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n.n.

English translation: unknown ("nomen nescio")

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08:29 Nov 12, 2001
German to English translations [PRO]
Medical
German term or phrase: n.n.
Im "Analysenbogen" einer Gabapentinmischung steht:


Analyse: Zersetzung DC prüfung
Gö 3450-Lactam
n.n.

Weitere Zusatzspots
n.n.
David Rumsey
Canada
Local time: 22:21
English translation:unknown ("nomen nescio")
Explanation:
If my conjecture is correct, David, then he probably hit upon a substance or two that he couldn't readily analize, so he reported "n.n.", which stands for nomen nescio = I don't know the name. Maybe you can deduct from the context of the document whether or not my assumption is right.

Good luck!
Selected response from:

LegalTrans D
Turkey
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4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4normal null OR none notedNancy Schmeing
4just a couple of suggestionsBeth Kantus
4unknown ("nomen nescio")
LegalTrans D


  

Answers


18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
unknown ("nomen nescio")


Explanation:
If my conjecture is correct, David, then he probably hit upon a substance or two that he couldn't readily analize, so he reported "n.n.", which stands for nomen nescio = I don't know the name. Maybe you can deduct from the context of the document whether or not my assumption is right.

Good luck!


    Latin
LegalTrans D
Turkey
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 551
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
just a couple of suggestions


Explanation:
Often N.N. is used (Latin for Nomen Nominandum) to mean not yet named.
You could use "not yet named" or "to be designated." Or you could stick with the Latin and use N.N.; however, if your audience tends more toward the American English variety, TBA (to be announced) is more common in many other contexts and would probably be better understood.

I have also heard that n.n. stands for noch nicht, and since in your text the two n's are lower case, this might be what the abbreviation is meant to stand for, i.e. if the tests have not yet been done.

NOTE: these are just guesses - you really need more context to know for sure.

Beth Kantus
United States
Local time: 01:21
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 924
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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
normal null OR none noted


Explanation:
nn from context obviously means there isn't any.

Ernst gives normal Null. This is sometimes used to indicate standard conditions like sea level. I do not know whether this applies here. But it might, since it is consistent with the meaning.

I would check via a search whether it means "none noted", as in there is none of either of the 2 mentioned conditions. That is obviously the meaning.


    Ernst, dictionary of engineering and technology
Nancy Schmeing
Canada
Local time: 01:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 328
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