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Alsterwasser / Radler / Radlermaß

English translation: shandy / shandygaff / flavored beer

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Alsterwasser / Radler / Radlermaß
English translation:shandy / shandygaff / flavored beer
Entered by: Dan McCrosky
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

00:51 Aug 18, 2000
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
German term or phrase: Alsterwasser / Radler / Radlermaß
As everybody knows, "Alsterwasser" / "Radler" / "Radlermaß" are three of perhaps many more names for a roughly 50/50 mixture of beer and lemon soda / 7-Up / Sprite / sparkling lemonade / fizzy lemonade. The only English translations I know are "shandy" and the longer form "shandygaff". I have a few questions to this very important subject and would be very interested in answers from South America, Africa, Canada, Australia and the Far East as well as from the UK and US:

1. Does anyone know any other English or German names for this drink?

2. Is the name "shandy" now "out" in the UK and if so what is now "in"?

3. What is the most universal name for the soft drink part; lemon soda / 7-up / Sprite / sparkling lemonade / fizzy lemonade or something completely different? Here I am especially interested in answers from the different parts of the world.

4. If an American were told to describe the drink without the brand names "7-Up" or "Sprite", what term would s/he use for the soft drink part?

5. Does anyone know any brand names for this product in cans or bottles? I have only been able to find "Shanta Super Shandy" from Indonesia so far.

- TIA - Dan
Dan McCrosky
Local time: 18:09
additional information see below
Explanation:
Hi Dan,
regarding the apparent confusion about the German lemonade, here are a few more links as reading material. It is my understanding, that the German \"Zitronenlimo\" is a distinct kind of lemonade. 7-up and Sprite are often compared to it, but it\'s not the same thing. In the links you will find some information about the production of lemonade.\"Zitronenlimo\" is clear and slightly carbonated (not as much as 7-up/Sprite). I would personally compare it to the American lemonade, although this one is non-carbonated. My reasoning is, that \"Limo\" is not made out of artificial ingredients, such as the others. The main ingredients are water, fruit and/or fruit syrup (excerpt: Dazu mußte das Wasser mittels einer Pumpe mit Kohlensäure versetzt werden. Basis für die Limonaden stellten heimische Früchte, aber auch ein fertiges Sirup dar). I hope this will help you!

Renate

http://www.breumo.de/firmengeschichte/limonaden.html
http://www.bad-duerrheimer.de/
http://www.breumo.de/firmengeschichte/limonadenprod.html
http://www.pfh-goettingen.de/marktforschung/limo.htm http://www.cegep-ste-foy.qc.ca/~allemand/Etudiants/H97/P05/P...
http://www.brauer-bund.de/seite/news/presse/mix.htm
http://www.breworld.com/austria/wheat.html
http://www.cls-online.de/biergarten/red/b-lex.htm
http://www.deutschland-tourismus.de/d/3277_3148.html
Selected response from:

xxxG_Edition
Grading comment
It is too bad that I didn't receive any answers from other parts of the world because my product won't even be sold in the US or Germany. That does not mean that your answers weren't appreciated. Every answer contained something useful, either for the current project or for the future. It is also a shame that we still cannot split up the KudoZ points. As I have continuing work for this beverage customer and another very large German beverage customer, I have to pick reni's answer because she provided the most good Internet references. Thank you everyone! Dan
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naSee below.
Tom Funke
nasee belowUlrike Lieder
naWhere are the answers from South America, Africa, Australia, the Near East and the Far East?Dan McCrosky
naadditional information see belowxxxG_Edition
nasee belowBeth Kantus
naAddition from UKAgius Language & Translation
naAmerican lemonadeDan McCrosky
naShandyAgius Language & Translation
naGespritztes
Jessica Spengler
nasee belowBeth Kantus
naRadlerxxxG_Edition
naread belowTadej Gregorcic


  

Answers


32 mins
read below


Explanation:
Ok, this isn't going to be _very_ helpful, but here (Slovenia, Europe - but there must be other places with the same names), there are several mixtures with beer - radler (beer and fanta), diesel (beer and coke), panaché (beer and a kind of juice [I think]), the first and last also being commercial names of canned drinks. There are more, which I can't remember right now - by the way, I didn't realise such disgusting mixtures are drunk all over the world ;)

Tadej Gregorcic
Native speaker of: Native in SlovenianSlovenian
PRO pts in pair: 12
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1 hr
Shandy


Explanation:
Hiya - Shandy is still 'in' in the UK in terms of 'words' although it is not seen as the 'in' drink. The only other variant of this that I can think of is a 'lager/bitter top' - this is not 50/50 though. This is when a lager or bitter is given a 'dash' of lemonade on the top.

Agius Language & Translation
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 132
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3 hrs
Gespritztes


Explanation:
Down here in Freiburg, Germany, I've also heard people refer to this kind of beer mixture as a "Gespritztes". But I think this sometimes also means a mixture of beer and mineral water/soda water.

I don't know of any official American English translation for this drink, but seeing as a Weinschorle is a "wine spritzer" in America, maybe you could say "beer spritzer" (though you'd probably get a funny look).

As an American, I suppose I would say "lemon soda" for the soft drink part if I had to avoid brand names.

- Jessica Spengler

Jessica Spengler
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:09
Native speaker of: English
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5 hrs
see below


Explanation:
Can't offer much help. People here look at us like we're crazy when we mention mixing beer with any kind of soda! As for the 7-up type beverage, the generic term I've seen used for soft drinks such as 7-up and Sprite is "lemon-lime soda." HTH, Beth

Beth Kantus
United States
Local time: 12:09
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 924
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6 hrs
Radler


Explanation:
Being from Munich/Germany I've known these drinks for all my life. The Radler was invented in 1922 in Munich. A "Helles (Bier)" is mixed 50/50 with "Zitronenlimonade", which is the clear equivalent of the american "lemonade".
In the United States (and even in Germany),I have seen it being mixed with Sprite and Seven-Up.
In one of the links below, the "Radler" is compared to a "shandy with lemon-lime soda".

http://home.earthlink.net/~pasbier/Radler.html


    Reference: http://www.hof.baynet.de/~manfred.wirth/bierdrinks.htm
    Reference: http://www.vips-neunkirchen.de/Inhalt/Einkaufs-Tips/Getranke...
xxxG_Edition
PRO pts in pair: 19
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6 hrs
American lemonade


Explanation:
Please correct me if I'm wrong but I have always thought lemonade in America was the drink little kids sell from orange crate stands along the sidewalk. Home made, from freshly squeezed lemons, tap water (definitely not carbonated), sugar and lots of ice. Lemon soda (or lemon-lime soda as Beth mentioned) is the horrible artificial gook in bottles and cans sold under names like 7-Up or Sprite. But like I said, please correct me of I am wrong. I am still waiting for more answers from the rest of the world because it could well be that in the UK for example, stuff like 7-Up and Sprite might really be called lemonade or maybe fizzy lemonade. - Dan

Dan McCrosky
Local time: 18:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1541
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6 hrs
Addition from UK


Explanation:
Hi Dan
7-up and Sprite are the lemon and lime carbonated drinks over here the same as you have in the US...but lemonade here is also the horrible gook (I think that's what you called it), carbonated and flavoured with lemon (..ish). We have several types of this but if you went into a bar and asked for a lemonade or a shandy, you would get the fizzy stuff (usualy Schweppes) on tap. A search through all my dictionaries and for your 3 terms, 'Shandy' was the only English term offered.

Agius Language & Translation
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 132
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7 hrs
see below


Explanation:
You're right - while lemonade is not necessarily fresh-squeezed and home-made and not exclusively sold by kids (saw a lemonade stand last weekend near a boat show -- 75 cents a glass! How's that for the cost of living going up?), lemonade is non-sparkling, not the soda type.

If you want a generic description for the stuff like 7-up and Sprite (generally sold in cans), it would probably be something like lemon soda, or lemon-lime soda as Beth noted. Also, as Beth noted, the overall generic term is soft drink, but that also includes all the various colas.

However, I'd say that 7-Up has become almost a generic name, not unlike Kleenex or Bandaid, or Coke, to stay with the beverage industry. If you ask for a 7-Up, the waitperson might tell you that they only have Sprite. (Actually, 7-Up is so ubiquitous that that might a rare occurrence, but anyway.) Non-soda drinkers like myself often used to have a hard time finding a non-carbonated soft drink in a fast food place (I refuse to use the term resturant), the only alternative was iced tea. But now that's changed, and I think that the popularity of these carbonated, artificial drinks is actually on the wane.

Ulrike Lieder
Local time: 09:09
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 3525
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1 day21 hrs
See below.


Explanation:

(4): If it has to be truly generic (rather than "de facto standard", like 7-Up or Sprite or Uncola), in the most general context including kids and picnicking adults and the great unwashed, most of whom don’t show up in AltaVista searches, "pop" is probably number one in the US (though _lemon pop_ would not be very common. In a more adult or 'gehobenen' context (e.g. adult-drink mixing and contexts likely to show up in a Web search) _lemon soda_ or lemon-lime soda. (But in Boston: _lemon tonic_). --
Having said this, here is what comes up on AltaVista (English) in whatever contexts, meanings and geographies: 1,892 pages found. Word count: lemon lime tonic: 6; lemon soft drink: 37; lemon lime pop: 42; lemon pop: 115; lemon lime soft drink: 116; lemon tonic: 159; lemon soda: 320; lemon lime soda: about 500.

Also on AltaVista: (English) "beer spritzer": 7 pages found. word count: beer spritzer: 44. (True, that doesn’t make it common.)

Why not forget the whole thing and try _Long Island Tea_. Zutaten: 1 cl vodka. 1 cl gin. 1 cl light rum. 1 cl tequila. juice of 1/2 lemon. 1 dash cola. combine ingredients and pour over ice ... www.s-a-s.de/bar/coc/629.html

Sorry I can’t be more helpful. [Not my kind of drink.]




    see above :)
Tom Funke
Local time: 12:09
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 2419
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2 days2 hrs
Where are the answers from South America, Africa, Australia, the Near East and the Far East?


Explanation:
Where are the answers from South America, Africa, Australia, the Near East and the Far East?

I really appreciate all the help from Slovenia, the US, the UK and Germany but I need more information from other parts of the world. Thanks in advance for any help you can offer. - Dan


Dan McCrosky
Local time: 18:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1541
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2 days6 hrs
additional information see below


Explanation:
Hi Dan,
regarding the apparent confusion about the German lemonade, here are a few more links as reading material. It is my understanding, that the German \"Zitronenlimo\" is a distinct kind of lemonade. 7-up and Sprite are often compared to it, but it\'s not the same thing. In the links you will find some information about the production of lemonade.\"Zitronenlimo\" is clear and slightly carbonated (not as much as 7-up/Sprite). I would personally compare it to the American lemonade, although this one is non-carbonated. My reasoning is, that \"Limo\" is not made out of artificial ingredients, such as the others. The main ingredients are water, fruit and/or fruit syrup (excerpt: Dazu mußte das Wasser mittels einer Pumpe mit Kohlensäure versetzt werden. Basis für die Limonaden stellten heimische Früchte, aber auch ein fertiges Sirup dar). I hope this will help you!

Renate

http://www.breumo.de/firmengeschichte/limonaden.html
http://www.bad-duerrheimer.de/
http://www.breumo.de/firmengeschichte/limonadenprod.html
http://www.pfh-goettingen.de/marktforschung/limo.htm http://www.cegep-ste-foy.qc.ca/~allemand/Etudiants/H97/P05/P...
http://www.brauer-bund.de/seite/news/presse/mix.htm
http://www.breworld.com/austria/wheat.html
http://www.cls-online.de/biergarten/red/b-lex.htm
http://www.deutschland-tourismus.de/d/3277_3148.html

xxxG_Edition
PRO pts in pair: 19
Grading comment
It is too bad that I didn't receive any answers from other parts of the world because my product won't even be sold in the US or Germany. That does not mean that your answers weren't appreciated. Every answer contained something useful, either for the current project or for the future. It is also a shame that we still cannot split up the KudoZ points. As I have continuing work for this beverage customer and another very large German beverage customer, I have to pick reni's answer because she provided the most good Internet references. Thank you everyone! Dan
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 days2 hrs
see below


Explanation:
Hi Dan, I know the points are already awarded, but I ran across some more info that may or may not be of help. So here goes: there's a new product on the shelves here (Southern U.S.) which is a bottled mixture of beer and fruit juices. We bought some recently for a barbecue we hosted, and still had some in the fridge. It's brewed by Wm. Hooper & Co., Wilkes-Barre, PA, and is called "Hooch." The label on the neck of the bottle also calls it a "Flavored Beer." It comes in 3 flavors: lemon, orange, and berry. Unfortunately, I don't have the lemon one here, but the label for the orange one reads "English Original; Alcoholic Orange Brew; Sparkling Malt Beverage With Orange and Other Natural Flavors." The berry flavored one reads "Refreshing Brewed-In Assortment of Wild Berries, Not Too Sweet.Never Bitter; Red Brew; Malt Beverage with Natural Flavors." I'll have a look at the lemon one the next time I get to the store. I know this isn't Asia or S. America, but after reading your latest comments, the product sounded like something similar to what you're involved with. HTH, Beth.

Beth Kantus
United States
Local time: 12:09
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 924
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