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Pfannensieb

English translation: pan sieve

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Pfannensieb
English translation:pan sieve
Entered by: Gareth McMillan
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09:37 Dec 8, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
German term or phrase: Pfannensieb
Swiss German term. There is even a picture of one on Google (Migros site) but I still can't figure out the right English term. Pan sieve in a baking context gets 1 hit. The biscuits are placed on a Pfannensieb or on a blech (baking tray).
TIA
writeaway
pan sieve, flat sieve, pan strainer (see Llinda)
Explanation:
A simple "sieve" is usually deeply concave. This is flat or shallow like a pan, and it is made of woven wire which is what sieves are made of. So, pan sieve, flat sieve, pan strainer are all fine.
This is a "people's" utensil anyway- call it anything you like if it comunicates- this is not tech/engineering.
I have seen them regularly in British fish and chip shops where they have these HUGE deep fat friers, they use them to fish out the deep fried mars bars and such English gastronomic delights. No doubt the friers have their own name for it, but I never asked.
You can also use it (as I sometimes do- see Edward) to cover a frying pan. It lets steam out and keeps spitting oil in, but this is only a secondary use.

Who cares if it only get's one Google hit? Only proves it's unusual.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 hrs 23 mins (2003-12-09 07:00:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don\'t know if it was there when I wrote this, but I\'ve just seen the last note from the asker about \"....auf ein gefettetes Pfannensieb oder -blech spritzen ...\". That now throws me completely- if you were to grease a \"sieve\" it would clog up hpelessly.

It must be what jerrie and Hermann are saying- a perforated tray or sheet of some kind.
If that\'s the case, I would say the original German is a misnomer because I can\'t see any way to conceive this as a \"Sieb\".
I\'ve changed my comments accordingly- sorry Chris!
Selected response from:

Gareth McMillan
Local time: 11:22
Grading comment
Finally had to ask the client-and it looks like it really is a pan sieve. Thank you everyone-I thought it was a perforated tray until I got the answer from client.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +4perforated baking sheet
jerrie
5 +1pan sieve, flat sieve, pan strainer (see Llinda)
Gareth McMillan
3 +3perforated tray
Hermann
5 +1strainer/lidlindaellen
4splash guardEdward Guyver
3Pan filterPedro Afonso
3colander
Textklick


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


53 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Pan filter


Explanation:
My suggestion!

Pedro Afonso
Germany
Local time: 11:22
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 12
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55 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
strainer/lid


Explanation:
I live in Switzerland and have one. It is a very practical item used to drain the water from a pan of cooked food, i.e. peas, pasta, or other vegies cooked in a liquid that is no longer needed. French is a "passoire pour casserole." It is a combination pot lid and strainer. Unfortunately I cna't think of a better Eng. term. I never saw one in the US.

lindaellen
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 206

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Trudy Peters: "pan strainer" gets quite a few hits
2 hrs

neutral  Gareth McMillan: "Lid" isn't in the question, pan strainer- is much closer.
8 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
colander


Explanation:
I couldn't find the pic at Migros, but if it looks like the one on the site below then you are home and dry ;-)


    Reference: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B000063SJ8/103...
Textklick
Local time: 10:22
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1097

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Hermann: I found the Migro product and it is not a colander
1 hr
  -> That's probably the Swiss Army version. But not something you'd put biscuits on. What about kitchen sieve - http://www.ieq-haushaltsartikel-spezialist.de/haushalt/89587...

neutral  Gareth McMillan: A colander is definitely not a sieve. It's a perforated sheet metal bowl. Sieves a from woven wire. ADD: I'd call it a gimick.
7 hrs
  -> That's what I proposed in the line above! But still check out the askers pic on http://sortimente.migros.ch/migros.cfm/s_level/11700/s_path/... and tell me what you'd call that? ;-)
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
perforated tray


Explanation:
there is one on page 3 - accessories - it is round / not like the one from Migro.

The one I have in my kitchen is a square tray with holes, the type used to bake pizzas.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 26 mins (2003-12-08 12:03:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

not suitable for trifles ;-))


    Reference: http://www.nuworld.co.uk/ib/psc002.pdf
Hermann
Local time: 10:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 1977

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Textklick: Not bad, but that seems to only chuck up industrial stuff on Google. I still reckon sieve is the safe option to lay your Browniz on..
56 mins
  -> mine are from the Jane Asher collection - ideal for pastries, cookies, etc. might well be called slotted trays

agree  Michele Johnson: I think this is a good approach. It seems to be something perforated, so practically speaking, "bake on a perforated tray or baking sheet" sounds great to me.
4 hrs

agree  Lori Dendy-Molz: Sounds reasonable.
5 hrs

agree  Gareth McMillan: Can't see a sieve on p. 3, Herman. But your perforated pizzas sound interesting. ADD: Have another look in the mornig- maybe they'll have put the right photo in by then. ADD: See added note under.
6 hrs
  -> i checked it again and it is still there - and it's a tray - clearly perforated.
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
splash guard


Explanation:
See the following website for a photo of a Pfannensieb/Spritzschutz: http://www.ieq-haushaltsartikel.de/haushalt/380731.html

I do not know if this is the same item as the one seen on the Migros site but the term "splash guard" is certainly the one that I would use for a "Pfannensieb".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-08 14:08:05 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I have just located the item on the Migros site and although the photo does not show much of a 3-D effect, I reckon that it is used for draining saucepans without losing the contents. It is not a colander but it is performing the task of a colander. It seems to be an alternative to using the saucepan lid held over the saucepan when draining boiling water from the contents.

Edward Guyver
Local time: 10:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 247

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Gareth McMillan: This is only one use for it.
4 hrs
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
perforated baking sheet


Explanation:
Does a bit better on Google...for breads/biscuits etc

Also called perforated cookie tray/sheet

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-08 20:44:46 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I guess the crux of the matter is how your Spritzkuchen are being cooked.

If it\'s a choux type pastry it can either be laid out on baking sheets/trays/pans (perforated / not-perforated / lined with baking parchment / silicon mat), and baked in the oven.

Or they can be deep-fried!
So this could be the pan-basket (basket, frying basket) that you place them in before immersing them in the oil.

hth


    Reference: http://www.cookswares.com/listbyline.asp?manuf=Vollrath&titl...
jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1469

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michele Johnson: I like the practical approach; whatever it is, it has holes and you can bake on it.
2 hrs

agree  Lori Dendy-Molz: Seems OK too.
3 hrs

agree  Laurel Porter: sounds good to me - a mad baker, I've never heard of one of these, but would know exactly what this term meant
4 hrs

agree  Gareth McMillan: Not a sieve. A sieve is a sieve and a colander is a colander and a perforated baking tray or sheet is a thingumy. (expertise- my Mum). ADD: See added note under.
4 hrs
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
pan sieve, flat sieve, pan strainer (see Llinda)


Explanation:
A simple "sieve" is usually deeply concave. This is flat or shallow like a pan, and it is made of woven wire which is what sieves are made of. So, pan sieve, flat sieve, pan strainer are all fine.
This is a "people's" utensil anyway- call it anything you like if it comunicates- this is not tech/engineering.
I have seen them regularly in British fish and chip shops where they have these HUGE deep fat friers, they use them to fish out the deep fried mars bars and such English gastronomic delights. No doubt the friers have their own name for it, but I never asked.
You can also use it (as I sometimes do- see Edward) to cover a frying pan. It lets steam out and keeps spitting oil in, but this is only a secondary use.

Who cares if it only get's one Google hit? Only proves it's unusual.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 hrs 23 mins (2003-12-09 07:00:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don\'t know if it was there when I wrote this, but I\'ve just seen the last note from the asker about \"....auf ein gefettetes Pfannensieb oder -blech spritzen ...\". That now throws me completely- if you were to grease a \"sieve\" it would clog up hpelessly.

It must be what jerrie and Hermann are saying- a perforated tray or sheet of some kind.
If that\'s the case, I would say the original German is a misnomer because I can\'t see any way to conceive this as a \"Sieb\".
I\'ve changed my comments accordingly- sorry Chris!


Gareth McMillan
Local time: 11:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 793
Grading comment
Finally had to ask the client-and it looks like it really is a pan sieve. Thank you everyone-I thought it was a perforated tray until I got the answer from client.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Textklick: Yes - I withdraw my colander and I'll buy the pan sieve
8 mins
  -> How many would you like- ? Half price to you.
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