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18th century German...

English translation: teapot

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03:35 Jul 6, 2000
German to English translations [PRO]
German term or phrase: 18th century German...
The bit I'm having trouble with is capitalised. The text comes from a description of an Easter Fair in Leipzig in 1710, where various porcelain manufacturers exhibited their goods: "Erstlich fndet man Geschirre als Tisch-Krüge, THEE.BOTTGENS, Türkische Caffée-Kannen, Bouteillen..." I thought "Thee.Bottgens" might be teapots, but did such things exist at that time?
Heather
English translation:teapot
Explanation:
Previous answers have revealed that tea was known in Europe at the time. I believe that "Thee Bottgens" refer to round teapots, which are typical for Northern Germany (Frisia). "Thee" although written with double e certainly refers to tea, and "bottge" may be an old dialect word for "Bottich" - I have heard this word used on the island of Norderney referring to moderately sized round barrel-type containers.

I hope this help a little for clarification.

Kind regards - Ronald Wiles
Selected response from:

Wilestrans
Germany
Local time: 04:02
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
nateapot
Wilestrans
naYes, they didWilliam Scheckel
naWhy notDan McCrosky


  

Answers


16 mins
Why not


Explanation:
http://www.stashtea.com/facts.htm

Why not, tea came to Europe in 1560 and the Yanks threw it into Boston harbor
in 177?.

Dan McCrosky
Local time: 04:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1541
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24 mins
Yes, they did


Explanation:
Teapots, samovars and the like definitely existed in the early 18th century. And to answer Dan's question mark, we tossed the tea into Boston Harbor on Dec. 16, 1773. Will



William Scheckel
Local time: 04:02
PRO pts in pair: 139
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
teapot


Explanation:
Previous answers have revealed that tea was known in Europe at the time. I believe that "Thee Bottgens" refer to round teapots, which are typical for Northern Germany (Frisia). "Thee" although written with double e certainly refers to tea, and "bottge" may be an old dialect word for "Bottich" - I have heard this word used on the island of Norderney referring to moderately sized round barrel-type containers.

I hope this help a little for clarification.

Kind regards - Ronald Wiles

Wilestrans
Germany
Local time: 04:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 46
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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