KudoZ home » German to English » Poetry & Literature

Spigille

English translation: Spigille

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Spigille
English translation:Spigille
Entered by: Derek Gill Franßen
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

16:58 Aug 10, 2004
German to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
German term or phrase: Spigille
Childhood in Germany (late fifties)

Jeden Mittwoch kommt meine Tante Gisela zum Kaffeeklatsch. Meine Mutter sagt immer **Spigille** zu ihr, weil sie so spindeldürr und nervös und zappelig ist.

Never heard of a Spigille. Fortunately, the text describes what it is: a skinny and hyper person. Is there an English word for it that would lend itself to be used as a nickname?

TIA!!
Fantutti
Local time: 22:38
Spigille
Explanation:
This is just her nickname (Kosename), there is no translation for this. I have once heard of "Spargeltarzan" for skinny persons, but "Spigille"...
;-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2004-08-10 17:06:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I\'ve also heard of \"Zapplesuse\" bzw. \"Zappelphillip\"...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 mins (2004-08-10 17:12:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In my Hochdeutsch-Plattdeutsches Wörterbuch von Günter & Johanna Harte the word \"spillerig\" is given under \"dünn\"; the word \"spillbeent\" under \"dünnbeinig\".

An English version of this could be \"skin and bones\", \"birdlegs\", \"spindlelegs\" or \"spindelshanks\".
Selected response from:

Derek Gill Franßen
Germany
Local time: 07:38
Grading comment
Thank you so much Derek and all the others. Special thanks to Cilian for the final clarification. You guys were 10 steps ahead of me!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
3 +4Spigille
Derek Gill Franßen
3 +2Twiggy
Kim Metzger
3Fidjill
Heidi Stone-Schaller
2 +1Fragill
Cilian O'Tuama


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Twiggy


Explanation:
A possibility.

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 00:38
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 213

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Derek Gill Franßen: A good possibility. Have you heard "Spigille" before? I haven't.
1 min

agree  Thomas Bollmann
31 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Spigille


Explanation:
This is just her nickname (Kosename), there is no translation for this. I have once heard of "Spargeltarzan" for skinny persons, but "Spigille"...
;-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2004-08-10 17:06:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I\'ve also heard of \"Zapplesuse\" bzw. \"Zappelphillip\"...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 mins (2004-08-10 17:12:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In my Hochdeutsch-Plattdeutsches Wörterbuch von Günter & Johanna Harte the word \"spillerig\" is given under \"dünn\"; the word \"spillbeent\" under \"dünnbeinig\".

An English version of this could be \"skin and bones\", \"birdlegs\", \"spindlelegs\" or \"spindelshanks\".

Derek Gill Franßen
Germany
Local time: 07:38
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
Thank you so much Derek and all the others. Special thanks to Cilian for the final clarification. You guys were 10 steps ahead of me!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cilian O'Tuama: I reckon the SPI is from SPIndeldürr and the GILLE from Gisela
5 mins
  -> Ah yes, this works well together with my last added note... That there's some darn fine reckoning pardner. ;-)

agree  langnet: "Gille" ist wohl ein Spitzname für "Gisela" (vgl. z.B. Gisela von Burgund (frz. auch Giselle, Gille -> engl. Jill); dazu dialekt. "spiddelig" =dünn, dürr, knochig (http://www.ruhrgebietssprache.de/lexikon/spiddelig.html)
14 mins
  -> Thank you, this is also some good reasoning - "spi..." seems to be a common demoninator.

agree  xxx------: Langnet hat auch Recht.
35 mins
  -> Ja, danke.

agree  Heidi Stone-Schaller: genau, spiddelig, und Gille kommt von Gisela
52 mins
  -> Ja, danke.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Fragill


Explanation:
fragile + Jill = Fragill

braincellstorming

Cilian O'Tuama
Local time: 07:38
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 31

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  langnet: Ja, was mit "Jill", aber "fragile" ist ein bißchen zu "graziös" für "spindeldürr" :-)
5 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Fidjill


Explanation:
as in fidgety and Jill
to go with the second characteristic (hyper)
"jumpy Jill"...

Heidi Stone-Schaller
Local time: 07:38
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 3
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search