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Spielkultur - footballer - footy - pertaining to s

English translation: playing style / proficiency / savvy / character / literacy / mode / manner / performance / dominance

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Spielkultur (soccer)
English translation:playing style / proficiency / savvy / character / literacy / mode / manner / performance / dominance
Entered by: Dan McCrosky
Options:
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03:13 Jun 14, 2000
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
Sports / Fitness / Recreation
German term or phrase: Spielkultur - footballer - footy - pertaining to s
Enough of this boring business and medical terminology, back to something important: Fußball! First question: "Spielkultur" appears to be something a team must have to be good. I have been researching this term off and on for 24 hours now with the following results: playing style / proficiency / savvy / character / literacy / mode / manner / performance / dominance. I am not happy with any of them or I would not be bothering you. Any other ideas? Second question: Are there any negative aspects to saying "footballer" instead of "football player" or "footy" instead of "football"?
Dan McCrosky
Local time: 23:24
see below
Explanation:
There is a lot of discussion in Paul Gardners "The Simplest Game" about the caliber of play and playing style of individual players, teams, and countries. But you said you weren't happy with that term. How about game culture?>>>The term footballer sounds OK to me, but I've never heard it used. Same goes for baseballer, basketballer, etc. Maybe just player is better.>>> Footy sounds a lot like footsy (as in playing footsy under the table). Also, the term is used for those litte nylon socklets women wear inside their shoes. It may be OK if your audience is UK (which I don't know about), but probably not for the US.
HTH, Beth.
Selected response from:

Beth Kantus
United States
Local time: 17:24
Grading comment
Thank you both. Style must be right after all. Dan
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
nastyle of play
Berry Prinsen
nastyle of play
Berry Prinsen
nacorrectionBeth Kantus
nasee belowBeth Kantus


  

Answers


2 hrs
see below


Explanation:
There is a lot of discussion in Paul Gardners "The Simplest Game" about the caliber of play and playing style of individual players, teams, and countries. But you said you weren't happy with that term. How about game culture?>>>The term footballer sounds OK to me, but I've never heard it used. Same goes for baseballer, basketballer, etc. Maybe just player is better.>>> Footy sounds a lot like footsy (as in playing footsy under the table). Also, the term is used for those litte nylon socklets women wear inside their shoes. It may be OK if your audience is UK (which I don't know about), but probably not for the US.
HTH, Beth.

Beth Kantus
United States
Local time: 17:24
Native speaker of: English
Grading comment
Thank you both. Style must be right after all. Dan
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2 hrs
correction


Explanation:
I have to correct my earlier answer.
In "Soccer! The Game and the World Cup," I just read the following: "Any attempt to compare stars of the 1930s and today's top footballers is a little absurd."

Beth Kantus
United States
Local time: 17:24
Native speaker of: English
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6 hrs
style of play


Explanation:
Spielkultur is indeed best translated as 2style of play".
As far as "footy" is concerned, it is merely a colloquialism, mainly used down under but also in the UK. It means football and has nothing to do with "playing footsie" which is what one does with ones feet and those of the opposite sex beneath the table.

Berry Prinsen
Spain
Local time: 23:24
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
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6 hrs
style of play


Explanation:
Spielkultur is indeed best translated as "style of play".
As far as "footy" is concerned, it is merely a colloquialism, mainly used down under but also in the UK. It means football and has nothing to do with "playing footsie" which is what one does with ones feet and those of the opposite sex beneath the table.

Berry Prinsen
Spain
Local time: 23:24
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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