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interessant (here)

English translation: (high) quality patients; lucrative patients

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:interessante Patienten
English translation:(high) quality patients; lucrative patients
Entered by: Rowan Morrell
Options:
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02:26 Dec 3, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
Marketing / Laser Use in Dentistry
German term or phrase: interessant (here)
"Auf diese Weise können auch neue interessante Patienten gewonnen und an die Praxis gebunden werden."

Talking about the advantages of using laser in dentistry. One of the advantages is that it's good for a dental practice's images, which leads to the "neue interessante" patients being gained.

I don't like "interesting" one bit here. Surely it's irrelevant whether a patient is "interesting" or "boring"! I did see "finanziell interessant" translated as "financially rewarding" in Leo, and wonder if that is maybe the intended meaning in my particular context. TIA for your help.
Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 16:44
prime; [top] quality
Explanation:
I guess it basically comes down to financially rewarding. In German (as in English), "interessant" is used whenever you don't want to call a spade a spade. So rather than saying "attracting long-term patients that are financially rewarding and will fill the dental practice's coffers", you say "interessant".

Keep in mind that the patient group they are targeting are in all likelihood patients that are "privat versichert", i.e. patients that pay their own bills and then claim a refund from their private health insurance, kind of "first class" patients as opposed to the standard pflichtversicherter patient whose health insurance would probably not cover all the nifty cosmetic dentistry achievable with lasers (e.g. tooth bleaching).

So, I reckon s.th. along the lines of "prime", "top quality" or just "quality" patients (patients having the means to pay for laser dentistry) would do the job.
Selected response from:

Beate Lutzebaeck
New Zealand
Local time: 16:44
Grading comment
Thank you for such a comprehensive and convincing answer, Beate. It helped a lot. "Quality patients" got quite a number of search engine hits in a dental marketing context too, so that clinched it for me. I also like "lucrative patients" a lot too, and will enter this in the glossary as well. Thanks again for your help - much appreciated. Thanks also to the others who offered an idea.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3prime; [top] qualityBeate Lutzebaeck
5interesting cases
Harald Moelzer (medical-translator)
4 +1interesting
Trudy Peters
4lucrative
Mario Marcolin
4new patients with purchasing power
Robert Schlarb
4new patientsLaurel Porter


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
new patients


Explanation:
(amentiferous? amentaceous?)

I believe the "interessante" portion of this sentence should be judiciously omitted. All new patients are by definition good for the practice's finances (assuming their insurance pays up), and as you point out, whether they're tedious or fascinating doesn't enter into the question.

Laurel Porter
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 44
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
prime; [top] quality


Explanation:
I guess it basically comes down to financially rewarding. In German (as in English), "interessant" is used whenever you don't want to call a spade a spade. So rather than saying "attracting long-term patients that are financially rewarding and will fill the dental practice's coffers", you say "interessant".

Keep in mind that the patient group they are targeting are in all likelihood patients that are "privat versichert", i.e. patients that pay their own bills and then claim a refund from their private health insurance, kind of "first class" patients as opposed to the standard pflichtversicherter patient whose health insurance would probably not cover all the nifty cosmetic dentistry achievable with lasers (e.g. tooth bleaching).

So, I reckon s.th. along the lines of "prime", "top quality" or just "quality" patients (patients having the means to pay for laser dentistry) would do the job.

Beate Lutzebaeck
New Zealand
Local time: 16:44
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2079
Grading comment
Thank you for such a comprehensive and convincing answer, Beate. It helped a lot. "Quality patients" got quite a number of search engine hits in a dental marketing context too, so that clinched it for me. I also like "lucrative patients" a lot too, and will enter this in the glossary as well. Thanks again for your help - much appreciated. Thanks also to the others who offered an idea.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Olaf Reibedanz: Good thinking!
29 mins
  -> Ta ... ;-)

agree  swisstell: yes, potentially "loaded" clients/patients
3 hrs

agree  Lori Dendy-Molz: I like "prime".
4 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
interesting


Explanation:
I see nothing wrong with interesting. They're not talking about the patients' personalities, but about the fact that they're interesting from a professional point of view.

Trudy Peters
United States
Local time: 22:44
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 3087
Grading comment
Whichever way they're "interesting", "interesting" simply doesn't work in this context! Sorry, but this is a non-starter.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  shabda
5 hrs
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The asker has declined this answer
Comment: Whichever way they're "interesting", "interesting" simply doesn't work in this context! Sorry, but this is a non-starter.

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
interesting cases


Explanation:
you are absolutely right, Rowan - it's not a question of interesting or boring patients but interesting (new types of, challenging, financially rewarding) cases!!!
It's not just a cliché, that physicians do not think of patients, but of cases (anamnesis, symptoms, diagnosis, therapy, follow-up etc)!

You can find this term on US as well as on UK web sites (>5.500 Googles).



    Reference: http:///www.nottingham.ac.uk/radiology/pdq/othercases.htm
    www.usc.edu/schools/medicine/departments/emergency_medicine/ international/Pages/interesting_cases.html
Harald Moelzer (medical-translator)
Germany
Local time: 04:44
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 2466
Grading comment
Sorry, Harald, but I don't agree with your "cases" interpretation. The sentence I've cited is talking about winning new patients, of the "interessant" variety, which, as others have indicated, does indeed seem to mean well-off and therefore potentially more rewarding financially. Anyway, cases would be "Fälle" or something along those lines.
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The asker has declined this answer
Comment: Sorry, Harald, but I don't agree with your "cases" interpretation. The sentence I've cited is talking about winning new patients, of the "interessant" variety, which, as others have indicated, does indeed seem to mean well-off and therefore potentially more rewarding financially. Anyway, cases would be "Fälle" or something along those lines.

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
new patients with purchasing power


Explanation:
While agreeing with the above that "interessant" = "financially interesting", you yourself probably don't think of a cash cow when you read "interesting" (i.e. the opposite of boring).

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Note added at 2003-12-03 06:59:29 (GMT)
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Perhaps: \"lucrative\" (although: is this calling a spade a spade? Depends on the sensitiveness of your target readers -- German speakers are much more sensitive to talking about incomes than, say, Americans).

Robert Schlarb
Local time: 04:44
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 1034
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
lucrative


Explanation:
lucrative patients, i.e patients prepared to spend what it takes..

"These new hospitals present a threat to general hospitals, because they draw away relatively lucrative patients"
www.digitaldfw.com/clients/bizpress/ v1/story.asp?i=67&s=1773

Mario Marcolin
Sweden
Local time: 04:44
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 198
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