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gleichlautendes Verb

English translation: participles of a correspondent verb

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:gleichlautend (auch:)
English translation:participles of a correspondent verb
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23:32 Oct 5, 2001
German to English translations [PRO]
German term or phrase: gleichlautendes Verb
General Context:
Foreword of compact technical dictionary

Specific context:
>>Gestrichen wurden insbesondere Begriffe der Allgemeinsprache, fachfremde Termini, veraltete Begriffe, Partizipien zum gleichlautenden Verb.
Tom Funke
Local time: 14:41
participles formed by 'ge' + infinitive
Explanation:
Das kann vielleicht gemeint sein.
Partizipien sind ja im Deutschen nie gleichlautend mit dem Verb (Nennform).

Ich denke hier z.B. an

sehen - gesehen
lesen - gelesen
fahren - gefahren
wachsen - gewachsen.

Eigentlich fallen mir dazu so wenig Beispiele ein, dass es gar keinen Sinn mehr macht!

HTH ;o)
Selected response from:

Uschi (Ursula) Walke
Local time: 05:41
Grading comment
The customer agency's response to my note:
>>I suggest the following translation concerning 'gleichlautend' [in this context]: ***... and participles of a correspondent verb***. But I marked this passage for proofreading by our editors.<<
-- I haven't heard if that was final or not. Uschi came very close to that. But thanks to all for your valiant efforts (I suspect all the more difficult since the source text probably wasn't entirely lucid on this point.) Tom


4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1homophonicErik Macki
4 +1participle forms
Mary Worby
4participles of an homonymous verb(?)Marcus Malabad
4participles formed by 'ge' + infinitiveUschi (Ursula) Walke
4homonymous verb
Alexander Schleber
3 +1which are written like the infinitivexxxAbu Amaal


  

Answers


33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
which are written like the infinitive


Explanation:
This might mean that
both laufend and gelaufen are omitted
but that gegessen and getrunken are in,
since there are no alterations in the infinitive apart from the addition of standard elements.

I take gleichlautend in the sense of "identical".



xxxAbu Amaal
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Uschi (Ursula) Walke: same idea! The word is ""regular"" as far as participles are concerned. Forgot about the 1. in my answer :-(
20 mins
  -> good thought - "regular participles" sounds great
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40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
homonymous verb


Explanation:
homonym = a word identical with another in pronounciation, but differing from it in spelling and meaning (Webster's).

This might not be understood by non-experts, but the translation of "gleichlautend" (identical) would be misleading in this instance, I think.


    Webster's Comprehensive Dictionary
    Oxfor Duden
Alexander Schleber
Belgium
Local time: 20:41
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2340
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43 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
participles formed by 'ge' + infinitive


Explanation:
Das kann vielleicht gemeint sein.
Partizipien sind ja im Deutschen nie gleichlautend mit dem Verb (Nennform).

Ich denke hier z.B. an

sehen - gesehen
lesen - gelesen
fahren - gefahren
wachsen - gewachsen.

Eigentlich fallen mir dazu so wenig Beispiele ein, dass es gar keinen Sinn mehr macht!

HTH ;o)

Uschi (Ursula) Walke
Local time: 05:41
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 492
Grading comment
The customer agency's response to my note:
>>I suggest the following translation concerning 'gleichlautend' [in this context]: ***... and participles of a correspondent verb***. But I marked this passage for proofreading by our editors.<<
-- I haven't heard if that was final or not. Uschi came very close to that. But thanks to all for your valiant efforts (I suspect all the more difficult since the source text probably wasn't entirely lucid on this point.) Tom

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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
participle forms


Explanation:
As far as I can see, it means the participle forms of the (identical) verb, so if they've already got 'laufen', they'll delete 'laufend', 'gelaufen' ...

Presumably, if they've got participle forms when no verb is included (e.g. gleichlautend(!) - no verb gleichlauten) - they can stay.

That's how I'd read it anyway!

HTH

Mary

Mary Worby
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2770

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Trudy Peters
4 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
participles of an homonymous verb(?)


Explanation:
hi Tom!

These are just my (tropical) musings on Alexander's answer above. I too automatically translated your phrase to 'participles of homonymous verbs' but was hard pressed to find examples in German. I found some examples in French though:

1) Homonymy is one of the pitfalls in machine translation so input sentences are tagged with indicators of suffixes, prefixes, word divisions, phrase/clause boudaries. For example, the noun cónvict and its homonymous verb convíct are categorized so that the target text comes out correct.

2) Homonymous verb forms (e.g., il peignait, from peigner , "to comb" or peindre , "to paint") are always included under both infinitive entries to avoid confusion but may be omitted for reasons of conciseness. There may be examples in German but nothing comes to mind right now.

3) The OED considers English homonymic verbs and nouns as separate entries (e.g., fill, tip, etc.). However, this is not the case in German: das Treffen comes after the verb 'treffen' under the same entry. In this case, your phrase seems to make sense: the participle (infinitive?) of homonymic verbs are omitted.

4) I don't think that what is meant here are the ge- particles of German verbs since they are never included as separate dictionary entries under any circumstance. I also don't think that gleichlautend means 'identical' in this case (what is an 'identical verb'?).

Just my two centavos. Regards from the tropics and congratulations on the new 'entry' in your family! ;-)

M



Marcus Malabad
Canada
Local time: 20:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in TagalogTagalog
PRO pts in pair: 1782
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
homophonic


Explanation:
This is a jargon term in linguistics corresponding to "homophonic" (literally, "same-sound") in English.


    ATA Accredited
    Ph.C. in linguistics
Erik Macki
Local time: 11:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 384

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Thijs van Dorssen: Wow, super!! But unfortunately, not too many people will get the message and call you a pervert if you use this word.
1 hr
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