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Samstagnachmittagkaffeeklatschkränzchen

English translation: regular get-together for coffee on a Saturday afternoon

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19:19 Dec 30, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
German term or phrase: Samstagnachmittagkaffeeklatschkränzchen
Samstagnachmittagkaffeeklatschkränzchen
xyz abc
Canada
Local time: 03:44
English translation:regular get-together for coffee on a Saturday afternoon
Explanation:
I think it sounds a little better with the "Saturday afternoon" at the end.

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Note added at 11 hrs 4 mins (2003-12-31 06:23:26 GMT)
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I\'ll have some humble pie with my coffee, please. I had not realised \"Kaffeeklatsch\", an expression I have always liked, was so popular in the US. I have asked the asker to clarify the target version of English (I see she is in Canada) and am still waiting for a response.

PS. I do know the actual derivation of \"humble pie\", in case anyone tries to tell me!I don\'t think it woiuld go with coffee - it sounds \"offal\".
Selected response from:

Robin Salmon
Australia
Local time: 19:44
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +7Saturday afternoon coffee klatschntext
4 +3Saturday afternoon coffee and gossip circle
Richard Benham
4 +2regular get-together for coffee on a Saturday afternoonRobin Salmon
4Samstagnachmittagkaffeeklatschkränzchen ("Ladies Saturday Club") (for UK English)
Textklick
4Saturday afternoon girly get-together
jerrie
5 -2Saturaday afternoon hen partylindaellen
1 +2Saturday afternoon coffee&conversation clubIlse Flick


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
Samstagnachmittagkaffeeklatschkränzchen
Saturday afternoon coffee klatsch


Explanation:
or: Saturday afternoon coffee get-together

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Note added at 3 mins (2003-12-30 19:22:55 GMT)
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or: Saturday afternoon coffee chat


    Reference: http://www.google.de/search?hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=coffee...
    Reference: http://www.google.de/search?hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=coffee...
ntext
United States
Local time: 03:44
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 2954

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  swisstell: so "internationalized", it should be left intact
6 mins

agree  silvia glatzhofer: definitely the best translation, as all the "hen" and "girl" versions rule out the men who, I dare say, love gossip as much as women.
9 mins

agree  xxxlone: hear, hear, right you are Glatzhofer!
42 mins

agree  Robert Kleemaier
1 hr

agree  roneill: absolutely!
1 hr

disagree  Gareth McMillan: Agree with robtrans: English speakers don't know this word. And a dico which tries give it English validity is obviously compiled by dic(k)heads. Ri(dic)ulous. ADD: Of course they do, and in greater numbers than a handful of German Americans.
4 hrs
  -> The term is used occasionally in the US, where there is a history of German immigration. At the end of the day, Kaffeeklatsch is a German word for a German custom. In England, people don't get together in the afternoon to have coffee and cake, do they?

agree  Laurel Porter: Pardon, gareth and robtrans, but in the US, particularly on the east coast, coffee klatsch is very well known. I'd still opt for one of the others, but if this were for the US "Klatsch" would certainly be acceptable.
5 hrs

agree  Richard Benham: For US consumption "coffee klatsch" or even "Kaffeeklatsch" seems fine. I have long since got over the shock hearing this word from the mouths of non-Germanophone Americans.
5 hrs

agree  Maureen Holm, J.D., LL.M.: They may be sure how to spell it, but they know it. Otherwise, you'd have to do a turn on "coffee ring," a pun for the iced pecan pastry.
8 hrs

neutral  Hilary Davies Shelby: Good for the US - klatsch is unknown in the UK
20 hrs

neutral  Robin Salmon: I have withdrawn my previous "disagree", because Google shows the term is pretty well known in the US and Canada. It is not generally known in UK and Australia, though, even despite a reasonable number of German migrants to the latter.
1 day 6 hrs
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -2
Saturaday afternoon hen party


Explanation:
I realize I left out "Kaffeeklatsch"
which means "coffee-gossip," but such a wonderful German expression can only be translated with poetic licence. I'm sure lots of people will answer this one, because it is FUN.

lindaellen
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 206

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gareth McMillan: This is one everybody understands ,old as the hills and modern as space travel- they may not like the negative implications, but too bad- "Klatch" is pretty negative.
4 hrs

disagree  Laurel Porter: Sorry, any American woman my age or younger (I'm 40) would bristle at this term. It sets my (hen's?) teeth on edge BIG TIME - I'd avoid this one, unless it's meant to be belittling or pejorative.
5 hrs
  -> Dear Laurel, Sorry not to be as PC as you like, but "Kaffeeklatsch" is not pejorative, but "cute" or shall we say diminuative. I don't meet my friends for a "KK" - even if that's what we do. We would only say it in jest, just as we would use "hen party."

disagree  Hilary Davies Shelby: here in scotland, at least, a hen party is the get-together that a woman's friends hold for her the night before her wedding...
20 hrs

disagree  Richard Benham: I agree with Hilary--I was just too chicken to say anything before.
23 hrs
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Saturday afternoon coffee&conversation club


Explanation:
this is a possible cultutal translation

Ilse Flick
Local time: 03:44
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 55

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Gareth McMillan: Might be ok for gissips who like to think they're above gossip.
4 hrs

agree  Laurel Porter: not bad
5 hrs

agree  Richard Benham: Good, because you've included the sense of "kränzchen", but see my suggestion.
5 hrs

neutral  Maureen Holm, J.D., LL.M.: stilted - reminds me of those forced foreign language conversation sessions
22 hrs
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Saturday afternoon girly get-together


Explanation:
Saturday afternoon get-together for a good old gossip

Girls get-together for a coffee and a chat on Saturday afternoon

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Note added at 2003-12-31 10:57:08 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In UK \'coffee mornings\' are very popular, for fund-raising, getting together etc. (The chatting/gossiping etc is implied...if there is a theme/specific aim for the get together, that would be mentioned).

So, why not just have:

Coffee afternoon - Saturday(s)
Coffee afternoons (to be held) on Saturday
Saturday coffee afternoons

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:44
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1469

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gareth McMillan: Gossip is implied here. But it's sexist. Aren't the men allowed gossip? Maybe not- wouldn't know how (heh,heh). Happy New Year jerrie! ADD: Ellen, if women found it offensive, they wouldn't say it, would they? But they do (say it).
4 hrs

disagree  ezbounty@aol.co: "girly" would be offensive for the girls getting together
5 hrs
  -> Hence..."girls get together"... I live in UK, and we refer to a weekend for the ladies as a girly/girlie weekend...likewise girls night out etc

disagree  Laurel Porter: Usually "girly" is a jokey adjective meaning pink and fluffy, ultrafeminine; "girlie" is most often used for strip joints etc.; I've never heard either used to describe a girls' get-together. Also, gossips rarely call it that when THEY do it! HNY, all...
5 hrs
  -> So you never say..."let's get together for a good old gossip"...I do!

agree  Andrea Appel
18 hrs

agree  Hilary Davies Shelby: i like all of these - and my friends' emails announcing such gatherings usually have "Girly" something in the title! I think its totally acceptable - at least for late-twenties-mid thirties, in both UK and US in my experience
20 hrs
  -> Thanks, and a Happy New Year!!!

disagree  Natalie Chandler: Girly has slight connotations of an underwear party... or worse... and it would be rather alcohol than coffee consumed (this coming from an under 30 UK female point of view) Coffee afternoon is safer!
2 days 15 hrs
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Samstagnachmittagkaffeeklatschkränzchen
regular get-together for coffee on a Saturday afternoon


Explanation:
I think it sounds a little better with the "Saturday afternoon" at the end.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs 4 mins (2003-12-31 06:23:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I\'ll have some humble pie with my coffee, please. I had not realised \"Kaffeeklatsch\", an expression I have always liked, was so popular in the US. I have asked the asker to clarify the target version of English (I see she is in Canada) and am still waiting for a response.

PS. I do know the actual derivation of \"humble pie\", in case anyone tries to tell me!I don\'t think it woiuld go with coffee - it sounds \"offal\".

Robin Salmon
Australia
Local time: 19:44
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 293

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ezbounty@aol.co: looser, but good too
1 hr

agree  Laurel Porter
1 hr

neutral  Richard Benham: You think it's about coffee??? It would be good if you added "and gossip". Umble pie: pie made from umbles (entrails), formerly given to servants.
1 hr
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Samstagnachmittagkaffeeklatschkränzchen
Saturday afternoon coffee and gossip circle


Explanation:
Partly inspired by somebody's (the system won't let me look at other people's answers while I'm composing my own, unless I open another window, and I can't be bothered) suggestion, except I have replaced "conversation club" with "gossip circle".

I thin the implication is more of gossip than of more elevated forms of conversation, and "club" kind of implies something a bit more formal, with memberships and a constitution, etc.

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Note added at 6 hrs 6 mins (2003-12-31 01:25:11 GMT)
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I **think** the implication.... I should not mention myself in the same sentence as the word \"thin\".

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Note added at 8 hrs 51 mins (2003-12-31 04:10:51 GMT)
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This is a genuine request for information: is there in any justification for the assumption on the part of some contributors that a Kaffeeklatsch is a strictly feminine affair? I am aware of instances where this title was applied to gatherings to which both sexes were invited--but outside Germany: one such event was held by the local German club, the other by a university German students\' club.

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Note added at 16 hrs 1 min (2003-12-31 11:20:37 GMT)
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In response to Klaus Herrmann\'s information, I would add that, whether we like it or not, gossip is regarded as a typically feminine pursuit in Anglophone cultures too. So I see no need to change my suggestion to reflect this presumption: in short, I think it is already there.

Richard Benham
France
Local time: 10:44
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 777

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maureen Holm, J.D., LL.M.: Saturday afternoon gossip session - could work since the coffee is a given. - ok, then tea and sympathy
2 hrs
  -> Thanks. But I like "circle" for "kränzchen", and don't forget a British readership might assume tea rather than coffee.

neutral  Klaus Herrmann: Following your RFI: In Germany, a Kaffeeklatsch is limited to women. 'Klatschen' (pretty much like 'tratschen') is perceived as a typical female activity. Exception: there's Kaffeeklatsch on TV, hosted by an outspokenly gay male host!
10 hrs
  -> Thanks Klaus.

agree  Hilary Davies Shelby: i like this - and i think that the "gossip" implies women - and none of the women i know would be offended by my saying that - we freely admit to enjoying it! ;-)
14 hrs
  -> Thanks.

agree  Gareth McMillan: Well done hilary for jumping the hypocracy barrier. ADD: OK, I agree in principle, but maybe a bit wordy, I just like the term hen party better- I kept hens once- wow, what a racket when they get their feathers ruffled over something! Perfect analogy.
17 hrs
  -> You could have made that an "agree"! And that's "hypocrisy" Gareth. HNY to all colleagues.
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19 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Samstagnachmittagkaffeeklatschkränzchen
Samstagnachmittagkaffeeklatschkränzchen ("Ladies Saturday Club") (for UK English)


Explanation:
If this is to convey an equivalent concept, rather than be a daft literal translation, then that should be it. (Lovely long word) Here, ladies would drink coffee in the morning, but would take tea in the afternoon. "Gossip" would, I am sure, be out of the question in this country were the attendees ladies ;-)
The male of the species would also refer e.g. to his "Friday Club". A regular lunchtime meeting with friends for a spirited exchange of ideas. Without coffee/tea, but possibly with other liquid refreshment. Gosh, we are getting our knickers in a twist here...

Textklick
Local time: 09:44
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1097

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Richard Benham: Two points: Words over about 20 or 30 letters are incomprehensible to most English speakers, (2) Please don't use the "word" attendee; it makes me want to puke!/ (1) No longer than Schuetzenfest is OK, (2) did you have to bring that up? HNY
1 hr
  -> Don't you ever think it makes sense to say "xxxxxx" (a German event involving xxxxx). As for chundering, I can't help it if it's a national sport in Oz. Try rugby instead ;-p. Have a good New Year, matey. :-) Chris
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