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einklinken - Einklinker - Störer - Igeltext

English translation: baseline/tagline

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11:50 Aug 6, 2000
German to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Advertising / Public Relations
German term or phrase: einklinken - Einklinker - Störer - Igeltext
einklinken - Einklinker - Störer - Igeltext

This has nothing to do with a catches or bolts or demonstrators or books for hedgehogs. They are advertising words, usually used together with English words like copy, headline, subhead, body etc to show what goes where on a advertisement. The usage of these words began with printed advertising but I think they are also now used for electronic media too. We tried to find "Igeltext" and "Störer" back in May when an unnamed expert came up with "teaser" for Störer. I thought that sounded good, awarded the points, satisfied the customer, got my money and even got more business from the company. It seemed OK because the "Störer" is a short, snappy line of text to catch the reader's eye and make her/him want to read or listen further. Unfortunately, I found this web site later:

http://www.smartbiz.com/sbs/arts/ams2.htm

which makes me think "teaser" may be wrong. So now, I am back to square one. "Igeltext" was a list of country names just under the body text, probably meant to show where the ad would be run. The mysterious expert suggested that maybe "Igeltext" was something nobody should touch. That may be right, it may be called that to inform the printer that it is for info only and he should not print it, literally not touch it. At any rate I still have no English translations for either term.

Einklinker and einklinken are quite logical. An Einklinker is a relatively small section of text or an image or both together that can be put in the ad and taken out again simply and easily to make small locality or time/date changes. For example, one ad could be designed for a product, run in Germany and Austria using an "Einklinker" to give the prices in the appropriate currencies for the location.

Thanks in advance, Dan
Dan McCrosky
Local time: 11:25
English translation:baseline/tagline
Explanation:
Just spoke to a friend who works in an ad agency and described your words to him. He thought Stoerer was definitely baseline or tagline. He wasn't sure what they called Igeltext, although he understood what it was. He suggested you just call it printing info. If you can wait till tomorrow he'll check on Einklinker. Again he knew what it was but couldn't come up with it's technically term called. He said they usually leave these parts of the text in black positive since that makes it easier to change that part during printing.
HTH
Selected response from:

Anya Malhotra
Local time: 15:55
Grading comment
I said I was not going to award any points till I was 100%satisfied. I am still not 100% satisfied but you all have outwaited me and Henry is nörgeling that I grade the answers. Thanks to everyone for trying to help, it might well be that these werbefuzzies are just throwing these terms around loosely without really thinking about what they mean. Dan
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
namore on tag lineBeth Kantus
nabaseline/taglineAnya Malhotra
naBeen there, done that, got the battle scars!Dan McCrosky
nawrong movieBeth Kantus
natag lineBeth Kantus
naEinklinker = insetUlrike Lieder


  

Answers


37 mins
Einklinker = inset


Explanation:
A picture is worth a 1,000 words - see the URL below for an illustration of an Einklinker. That's what newspapers and magazines here call an inset. Seems to fits your description to a T.
The verb form would be tough - set in ? insert an inset ? place an inset ?

Am still mulling over your Störer and Igeltext. I'm thinking along the lines of grabber or hook for Störer, but haven't really found anything to support my theories. But maybe that'll give you another perspective.



    Reference: http://www.hansel-moebel.de/bietet_was/Gartenabteilung/Flach...
Ulrike Lieder
Local time: 02:25
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: German
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7 hrs
tag line


Explanation:
For Störer, I believe tag line is what you're looking for. It's a one-liner or short phrase to catch attention, sort of the ad campaign's "calling card," such as Diet Coke's "Just for the Taste of It," and Coke's "The Real Thing" There's a 1985 comedy called Lost in America which stars Albert Brooks as an ad exec. Not to get into the details of the story, but at the end he interviews for a spot as creative director at an advertising agency in NYC and during the course of the interview delivers their "tag line" for a new ad campaign. Maybe this will work for you until some industry insider can provide the latest jargony term, if there is one. HTH, Beth.

Beth Kantus
United States
Local time: 05:25
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
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12 hrs
wrong movie


Explanation:
It must be the late hour. I can't believe I mixed up my movies. The film with the term tag line in it is much newer. As a matter of fact, it's the recent remake of the Out-of-Towners starring Steve Martin and Goldie Hawn. So the use of tag line is much more recent than I had remembered!
For Einklinker I like inset too. Couldn't you say something like "put the price inset for Germany in?" Igeltext is harder - since I'm mixing up movies already, that one had better wait!
Happy Hunting, Beth

Beth Kantus
United States
Local time: 05:25
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
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14 hrs
Been there, done that, got the battle scars!


Explanation:
Point one: According to my Pons Fachwörterbuch Druck- und Verlagswesen, an "inset" is a "Nebenbild" and according to Ernst, an "inset plate" is an "Einschaltbild". They both sound too graphic for my translation, in which the "Einklinker" in this case is really only two lines of text. I will give you as much of the actual text as I can:

"Win a trip to XXXX: Insgesamt YYY Teilnehmer am MMM NNN OOO PPP Gewinnspiel werden nach XXXX fliegen. Die Gewinner sind bereits benachrichtigt."

Point two: Concerning "Störer" - "Tagline", according to my little brother (51) who has only been a copywriter for 30 years and an ad agency owner for 15 years, as well as these sites:

http://www.3com.com/legal/trademark/pusage_logo/tagline.html -

http://www.aquentmagazine.com/c/co/gw/lf/linda015.html -

is often a short line at the end or bottom of an ad or spot (or somewhere near the logo, wherever the logo may be located) meant to leave a lasting impression with the listener/viewer/reader. The "tagline" may also sometimes be what the Germans refer to as an "Abbinder". It is used in this sense in web site construction, usually shortened to "tag". I have tried to ask my brother again specifically about "Störer" but he is in the Caribbean somewhere out of email contact.

NODE says that a tag line is "a catchphrase or slogan, especially as used in advertising, or the punchline of a joke." This seems to back up my brother and the two sites above. By the way, here are some funny taglines. I just haven't figured out where they go on the page and whether they are "Störer" or "Abbinder"! I am beginning to get the feeling that there may be two (or more) meanings for "tagline".

http://www.geocities.com/SouthBeach/1915/tagline.html -

What I am looking is at the other end, the beginning or top, the "attention getter". It may be when all this is over that "attention getter" is the best we can do with "Störer".

Any further suggestions will be highly appreciated. I'm not giving away any points till I'm 100% satisfied.

- TIA - Dan

Dan McCrosky
Local time: 11:25
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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20 hrs
more on tag line


Explanation:
The tag line used in the movie was "Only in New York..." and was designed as a lead-in phrase at the beginning of the ad to catch people's attention and make them want to listen to or read the rest of the ad. Based on the search results I got for it, it also seems to be used as the lead-in phrase for ads for new movies, such as "Just when you thought it was safe to go swimming again..." for the latest killer shark movie. But I guess we can't use Hollywood as an expert source.
Think your client would spring for you to consult with your industry insider on location?!
By the way, I thought hook was not a bad suggestion. The connotations are not entirely positive, but it is a functional description, no?


Beth Kantus
United States
Local time: 05:25
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
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22 hrs
baseline/tagline


Explanation:
Just spoke to a friend who works in an ad agency and described your words to him. He thought Stoerer was definitely baseline or tagline. He wasn't sure what they called Igeltext, although he understood what it was. He suggested you just call it printing info. If you can wait till tomorrow he'll check on Einklinker. Again he knew what it was but couldn't come up with it's technically term called. He said they usually leave these parts of the text in black positive since that makes it easier to change that part during printing.
HTH

Anya Malhotra
Local time: 15:55
PRO pts in category: 2
Grading comment
I said I was not going to award any points till I was 100%satisfied. I am still not 100% satisfied but you all have outwaited me and Henry is nörgeling that I grade the answers. Thanks to everyone for trying to help, it might well be that these werbefuzzies are just throwing these terms around loosely without really thinking about what they mean. Dan
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Changes made by editors
Sep 12, 2008 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
Field (specific)(none) » Advertising / Public Relations


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