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\"Glück auf Ihr Leut\"

English translation: (Luck of the lode to you) Do not simply translate

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Glück auf Ihr Leut
English translation:(Luck of the lode to you) Do not simply translate
Entered by: Jan Schauseil
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06:34 Dec 3, 2016
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Mining & Minerals / Gems
German term or phrase: \"Glück auf Ihr Leut\"
Heading for a text about a historic silver mine. Some kind of proverb used by miners in the past.
Jan Schauseil
Thailand
Local time: 05:42
(Luck of the lode to you) Do not simply translate
Explanation:
Nowadays, it is not recommended to simply translate such things, but to add the translation in parentheses behind the saying. At least, this is how I would do it.
Selected response from:

Ramey Rieger
Germany
Local time: 00:42
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +3(Luck of the lode to you) Do not simply translate
Ramey Rieger
3 +1Tap ‘er light
Michael Martin, MA
3"Glückauf" untranslated with explanation in brackets; something like "Be your shift a lucky one " !
Ellen Kraus


Discussion entries: 8





  

Answers


41 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Tap ‘er light


Explanation:
This will only work in a North American or US context. I imagine in the UK there might be something about "going down the pit"..

"Tap ‘er light. This old saying, unfamiliar to most, finds its origin in western Montana from “Cousin Jacks,” the miners who emigrated from CornwallEngland. In order to hand drill the rock for dynamite, one man would hold the drill rod (about 1¼ inch diameter), and a second man would hit it with a double jack (a sledgehammer). Apprehensive about getting his hand whacked, the first would say “tap ‘er light.” “Tap” was a misnomer since the sledge was coming full circle and would smack the rod with nothing less than a wholehearted swing! The holder would twist the rod about ¼ of a turn, and at that instant the big hammer would strike again, creating a rhythmic cadence. Do you remember “John Henry, the steel driving man?” That’s the idea.
After drilling, the warning was again appropriate as they would cautiously pack the dynamite . . . and carefully tap it all the way to the bottom of the hole! The comment later evolved into a greeting when they passed each other to and from the mine; “Tap ‘er light” was an encouraging way of saying “Have a good shift." http://www.cbmoffice.org/precioustruths/tap-er-light/

Michael Martin, MA
United States
Local time: 18:42
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ventnai: Or something similar. Not sure if leaving it untranslated is a good idea at all. Debatable whether this is common practice.
5 hrs
  -> I do prefer your approach. But unfortunately, the expression I picked may not be general enough as it points to regional practices that probably differed from those used in German silver mines (using dynamite instead of gunpowder for rock blasting)
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
(Luck of the lode to you) Do not simply translate


Explanation:
Nowadays, it is not recommended to simply translate such things, but to add the translation in parentheses behind the saying. At least, this is how I would do it.

Ramey Rieger
Germany
Local time: 00:42
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  t_pataki: I guess so too, this was the most common greeting in the 18th/19th century in the Schemnitz/Freiberg regions, "Good luck men!"
1 hr
  -> Weidmans Heil!

agree  EdithK: The STC Swiss Tunnel Congress says in English simply "Good luck"
2 hrs
  -> Yes, but the poesy is lost, isn't it?

agree  Irene3: "may lodes [of ore] be opened" Glück auf From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
4 hrs
  -> Saw that, too, Irene.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
"Glückauf" untranslated with explanation in brackets; something like "Be your shift a lucky one " !


Explanation:
I would suggest, one might perhaps add "miner" (for Kumpel)

Ellen Kraus
Austria
Local time: 00:42
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
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