KudoZ home » German to English » Other

Tragling (Biologie)

English translation: clinging young, parent clinger

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
09:08 Aug 9, 2000
German to English translations [PRO]
German term or phrase: Tragling (Biologie)
Der Mensch ist von seinem biologischen Ursprung her ein sogenannter Tragling. Das Heiss dads Junge bleibt nicht .....im Nest zurück.....sondern wird herumgetragen.
Zeus
Local time: 02:09
English translation:clinging young, parent clinger
Explanation:
Eichhorn's biology dictionary (Langenscheidt) gives "clinging young" and "parent clinger" for "Tragling" and labels them as terms from behavioral biology.
Selected response from:

John Schweinsberg
Grading comment
Thank you.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
namarsupial infantRike Zietlow
nago with the clingingNancy Schmeing
naSee below
Anthony Frey
na[paraphrase; see below]
Tom Funke
naSome hints for further searchesUlrike Lieder
naso-called carryling, or . . .Cami Townsend
naclinging young, parent clingerJohn Schweinsberg
nacarrierNancy Schmeing
nasee below
Elisabeth Moser


  

Answers


22 mins
see below


Explanation:
in all meinen Buechern habe ich nicht diesen Ausdruck gefunden.
Ich nehme an, dass es sich hier um eine Wortschoepfung handelt,
deshalb "sogenannt." Ich meine, dass diese Bezeichnung dafuer
steht, dass das Kleinkind etc. herumgetragen wird--daher Tragling,
also someone who will be carried around/about. Ich wuerde also
versuchen hier auch eine Neuschoepfung zu kreieren und diese
vielleicht noch mit Fussnote erklaeren oder auch den Ausdruck
Tragling lassen (vielleicht mit Erklaerung), denn er scheint sich
nicht verbatum ins Englische uebertragen zu lassen.

Elisabeth Moser
United States
Local time: 21:09
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 772
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

37 mins
so-called carryling, or . . .


Explanation:
Because of the use of "so-called" I think it would be appropriate to invent a word here, like "carryling." The URL below briefly discusses exactly what you describe, placing "Tragling" in quotation marks.. There are only 31 hits on Northern Light for "Tragling," which shows to what extent the term is recent and/or limited in usage. I would recommend using "carryling" in apposition to "nestling" as mentioned in the next sentence. Or, because the German variant "Tragling" has enjoyed at least some popularity, whereas "carryling" is non-existent, you could use the German. "As far as their biological origins are concerned, human beings are what some German scientists refer to as Traglinge, literally 'carrylings,' because . . . "


    Reference: http://www.apothekenumschau.de/presse/messages/100040537.htm...
Cami Townsend
PRO pts in pair: 227
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

57 mins
clinging young, parent clinger


Explanation:
Eichhorn's biology dictionary (Langenscheidt) gives "clinging young" and "parent clinger" for "Tragling" and labels them as terms from behavioral biology.

John Schweinsberg
PRO pts in pair: 55
Grading comment
Thank you.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

57 mins
carrier


Explanation:
Also spent a lot of time with URL's, and didn't find the word standardized in English. I have, however, heard this concept mentioned. Similarly, I came up with carrier, because it is a noun that expresses this carrying behavior, documented in the URL below.


    http:/ / monkeymaddness.com/ apes_monkeys/ bbm66.htm
Nancy Schmeing
Canada
Local time: 21:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 328
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
Some hints for further searches


Explanation:
It would seem that Tragling is not as unusual as we might think (I must say that I hadn't heard the term). A Google search netted some 37 or so hits. The excerpt from the URL listed below is probably one of the more informative ones as it shows the different classifications of newborn mammals. I am sure that there is a Latin-based term for Tragling, for instance, a Nesthocker is a nidicolous animal, a Nesthocker a nidifugous animal.
While I did find Nesthocker in Muret-Sanders, they do not list Tragling, and unfortunately, my Eichborn WB Biologie is only E-G. You should be able to find the scientific term in a biology or zoology glossary.
Sorry I couldn't be of more help.

Der menschliche Säugling ist ein Tragling
In der Biologie werden neugeborene Säugetiere nach folgenden Gesichtspunkten unterschieden:

Nesthocker:
 nackt
 geschlossene Augen und Gehörgänge
 wenig Ähnlichkeit mit den Eltern
 kann sich nicht alleine fortbewegen
 Beispiel: Maus, Kaninchen
Nestflüchter:
 die körperliche Reife ist bei der Geburt abgeschlossen
 sieht den Eltern sehr ähnlich
 kann sich nach sehr kurzer Zeit alleine fortbewegen
 Beispiel: Pferd, Antilope
Tragling:
 sieht den Eltern relativ ähnlich
 kann sich nicht alleine fortbewegen
 besitzt von Geburt an einen ausgeprägten Greifreflex
 Beispiel: verschiedene Affenarten (aktiver T.), Känguruh (passiver T.)
Der menschliche Säugling ist der Gruppe der Traglinge zuzuordnen. Der Klammer- und Festhaltereflex ist noch heute vorhanden (z. B. geschlossene Fäustchen beim schlafenden Kind). Auch die Spreiz-Anhock-Stellung der Beine, die ein Kind einnimmt, wenn es hochgehoben wird, deutet auf die seit Urzeiten vorhandene Erwartung des Getragenwerdens hin. Zwar besitzt der Mensch kein Fell mehr, an dem sich das Kind festhalten kann, dafür ist er jedoch in der Lage, ein Werkzeug - die Tragehilfe - zu benutzen.



    Reference: http://home.t-online.de/home/tragetuch/main.htm#tragling
Ulrike Lieder
Local time: 18:09
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 3525
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
[paraphrase; see below]


Explanation:
_Carrier_ would refer to the parent, not the young. _Clinging young_ etc. may be correct but isn't readily comprehensible. --- You have some typos in your question. Assuming you mean "Das heißt das Junge..." I'd paraphrase and combine the two sentences, while avoiding the gender trap: >>By virtue of its biologic origin, the human [baby] isn't left behind in the nest; the parents carry it around."

Tom Funke
Local time: 21:09
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 2419
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
marsupial infant


Explanation:
Strange as it may seem, the promoters of various baby slings seem to have adopted this as the English term for Tragling. Depending on the context, it may be what you want.

Below are two websites which use this term, but there are many similar ones. The latter one is in different languages, and the term "Tragling" in the title of a German pediatric paper has been translated into English in this way.



    Reference: http://www.mdi.ca/cuddlekarrier/links.html
    Reference: http://www.didymos.de/englisch/experten_e.htm
Rike Zietlow
Local time: 02:09
PRO pts in pair: 8
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
go with the clinging


Explanation:
This is probably right. I have read about the concept and didn't remember the word exactly, but I'm pretty sure that was it. Nancy

Nancy Schmeing
Canada
Local time: 21:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 328
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
See below


Explanation:
I can confirm John's suggestions as regards the Eichborn Fachwb. Biologie. A quick search in Britannica.com under marsurpials offered no exact one-to-one equivalent for "Tragling", but expands its meanings as follows: The common opossum breeds from mid-winter to late autumn. One litter is produced annually in cooler regions, but as many as three in warmer ones. After only 12 to 16 days of gestation (average 12.5), an opossum may have as many as 25 young; the average number is 10. The young are born blind, naked, and grublike and weigh only 2 g (0.07 ounce). Using their clawed forelimbs, they instinctively struggle toward the mother's fur-lined pouch; those that reach the pouch seek out a nipple--there usually are 13 of them--and achieve a firm oral grip as the nipple swells. Some newborns never succeed in entering the pouch, and others die because there are more young born than there are teats to serve them. After four or five weeks in the pouch the young spend an additional eight or nine weeks >>>clinging to the mother's back<<. The notion that the opossum gives birth through its nose probably comes from the female's habit of putting her face into the pouch to clean it just before giving birth.
Hope this might help! You can also look under Kangaroo!



    Reference: http://www.britannica.com
Anthony Frey
United States
Local time: 21:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 444
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search