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homogene Signalarmut

English translation: homogeneously low signal

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03:38 Sep 4, 2001
German to English translations [PRO]
Medical
German term or phrase: homogene Signalarmut
Kernspintomografie des Knies: Glatte Konturen und homogene Signalarmut des Außenmeniskus.
Birgit Wahl
Germany
Local time: 21:55
English translation:homogeneously low signal
Explanation:
homogeneously low signal

>>Smooth contours and homogeneously low signal of the lateral meniscus.<<

Usage notes: HOMOGENOUS AND HOMOGENEOUS

These words are so similar in spelling that they have become confused in English and the first is now frequently used in places where until recently only the second was permitted. However, they have very different senses and pronunciations.

The first is comparatively modern (it is first attested from 1870) and has the specific meaning in biology of organisms that are similar because they have common ancestors; the word is made up of the Greek words homo-, 'the same', and genos, 'race; stock; kind' (from which we ultimately also derive genus and genetic). It is pronounced with the stress on the second syllable. However, it is not now much used (the Ninth Edition of the Concise Oxford Dictionary marks it as 'archaic') and it is often replaced by homogenetic.

The other word, homogeneous, is much older and describes things which are of uniform constitution throughout or which are all of the same type or kind; for example, a material may be said to be homogeneous if any bit of it is indistinguishable from any other. It is usually pronounced with the stress on the third syllable.

Part of the confusion between the two words has arisen because the one with the extra 'e' has frequently come to be pronounced in the same way as the other, perhaps under the influence of homogenise (and the very common adjective homogenised, in reference to milk which has been brought to a common consistency throughout by emulsifying the fat droplets so the cream doesn't separate out), both of which are stressed on the second syllable.

In American usage, the forms still seem to be distinguished for the most part, but in British English both spellings are now used with small and decreasing discrimination when homogeneous is meant. The advice of most style guides and dictionaries, however, is to retain the distinction, both in spelling and in pronunciation.

http://www.quinion.com/words/usagenotes/un-homo.htm


HTH Tom
Selected response from:

Tom Funke
Local time: 15:55
Grading comment
thanks again.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +1homogeneously low signal
Tom Funke
na +1homogenous low signalKlaus Dorn


  

Answers


8 mins peer agreement (net): +1
homogenous low signal


Explanation:
source:

Increased T2 signal inside the jointspace and along the left dorsal internal meniscal sheeth. The congruent cartilage of te left internal Tibia and Femur shows a rippled surface in EFSPGR slices. There is also rippled surface of the cartilage on the backside of the Patella detectable. Normal signal and position of the left anterior and posterior cruciate ligament in all measurements. Areas of low signal (T1) in the bone are detectable underneath the cartilage of the Femurcondyles


    Reference: http://www.tigress.com/cougar/mri.html
Klaus Dorn
Local time: 23:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 1514

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxHenri
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
homogeneously low signal


Explanation:
homogeneously low signal

>>Smooth contours and homogeneously low signal of the lateral meniscus.<<

Usage notes: HOMOGENOUS AND HOMOGENEOUS

These words are so similar in spelling that they have become confused in English and the first is now frequently used in places where until recently only the second was permitted. However, they have very different senses and pronunciations.

The first is comparatively modern (it is first attested from 1870) and has the specific meaning in biology of organisms that are similar because they have common ancestors; the word is made up of the Greek words homo-, 'the same', and genos, 'race; stock; kind' (from which we ultimately also derive genus and genetic). It is pronounced with the stress on the second syllable. However, it is not now much used (the Ninth Edition of the Concise Oxford Dictionary marks it as 'archaic') and it is often replaced by homogenetic.

The other word, homogeneous, is much older and describes things which are of uniform constitution throughout or which are all of the same type or kind; for example, a material may be said to be homogeneous if any bit of it is indistinguishable from any other. It is usually pronounced with the stress on the third syllable.

Part of the confusion between the two words has arisen because the one with the extra 'e' has frequently come to be pronounced in the same way as the other, perhaps under the influence of homogenise (and the very common adjective homogenised, in reference to milk which has been brought to a common consistency throughout by emulsifying the fat droplets so the cream doesn't separate out), both of which are stressed on the second syllable.

In American usage, the forms still seem to be distinguished for the most part, but in British English both spellings are now used with small and decreasing discrimination when homogeneous is meant. The advice of most style guides and dictionaries, however, is to retain the distinction, both in spelling and in pronunciation.

http://www.quinion.com/words/usagenotes/un-homo.htm


HTH Tom



    Reference: http://www.quinion.com/words/usagenotes/un-homo.htm
Tom Funke
Local time: 15:55
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 2419
Grading comment
thanks again.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Trudy Peters
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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