KudoZ home » German to English » Music

Ton anschleifen

English translation: slide up

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Ton anschleifen
English translation:slide up
Entered by: Antje Ruppert
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

17:00 May 15, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Music / Music
German term or phrase: Ton anschleifen
Is the explanation for the following accent/phrasing mark: > and supposedly has nothing to do with volume but relates to starting at a lower note and rising in pitch. Unfortunately there is no more context. I always assumed that this mark signified the crescendo but my client says that this is wrong...

All help is greatly appreciated.

Antje
Antje Ruppert
United States
Local time: 16:19
slide up to a note
Explanation:
First, let´s translate the words, and come to the > sign afterwards.

Quantz and Bach used the term Schleifer for an ornament (represented by a sign I can´t indicate with this keyboard) which consisted of sliding up to a note.

Cécile understands "Ton anschleifen" immediately, and as we discuss (in German) makes it clear that her understanding is of sliding up. Not down. When I ask about down, she mentions glissando, which can be in either direction. But anschleifen is slide upwards.

The Bach and Quantz Schleifer was also up only (almost always). It is described by both of them as consisting of two or more Vorschlag notes (but on the beat please!). But they were both talking about instruments which can´t slide as a violin can.

If it was a guitar, you might prefer "bending", we guitarists :-) think of it like that because we bend the string. Except when we are using a slide, and then I would say slide rather than bend.

Now to the sign. You, of course, can´t argue with the client, but I can. He is wrong. Cécile and I both know ">" as an accent mark - she with more certainty, because as flautist she has much more to do with them than I as keyboard player do. "Es ist ein Betonungszeichen", she says. We also find this in dtv-Atlas zur Musik Band 1, 1977. It gives “>” under marcato – emphasis - which is how we understand it.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-15 19:05:10 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Regarding crescendo and de-crescendo / diminuendo, they are represented either by abbreviations of the words or by signs known as hairpins. Of course we are limited by the font here, but they are almost never as short as \">\". (A hairpin of the \">\" shape is of course diminuendo.)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-15 20:26:50 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

But if it´s singing, then while \"slide\" is OK, and perhaps preferred for jazz and modern vocals, for classical singing it would usually be \"glissando\".
Selected response from:

Chris Rowson
Local time: 22:19
Grading comment
Thanks again, Chris and Cécile!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4to acuminate (the/a) tone
Matthew Rosencrance
4slide up to a noteChris Rowson
3bend pitch (upwards)ntext
2 +1bend/slide up to a note
William Stein


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
to acuminate (the/a) tone


Explanation:
I think this works

Matthew Rosencrance
United States
Local time: 16:19
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
bend pitch (upwards)


Explanation:
I would've also assumend that > means crescendo or marcato, but apparently here it doesn't.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-15 17:25:39 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Or: bend tone.

Actually, could it be that the mark should be ^ rather than >? Check out the explanations here:

http://metaltabs.com/tab/1372/

ntext
United States
Local time: 15:19
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 36

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Chris Rowson: If it´s a guitar then "bend" (except when played with a slide), but I think we say "bend a note" rather than "bend pitch". But where guitarists bend, strings and wind slide.
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
bend/slide up to a note


Explanation:
This is just a guess, but maybe it refers to reaching a note by bending the string with the left hand (a common guitar technique) or sliding up to a note (slide guitar).

William Stein
Costa Rica
Local time: 14:19
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Chris Rowson: Right. See below for more detail, and other instruments.
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
slide up to a note


Explanation:
First, let´s translate the words, and come to the > sign afterwards.

Quantz and Bach used the term Schleifer for an ornament (represented by a sign I can´t indicate with this keyboard) which consisted of sliding up to a note.

Cécile understands "Ton anschleifen" immediately, and as we discuss (in German) makes it clear that her understanding is of sliding up. Not down. When I ask about down, she mentions glissando, which can be in either direction. But anschleifen is slide upwards.

The Bach and Quantz Schleifer was also up only (almost always). It is described by both of them as consisting of two or more Vorschlag notes (but on the beat please!). But they were both talking about instruments which can´t slide as a violin can.

If it was a guitar, you might prefer "bending", we guitarists :-) think of it like that because we bend the string. Except when we are using a slide, and then I would say slide rather than bend.

Now to the sign. You, of course, can´t argue with the client, but I can. He is wrong. Cécile and I both know ">" as an accent mark - she with more certainty, because as flautist she has much more to do with them than I as keyboard player do. "Es ist ein Betonungszeichen", she says. We also find this in dtv-Atlas zur Musik Band 1, 1977. It gives “>” under marcato – emphasis - which is how we understand it.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-15 19:05:10 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Regarding crescendo and de-crescendo / diminuendo, they are represented either by abbreviations of the words or by signs known as hairpins. Of course we are limited by the font here, but they are almost never as short as \">\". (A hairpin of the \">\" shape is of course diminuendo.)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-15 20:26:50 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

But if it´s singing, then while \"slide\" is OK, and perhaps preferred for jazz and modern vocals, for classical singing it would usually be \"glissando\".


    dtv-Atlas zur Musik Band 1
    Reference: http://www.candcmusic.de
Chris Rowson
Local time: 22:19
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 26
Grading comment
Thanks again, Chris and Cécile!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search