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leben/wohnen wie Gott in Frankreich

English translation: possibly live the life of Riley ?

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08:50 Aug 23, 2000
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
German term or phrase: leben/wohnen wie Gott in Frankreich
The context concerns staying overnight at a luxurious hotel:

"Hier können Sie wohnen wie Gott in Frankreich."

I know what it means in general and my Duden Eleven made a brave attempt to explain where it comes from, but I can only think of the following translations. The direct translation sounds just as good and logical in English as it does in German, but I do not know if it is often/ever used in English. Most of the few hits I get in English are quoted German or Dutch. I am afraid not enough readers will understand it. Can I safely use it in English? We want to sell them something, not confuse them. If not what would you suggest?

"live like God in France"

"live in the lap of luxury"

"live high on the hog"

"live like a king"

"live as in paradise

TIA - Dan."
Dan McCrosky
Local time: 14:03
English translation:possibly live the life of Riley ?
Explanation:
My personal preference would be to use "live in the lap of luxury" -- it sounds SOOO much more luxurious and pampered than living like a king.

I consulted my trusty Grossen Muret-Sanders, and the first choice they give for Gott in Frankreich is the lap of luxury, followed by "in clover", "like a king", and for US English, colloquial, "the life of Riley".

I suppose it would depend on your context and your target audience if the "life of Riley" would be readily understood. It sure clicked immediately with me.

If I had to give you a safe answer, I'd suggest the lap of luxury. If I had to go with my gut instinct (Sprachgefühl), and I knew my audience would understand it, I'd use the life of Riley.
HTH! -U.
Selected response from:

Ulrike Lieder
Local time: 05:03
Grading comment
This was a flop. I didn't use any of your or my suggestions. Was afraid to use "Riley" because the context was about a place where "Riley" might not be so well accepted, but uel couldn't know that. uel provided the most new idas that were not on my list (2). Thanks for trying though everyone, guess we just don't have anything as good as God in France. - Dan
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naLive in the lap of luxuryAgius Language & Translation
na"live in the lap of luxury"tuanis
napossibly live the life of Riley ?Ulrike Lieder
nalive like a king
Dierk Seeburg


  

Answers


39 mins
live like a king


Explanation:
Since the text is directed at a general audience I suggest 'live like a king'. Personally, I have never heard 'live like God in France' used anywhere here in the US. Can anyone confirm that or the opposite? I prefer 'live like a king' because it is somewhat similar to the German expression in that it implies living like another 'person'/someone else in luxury. The other expressions only allude to places and such.

Cheerio,
Dierk

Dierk Seeburg
Local time: 06:03
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 404
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57 mins
possibly live the life of Riley ?


Explanation:
My personal preference would be to use "live in the lap of luxury" -- it sounds SOOO much more luxurious and pampered than living like a king.

I consulted my trusty Grossen Muret-Sanders, and the first choice they give for Gott in Frankreich is the lap of luxury, followed by "in clover", "like a king", and for US English, colloquial, "the life of Riley".

I suppose it would depend on your context and your target audience if the "life of Riley" would be readily understood. It sure clicked immediately with me.

If I had to give you a safe answer, I'd suggest the lap of luxury. If I had to go with my gut instinct (Sprachgefühl), and I knew my audience would understand it, I'd use the life of Riley.
HTH! -U.

Ulrike Lieder
Local time: 05:03
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 3525
Grading comment
This was a flop. I didn't use any of your or my suggestions. Was afraid to use "Riley" because the context was about a place where "Riley" might not be so well accepted, but uel couldn't know that. uel provided the most new idas that were not on my list (2). Thanks for trying though everyone, guess we just don't have anything as good as God in France. - Dan
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1 hr
"live in the lap of luxury"


Explanation:
One of the most if not the most common use of "live in the lap of luxury" I found on my browser is in describing luxurious accommodation be it in hotels, cruise ships, or automobile interiors. Perhaps your best bet, since neither God nor France, although well known, are deeply understood in the U.S.



    Reference: http://www.google.com/search?q=lap+of+luxury&hl=en&safe=off&...
tuanis
Local time: 08:03
PRO pts in pair: 4
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1 hr
Live in the lap of luxury


Explanation:
I agree with the above answer. This is also widely used in the UK. What a nice turn of phrase!
Claire

Agius Language & Translation
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 132
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