alive. The person cannot be aroused from this state.

Diagnosis

Coma is easy to diagnose because the signs of unconsciousness and unresponsiveness are clear. The cause of the coma can be more difficult to determine.

When coma results from traumatic head injury, the cause usually is clear from the injuries. Other clues to the cause of coma may be available from the people who called for help. For example, observers can tell health-care providers whether the person took a large quantity of medication, what symptoms occurred immediately preceding the coma, and how quickly the person lost consciousness. Doctors also will want to know about the patient's medical history, because some disorders can lead to coma, including diabetes, seizure disorder and a history of heart, lung, liver, kidney or other disease. A physical examination can give other clues. For example, very small (pinpoint) pupils that do not react to bright light are seen in narcotic overdose.

Specific tests that may be used to diagnose coma include:

Blood and urine tests to check for disease, metabolic disorders or toxins
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) scans to look for bleeding in the brain, tumors, infection or stroke from decreased blood flow
Electroencephalogram (EEG), a graph of the electrical output of the brain that may indicate a metabolic imbalance or persistent seizure activity
Lumbar puncture (spinal tap) to examine the cerebrospinal fluid for signs of meningitis and encephalitis
Expected Duration

The duration of a coma depends on the cause, location, extent and severity of the damage to the brain. Coma can last hours or years, and can end with recovery or death. Some people who recover from a coma will have permanent physical or psychological disabilities. Some face years of rehabilitation, and others recover fully relatively quickly.

Prevention

Although coma sometimes cannot be prevented, most cases of coma can be prevented by using safety precautions. For example, many cases of head trauma could be prevented if more people drove safely, wore seat belts when riding in an automobile, and wore helmets when riding on a motorcycle or bicycle. Also, do not drive when drinking alcohol or taking sedating drugs. People with diabetes need to monitor their blood sugar levels often to avoid hypoglycemia. Many medications interact to decrease levels of consciousness, especially when mixed with any alcohol.

Treatment

Treatment starts with reducing further damage to the brain. Physicians will assure that the patient's airways are clear and that he or she is able to breathe. In some cases, the person will have to be put on a ventilator (a mechanical breathing machine).

Specific treatment will depend on the cause of the coma. For example, if the coma was caused by head trauma, efforts will be made to stop any bleeding or swelling in the brain. If the coma was caused by a metabolic imbalance, physicians will try to reverse it by treating the underlying condition. If poisoning caused the coma, physicians may give medications to counteract the depressive effects of the substance that caused the coma.

Once the person is appropriately treated for the immediate cause of coma, treatment will focus on supportive care. This usually includes making sure the person does not suffocate, making sure the person's muscles and ligaments stay flexible, providing adequate nutrition and preventing infections, such as pneumonia. Because a person in a coma cannot move on his or her own, it's important that his or her body be rotated periodically to prevent bedsores.

When To Call A Professional

Seek emergency care if a person appears to be unconscious, is unable to respond or cannot be awakened from a sleep.

Prognosis

The duration of a coma depends on the cause, extent and severity of the damage to the brain. Some people make a full recovery, others recover with some residual physical or intellectual effects, and others die of their injuries or condition. It is not always possible to predict who will recover and who will not. Recovery is more likely from a coma resulting from a metabolic disorder, such as diabetes, than from a coma resulting from trauma. People in a persistent vegetative state rarely recover. In general, the longer the coma, the more pessimistic the outlook.

People who awaken from a coma usually do so slowly, over days. Although comas rarely last longer than four weeks, some people can remain in a coma or persistent vegetative state for months or years.
"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-29 08:44:52 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

..... so now I have the proper medical term for my general condition in the morning before I\'ve had my first cup of tea..... ;-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-29 08:50:47 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Can also be called \"apallic state\" - see Edith\'s suggestion below.

\"Vegetative state



A state of permanent coma.

Referred to as the \"apallic syndrome\" in the German literature.

diffuse brain injury
Glascow Outcome Score
permanent
persistent\"

http://uscneurosurgery.com/glossary/v/vegetative state.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-29 08:51:38 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

em, I meant \"apallic syndrome\".... must go and get some more tea....
Selected response from:

Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 12:09
Grading comment
Thank you very much Allison and Edith. In the end I decided to go with Allison's "persistive vegitative state" as the exhibition was geared to the general public which might not understand the correct medial term as suggested by Edith, appalic patient. As both are entirely correct, however, I will enter both in the glossary. Thanks guys!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4persistive vegitative state or "awake coma"
Alison Schwitzgebel
5 +2apallic patient
EdithK


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
persistive vegitative state or "awake coma"


Explanation:
"Coma And Persistent Vegetative StateWhat Is It?
Symptoms
Diagnosis
Expected Duration
Prevention
Treatment
When To Call A Professional
Prognosis
Additional Info


What Is It?

Coma is a deep and prolonged state of unconsciousness resulting from disease, injury or poisoning. The word coma usually refers to the state in which a person appears to be asleep, but cannot be awakened. There also is another type of coma, called persistent vegetative state or awake coma, in which the person appears to be awake, but does not respond to the outside world. In this type of coma, the person's eyes may be open and there may be some yawning, grunting or other vocalizations. In both cases, the patient is alive, but the brain does not function fully.

Some causes of coma include:

Head trauma, such as might be sustained in a car accident, sports injury or falling injury
Complication of an underlying disease, such as seizure disorder, diabetes, or liver or kidney failure
Poisoning, usually involving an overdose of drugs that depress the nervous system, such as tranquilizers or alcohol
Stroke
Symptoms

A person in a coma will be unconscious and unable to communicate, but still breathing and alive. The person cannot be aroused from this state.

Diagnosis

Coma is easy to diagnose because the signs of unconsciousness and unresponsiveness are clear. The cause of the coma can be more difficult to determine.

When coma results from traumatic head injury, the cause usually is clear from the injuries. Other clues to the cause of coma may be available from the people who called for help. For example, observers can tell health-care providers whether the person took a large quantity of medication, what symptoms occurred immediately preceding the coma, and how quickly the person lost consciousness. Doctors also will want to know about the patient's medical history, because some disorders can lead to coma, including diabetes, seizure disorder and a history of heart, lung, liver, kidney or other disease. A physical examination can give other clues. For example, very small (pinpoint) pupils that do not react to bright light are seen in narcotic overdose.

Specific tests that may be used to diagnose coma include:

Blood and urine tests to check for disease, metabolic disorders or toxins
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) scans to look for bleeding in the brain, tumors, infection or stroke from decreased blood flow
Electroencephalogram (EEG), a graph of the electrical output of the brain that may indicate a metabolic imbalance or persistent seizure activity
Lumbar puncture (spinal tap) to examine the cerebrospinal fluid for signs of meningitis and encephalitis
Expected Duration

The duration of a coma depends on the cause, location, extent and severity of the damage to the brain. Coma can last hours or years, and can end with recovery or death. Some people who recover from a coma will have permanent physical or psychological disabilities. Some face years of rehabilitation, and others recover fully relatively quickly.

Prevention

Although coma sometimes cannot be prevented, most cases of coma can be prevented by using safety precautions. For example, many cases of head trauma could be prevented if more people drove safely, wore seat belts when riding in an automobile, and wore helmets when riding on a motorcycle or bicycle. Also, do not drive when drinking alcohol or taking sedating drugs. People with diabetes need to monitor their blood sugar levels often to avoid hypoglycemia. Many medications interact to decrease levels of consciousness, especially when mixed with any alcohol.

Treatment

Treatment starts with reducing further damage to the brain. Physicians will assure that the patient's airways are clear and that he or she is able to breathe. In some cases, the person will have to be put on a ventilator (a mechanical breathing machine).

Specific treatment will depend on the cause of the coma. For example, if the coma was caused by head trauma, efforts will be made to stop any bleeding or swelling in the brain. If the coma was caused by a metabolic imbalance, physicians will try to reverse it by treating the underlying condition. If poisoning caused the coma, physicians may give medications to counteract the depressive effects of the substance that caused the coma.

Once the person is appropriately treated for the immediate cause of coma, treatment will focus on supportive care. This usually includes making sure the person does not suffocate, making sure the person's muscles and ligaments stay flexible, providing adequate nutrition and preventing infections, such as pneumonia. Because a person in a coma cannot move on his or her own, it's important that his or her body be rotated periodically to prevent bedsores.

When To Call A Professional

Seek emergency care if a person appears to be unconscious, is unable to respond or cannot be awakened from a sleep.

Prognosis

The duration of a coma depends on the cause, extent and severity of the damage to the brain. Some people make a full recovery, others recover with some residual physical or intellectual effects, and others die of their injuries or condition. It is not always possible to predict who will recover and who will not. Recovery is more likely from a coma resulting from a metabolic disorder, such as diabetes, than from a coma resulting from trauma. People in a persistent vegetative state rarely recover. In general, the longer the coma, the more pessimistic the outlook.

People who awaken from a coma usually do so slowly, over days. Although comas rarely last longer than four weeks, some people can remain in a coma or persistent vegetative state for months or years.
"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-29 08:44:52 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

..... so now I have the proper medical term for my general condition in the morning before I\'ve had my first cup of tea..... ;-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-29 08:50:47 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Can also be called \"apallic state\" - see Edith\'s suggestion below.

\"Vegetative state



A state of permanent coma.

Referred to as the \"apallic syndrome\" in the German literature.

diffuse brain injury
Glascow Outcome Score
permanent
persistent\"

http://uscneurosurgery.com/glossary/v/vegetative state.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-29 08:51:38 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

em, I meant \"apallic syndrome\".... must go and get some more tea....


    Reference: http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSHPO000/25792/29843.ht...
Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 12:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 3409
Grading comment
Thank you very much Allison and Edith. In the end I decided to go with Allison's "persistive vegitative state" as the exhibition was geared to the general public which might not understand the correct medial term as suggested by Edith, appalic patient. As both are entirely correct, however, I will enter both in the glossary. Thanks guys!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  EdithK: Hi, my answer "apallic syndrome" came 6 minutes earlier though your explanation is better.
10 mins
  -> Hello! So I guess it's a tie.....

agree  jerrie: (persistent) vegetative state : http://books.cambridge.org/0521441587.htm
14 mins

agree  Tey Lyn
40 mins

agree  Martina Keskintepe: Great explanation!
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
apallic patient


Explanation:
.

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Note added at 2003-01-29 08:47:36 (GMT)
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Zur Erklärung

www.wachkoma.at/Informationen.Remissionsphasen.htm

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Note added at 2003-01-29 08:55:59 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Well, you asked for *patient*

EdithK
Switzerland
Local time: 12:09
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 9188

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Steffen Walter: Moin, Edith ;-) Nimble fingers again?
48 mins
  -> Thanks, not really. See what Alison produced and that ahead of me.

agree  Translations4IT: http://www.ub.es/congres/mmn2000/Abstracts/Lang.htm
52 mins
  -> Danke, Sabine.
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