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Einzelradaufhängung / Antrieb

English translation: independent suspension

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Einzelradaufhängung / Antrieb
English translation:independent suspension
Entered by: David Williams
Options:
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06:54 Sep 29, 2011
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Mechanics / Mech Engineering
German term or phrase: Einzelradaufhängung / Antrieb
Context:

"Einzelradaufhängung / Antrieb
Der Antrieb soll über eine Einzelradaufhängung geschehen."

Cf.: http://www.proz.com/kudoz/4533556
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/4534045
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/4534111

I would have thought that Einzelradaufhängung would simply be "independent suspension" or "independent wheel suspension", but in that case, I really don't understand this. Can drive be delivered to the wheels via the suspension?

* Sentence or paragraph where the term occurs: See above
* Document type: Performance specifications
* Target audience: Mechanical engineers
* Country and dialect (source): German
* Country and dialect (target): American English

Note: Although ProZ recommends that I wait 24 hours before selecting a best answer, to allow pros from around the world to research and answer, my deadline is today, so an answer within 24 hours would be very much appreciated.
David Williams
Germany
Local time: 11:18
independent suspension
Explanation:
@David, technically there really is no other type than independent suspension if Einzelradaufhängung is the term. So there you're 100% safe.
A car can typically have independent suspension in the front, and a rear axle (e.g. a deDion axle) where the wheels are linked and in fixated position. Drive can be supplied over both front and rear suspension, but in this example drive tot the front train is most common.
What is meant here, is that the power supply/drive to the wheels should go via the independent suspension, so in this case over the front suspension, but nevertheless using drive shafts etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 uren (2011-09-29 15:04:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

@David: Good question, that's where the confusion comes from. The suspension itself must (amongst other important tasks that it fulfils) hold the wheel in it's place, can by no means transfer engine power to the wheel. It is supposed to stay steady (while allowing the wheel to move up and down and turn around and turn left&right for steering purposes if it's the front axle), so it can by no means transfer drive power to that same wheel itself. The drive shaft goes from the gearbox (or differential or whatever part of the power train) through the suspension geometry to the wheel to make it turn.
Here's a rear wheel drive axle system:
http://www.lexam.net/peter/carnut/320-rear-suspension-drawin...
I hope that it completes the picture.
Selected response from:

Willem Wunderink
Netherlands
Local time: 11:18
Grading comment
Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1independent suspension
Willem Wunderink


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


37 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
independent suspension


Explanation:
@David, technically there really is no other type than independent suspension if Einzelradaufhängung is the term. So there you're 100% safe.
A car can typically have independent suspension in the front, and a rear axle (e.g. a deDion axle) where the wheels are linked and in fixated position. Drive can be supplied over both front and rear suspension, but in this example drive tot the front train is most common.
What is meant here, is that the power supply/drive to the wheels should go via the independent suspension, so in this case over the front suspension, but nevertheless using drive shafts etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 uren (2011-09-29 15:04:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

@David: Good question, that's where the confusion comes from. The suspension itself must (amongst other important tasks that it fulfils) hold the wheel in it's place, can by no means transfer engine power to the wheel. It is supposed to stay steady (while allowing the wheel to move up and down and turn around and turn left&right for steering purposes if it's the front axle), so it can by no means transfer drive power to that same wheel itself. The drive shaft goes from the gearbox (or differential or whatever part of the power train) through the suspension geometry to the wheel to make it turn.
Here's a rear wheel drive axle system:
http://www.lexam.net/peter/carnut/320-rear-suspension-drawin...
I hope that it completes the picture.

Example sentence(s):
  • The drive should be supplied over an independent suspension.
Willem Wunderink
Netherlands
Local time: 11:18
Specializes in field
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks!
Notes to answerer
Asker: OK, I think I see, but is suspension used as a drive shaft or transmission in some way?


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Johannes Gleim: excactly!
2 mins
  -> Danke schön, Johannes!
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