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Hornkäfer

English translation: horn bug

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Hornkäfer
English translation:horn bug
Entered by: Verena Moser
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08:16 Nov 20, 2001
German to English translations [PRO]
German term or phrase: Hornkäfer
Sorry, no context available!
Verena Moser
Local time: 19:48
lucanus capreolus or lucanus dama -horn bug
Explanation:
This is what you are probably looking for. Click on the link below to see a picture.

The family LUCANIDÆ, or Lucanians, so named from the Linnæan genus LUCANUS, must be placed next to the Scarabæians in a natural arrangement. This family includes the insects called stag-beetles, horn-bugs, and flying-bulls, names that they have obtained from the great size and peculiar form of their upper jaws, which are sometimes curved like the horns of cattle, and sometimes branched like the antlers of a stag. In these beetles the body is hard, oblong, rounded behind, and slightly convex; the head is large and broad, especially in the males ; the thorax is short, and as wide as the abdomen; the antennæ are rather long, elbowed or bent in the middle, and composed of ten joints, the last three or four of which are broad, leaf-like, and project on the inside, giving to this part of the antennæ a resemblance to the end of a key; the upper jaws are usually much longer in the males than in the females, but even those of the latter extend considerably beyond the mouth; each of the under jaws is provided with a long hairy pencil or brush, which can be seen projecting beyond the mouth between the feelers; and the under lip has two shorter pencils of the same kind; the fore legs are oftentimes longer than the others, with the outer edge of the shanks notched into teeth; the feet are five-jointed, and the nails are entire and equal. These beetles fly abroad during the night, and frequently enter houses at that time, somewhat to the alarm of the occupants; but they are not venomous, and never attempt to bite without provocation. They pass the day on the trunks of trees, and live upon the sap, for procuring which the brushes of their jaws and lip seem to be designed. They are said also occasionally to bite and seize caterpillars and other soft-bodied insects, for the purpose of sucking out their juices. They lay their eggs in crevices of the bark of trees, especially near the roots, where they may sometimes be seen thus employed. The larvæ hatched from these eggs resemble the grubs of the Scarabæians in color and form, but they are smoother, or not so much wrinkled. The grubs of the large kinds are said to be six years in coming to their growth, living all this time in the trunks and roots of trees, boring into the solid wood, and reducing it to a substance resembling very coarse sawdust; and the injury thus caused by them is frequently very considerable. When they have arrived at their fall size, they enclose themselves in egg-shaped pods, composed of gnawed particles of wood and bark stuck together and lined with a kind of glue; within these pods they are transformed to pupæ, of a yellowish-white color, having the body and all the limbs of the future beetle encased in a whitish film, which being thrown off in due time, the insects appear in the beetle form, burst the walls of their prison, crawl through the passages the larvæ had gnawed, and come forth on the outside of the trees.

The largest of these beetles in the New England States was first described by Linnæus, under the name of Lucanus Capreolus* (Fig. 20), signifying the young roebuck ; but here it is called the hom-bug. Its color is a deep mahogany-brown; the surface is smooth and polished ; the upper jaws of the male are long, curved like a sickle, and furnished internally beyond the middle with a little tooth; those of the female are much shorter, and also toothed; the head of the male is broad and smooth, that of the other sex narrower and rough with punctures. The body of this beetle measures from one inch to one inch and a quarter, exclusive of the jaws. The time of its appearance is in July and the beginning of August. The grubs live in the trunks and roots of various kinds of trees, but particularly in those of old apple-trees, willows, and oaks. All the foregoing beetles have, by some naturalists, been gathered into a single tribe, called lamellicorn or leaf-horned beetles, on account of the leaf-like joints wherewith the end of their antennæ is provided.

Selected response from:

Maya Jurt
Switzerland
Local time: 20:48
Grading comment
Thank you for this very comprehensive answer!!! Verena
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2horn bug
Dr. Fred Thomson
4 +2lucanus capreolus or lucanus dama -horn bug
Maya Jurt
5 -1rhinoceros beetleIlse Flick


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
rhinoceros beetle


Explanation:
zoology knowledge

Ilse Flick
Local time: 13:48
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 55

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Uschi (Ursula) Walke: O. rhinoceros is a Nashornkäfer
5 hrs
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
horn bug


Explanation:
This is a flat beetle (not a dented VW) that has a hornlike prominence on its head. Seriously!

Dr. Fred Thomson
United States
Local time: 12:48
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 5861

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maya Jurt: Exactly,and sory: reseach took to long, did not see your answer
22 mins

agree  Johanna Timm, PhD
1 hr
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30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
lucanus capreolus or lucanus dama -horn bug


Explanation:
This is what you are probably looking for. Click on the link below to see a picture.

The family LUCANIDÆ, or Lucanians, so named from the Linnæan genus LUCANUS, must be placed next to the Scarabæians in a natural arrangement. This family includes the insects called stag-beetles, horn-bugs, and flying-bulls, names that they have obtained from the great size and peculiar form of their upper jaws, which are sometimes curved like the horns of cattle, and sometimes branched like the antlers of a stag. In these beetles the body is hard, oblong, rounded behind, and slightly convex; the head is large and broad, especially in the males ; the thorax is short, and as wide as the abdomen; the antennæ are rather long, elbowed or bent in the middle, and composed of ten joints, the last three or four of which are broad, leaf-like, and project on the inside, giving to this part of the antennæ a resemblance to the end of a key; the upper jaws are usually much longer in the males than in the females, but even those of the latter extend considerably beyond the mouth; each of the under jaws is provided with a long hairy pencil or brush, which can be seen projecting beyond the mouth between the feelers; and the under lip has two shorter pencils of the same kind; the fore legs are oftentimes longer than the others, with the outer edge of the shanks notched into teeth; the feet are five-jointed, and the nails are entire and equal. These beetles fly abroad during the night, and frequently enter houses at that time, somewhat to the alarm of the occupants; but they are not venomous, and never attempt to bite without provocation. They pass the day on the trunks of trees, and live upon the sap, for procuring which the brushes of their jaws and lip seem to be designed. They are said also occasionally to bite and seize caterpillars and other soft-bodied insects, for the purpose of sucking out their juices. They lay their eggs in crevices of the bark of trees, especially near the roots, where they may sometimes be seen thus employed. The larvæ hatched from these eggs resemble the grubs of the Scarabæians in color and form, but they are smoother, or not so much wrinkled. The grubs of the large kinds are said to be six years in coming to their growth, living all this time in the trunks and roots of trees, boring into the solid wood, and reducing it to a substance resembling very coarse sawdust; and the injury thus caused by them is frequently very considerable. When they have arrived at their fall size, they enclose themselves in egg-shaped pods, composed of gnawed particles of wood and bark stuck together and lined with a kind of glue; within these pods they are transformed to pupæ, of a yellowish-white color, having the body and all the limbs of the future beetle encased in a whitish film, which being thrown off in due time, the insects appear in the beetle form, burst the walls of their prison, crawl through the passages the larvæ had gnawed, and come forth on the outside of the trees.

The largest of these beetles in the New England States was first described by Linnæus, under the name of Lucanus Capreolus* (Fig. 20), signifying the young roebuck ; but here it is called the hom-bug. Its color is a deep mahogany-brown; the surface is smooth and polished ; the upper jaws of the male are long, curved like a sickle, and furnished internally beyond the middle with a little tooth; those of the female are much shorter, and also toothed; the head of the male is broad and smooth, that of the other sex narrower and rough with punctures. The body of this beetle measures from one inch to one inch and a quarter, exclusive of the jaws. The time of its appearance is in July and the beginning of August. The grubs live in the trunks and roots of various kinds of trees, but particularly in those of old apple-trees, willows, and oaks. All the foregoing beetles have, by some naturalists, been gathered into a single tribe, called lamellicorn or leaf-horned beetles, on account of the leaf-like joints wherewith the end of their antennæ is provided.




    Reference: http://members.aol.com/askdrjay/harris_lucanidae.htm
Maya Jurt
Switzerland
Local time: 20:48
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 545
Grading comment
Thank you for this very comprehensive answer!!! Verena

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Eva Blanar: Wow! If you are thorough!
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Eva, I am when I want to know myself, and that is most of the time :-))

agree  Uschi (Ursula) Walke: thanks for all the info. this was a lot of work !!!
5 hrs
  -> Yeah, and look at the "roi mages"
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