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Gewicht, Gewichtskraft, Gewichtstück

English translation: weight, weight force, weighed object

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Gewicht, Gewichtskraft, Gewichtstück
English translation:weight, weight force, weighed object
Entered by: Beth Kantus
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07:54 Jun 29, 2001
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Physics
German term or phrase: Gewicht, Gewichtskraft, Gewichtstück
Can anyone explain the difference between these terms?
Here is the text:
Begriffe DIN 1305 (Jan. 1988)
1 Anwendungsbereich
2 Masse
3 Wägewert
4 Konventioneller Wägewert
5 Kraft
6 Gewichtskraft
7 Gewicht
8 Last

The descriptions are:
Kraft - Die Kraft F ist das Produkt aus der Masse m eines Körpers und der Beschleunigung a, die er durch die Kraft F erfährt oder erfahren würde.
F = m a

Gewichtskraft - Die Gewichtskraft FG eines Körpers der Masse m ist das Produkt aus Masse m und Fallbeschleunigung g.
FG = m g

Gewicht - Das Wort Gewicht wird vorwiegend in drei verschiedenen Bedeutungen gebraucht:
a) anstelle von Wägewert
b) als Kurzform für Gewichtskraft
c) als Kurzform for Gewichtsstück (siehe DIN 8120 Teil 2)
Wenn Mißverständnisse zu befürchten sind, soll anstelle des Wortes Gewicht die jeweils zutreffende Benennung Wägewert, Gewichtskraft oder Gewichtstück verwendet werden.

I have to distinguish somehow between Sections 6 and 7, and don't want to use Weight for both titles.
Also, since all I can find for Gewichtskraft and Gewichtstück is weight, the last sentence would be: To avoid misunderstanding, instead of weight use the respective relevant term: either weight value, weight, or weight. ?!

Any help would be very much appreciated!
Beth Kantus
United States
Local time: 10:17
weight, weight force, weighed object
Explanation:
I partially agree with Sven's explanation above. However, looking at the formula in Beth's text (FG = mg, where m is the mass and g is acceleration due to gravity), it's immediately apparent that this is the formula for weight due to the Earth's gravitational pull or simply 'weight'. Not the conventional everyday expression but the physics concept of weight, which is a force (as Sven says) very much dependent on location, e.g., the unit 'g' is different on the Moon's surface and on Earth.

While it is correct that gravitational force is the force that a body exerts on another (in our case, the Earth to our object with mass 'm'), the physics term for this very force is 'weight' or 'weight force'. This is the same term which has the formula above.

The link is to an article on how weight force is calculated and includes the very same formula written above. The second link is to an article on how an airplane's weight force shifts during flight.

Beth, you should translate sections 6 and 7 as 'weight force' and 'weight'. The confusion is alleviated when you continue translating the succeeding paragraph:

"Weight - the word 'weight' is used with three different meanings:
a) in place of weight value
b) as a short form of weight force
c) as a short form of weighted object
To avoid misunderstanding, use the words 'weight value', 'weight force' and 'weighted object'.

Still remember my second year at University...





Selected response from:

Marcus Malabad
Canada
Local time: 16:17
Grading comment
I would like to thank everyone for their help with this, especially Sven for his helpful explanaton.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +1weight, weight force, weighed objectMarcus Malabad
na +1weight, gravitational force, item [being; to be] weighed
Sven Petersson
nacommentKen Cox
naweight ....
GUSTL
naweight.transatgees
naweight forceKevin Fulton


  

Answers


32 mins
weight force


Explanation:
Richter's Technisches W'buch offers weight force for "Gewichtskraft" You might try weight load for "Gewichtstück"
HTH

Kevin Fulton
United States
Local time: 10:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

51 mins
weight ....


Explanation:
I found the following items:


DIN 1305

Masse, Wägewert, Kraft, Gewichtskraft, Last; Begriffe

Mass, weight value, force, weight-force, load; concepts

Jan 1988 Preisgr. 5

under this address:

http://www.ptb.de/deutsch/org/3/31/311/normen.htm

but don't ask me what the difference is...:-))


    see above
GUSTL
Local time: 16:17
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr peer agreement (net): +1
weight, gravitational force, item [being; to be] weighed


Explanation:
Your general experience tells you what is commonly meant with weight. But your perception only coincides with reality under certain circumstances! Let's test you perception of weight:

Take two scales, one modern electronic and antique balance scale consisting of two baskets and a stick. At sea level you weigh yourself on both. Result 75 kg on the antique and 74.893 on the electronic one. These two values are "Wägewert". The difference between them is a measuring error. Lets assume the electronic scale is true. Then your "Gewicht" is 74.893. The reading on the electronic scale was caused by the attraction between planet earth and yourself. This attraction resulted in a "Gewichtskraft" which pressed on the sensor in the scale. You, who stood on the scale, were the "Gewichtstück". Now, climbe a high mountain or go up to a high altitude in an aircraft. Weigh yourself again on the two scales. The antique one still shows 75 kg but the modern electronic one shows less, say 74.321. What happened? The "Gewichtskraft" is less, because you and planet earth are further apart.


    Native English speaking engineer.
Sven Petersson
Sweden
Local time: 16:17
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Johanna Timm, PhD: I wish I had had you as a physics teacher...
26 mins
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1 hr
weight.


Explanation:
The above is not really meant to be an answer, but the site won't let me make a general remark.

Idea for you: visit the BSI (British Standards Institute) web site, and see if you can find the standard for whatever is covered by DIN 1305. It might have equivalent terms.

transatgees
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:17
Native speaker of: English
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
weight, weight force, weighed object


Explanation:
I partially agree with Sven's explanation above. However, looking at the formula in Beth's text (FG = mg, where m is the mass and g is acceleration due to gravity), it's immediately apparent that this is the formula for weight due to the Earth's gravitational pull or simply 'weight'. Not the conventional everyday expression but the physics concept of weight, which is a force (as Sven says) very much dependent on location, e.g., the unit 'g' is different on the Moon's surface and on Earth.

While it is correct that gravitational force is the force that a body exerts on another (in our case, the Earth to our object with mass 'm'), the physics term for this very force is 'weight' or 'weight force'. This is the same term which has the formula above.

The link is to an article on how weight force is calculated and includes the very same formula written above. The second link is to an article on how an airplane's weight force shifts during flight.

Beth, you should translate sections 6 and 7 as 'weight force' and 'weight'. The confusion is alleviated when you continue translating the succeeding paragraph:

"Weight - the word 'weight' is used with three different meanings:
a) in place of weight value
b) as a short form of weight force
c) as a short form of weighted object
To avoid misunderstanding, use the words 'weight value', 'weight force' and 'weighted object'.

Still remember my second year at University...








    Reference: http://www.cord.edu/dept/physics/p128/lecture98_9.html
    Reference: http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/K-12/airplane/wrights/weight1.ht...
Marcus Malabad
Canada
Local time: 16:17
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in TagalogTagalog
PRO pts in category: 11
Grading comment
I would like to thank everyone for their help with this, especially Sven for his helpful explanaton.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sven Petersson: 1st word: same. 2nd word: US (right) or UK (doubtful) English? 3rd word: Better than mine.
13 mins
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1 day 6 hrs
comment


Explanation:
Agree with "weight" and "weight force", with the note that the latter term is used quite rarely in English.

As for 'Gewichtstueck", my guess is that is refers to a weight as is used with a balance -- note that "Gewichtssatz" is a set of weights.

Ken Cox
Local time: 16:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
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