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EStreu - in physics of light contexts

English translation: Edisp

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:EStreu
English translation:Edisp
Entered by: Dan McCrosky
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03:51 Jun 16, 2001
German to English translations [PRO]
Science
German term or phrase: EStreu - in physics of light contexts
EStreu – in physics of light contexts

The reference to "rolling shutters" in my previous question was possibly confusing and may have led some physics experts not to answer.

I know what lux and lumen mean, but I do not know what "EStreu" means.

The "E" is possibly not for "Elastizität", that could be more likely for nuclear physics.

In this case, the term is really used in a table of product features for a rolling shutter though.

In this context they are referring to the blackout effectiveness of the shutter and the context is very short:

"Verdunklung: Verdunklungswirkung mittlere Innenbeleuchtungsstärke: EStreu, 1 Lx."

EStreu apparently has something to do with Streuung = ? dispersion ? or ? scatter ? – and perhaps Entfernung = ? distance ? or Energie = ? Energy ? – but I cannot find the English equivalent abbreviation, partly because there are not many Internet references to the German abbreviation.

The term is discussed at this site, but only in German:

http://www.mh-hannover.de/einrichtungen/bpc/lehre/skript/pdf...

In the paper at the site, it also seems to make a difference whether the "Streu" part of the abbreviation is a superscript or a subscript. In my context, it appears to be a subscript.

At the above site, there is also a somewhat complex formula for EStreu that doesn't help me much and cannot be reproduced here.

I have tried writing to the author of the above paper but he either did not wish to answer or did not know the equivalent English expression. My customer also does not know.

Most of the hits for "distance scatter" concern statistical analysis or astronomy so that is possibly not right.

I tried searches for "Escat", "Edisp", "Ddisp" and "Dscat" as well as "E(scat)", "E(disp)", "D(disp)" and "D(scat)" with many hits but none of the results I looked at clearly showed a connection to my rolling shutters.

Any further suggestions?

Thank you,

Dan
Dan McCrosky
Local time: 10:30
E stands for electromagnetic field, Streu is a subscription: Edisp
Explanation:
As stated above, E is the physical abbreviation for "electromagnetic field". "Streu" in this case is a subscription and is a further description of that field, in this case a dispersion field.

I would translate it as followed:
E(subscr.)disp

You probably won't find this expression in any book, because there are quite a lot of subscriptions used for every physical abbreviation. You could use the same subscription with a magnetical field "Bdisp" and it would not be the same or nearly the same. The subscriptions are individually.
Selected response from:

Sonja Tomaskovic
Germany
Local time: 10:30
Grading comment
Since the customer doesn't know either, we will probably get away with Edisp and possibly never know for sure what was really meant. Thank you everyone, including Marcus who answered the other version of this question. Dan
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naEscat
Yves Georges
naEscat or EdispKen Cox
naelastic scattering
Vesna Zivcic
naE stands for electromagnetic field, Streu is a subscription: EdispSonja Tomaskovic


  

Answers


16 mins
E stands for electromagnetic field, Streu is a subscription: Edisp


Explanation:
As stated above, E is the physical abbreviation for "electromagnetic field". "Streu" in this case is a subscription and is a further description of that field, in this case a dispersion field.

I would translate it as followed:
E(subscr.)disp

You probably won't find this expression in any book, because there are quite a lot of subscriptions used for every physical abbreviation. You could use the same subscription with a magnetical field "Bdisp" and it would not be the same or nearly the same. The subscriptions are individually.


    Reference: http://www.mh-hannover.de/einrichtungen/bpc/lehre/skript/pdf...
Sonja Tomaskovic
Germany
Local time: 10:30
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 15
Grading comment
Since the customer doesn't know either, we will probably get away with Edisp and possibly never know for sure what was really meant. Thank you everyone, including Marcus who answered the other version of this question. Dan
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1 hr
elastic scattering


Explanation:
Beam Instrumentation Workshop Posters

... beam with Carbon target. The p-Carbon elastic scattering in the CNI region has a ... with a light sensitivity of ~0.5 m-lux. Light is transported to the ...



    biw00.mit.edu/posters.html
Vesna Zivcic
Local time: 10:30
Native speaker of: Croatian
PRO pts in pair: 571
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5 hrs
Escat or Edisp


Explanation:
I essentially agree with sonyav, except that I would say that it is more likely that the E stands for 'Energie' than for 'e.m. field (strength)'. However, if you just use the E with a subscript in the translation, this doesn't matter. The 'Streu' can be translated as either 'dispersed' or 'scattered', and here the difference in the meaning is not all that great. In vernacular English usage, 'scattered' would more likely be used to refer to light that penetrates a roller shutter, but I'm not sure if there's a common term in technical usage (no obvious hits on Google, and Germans are a lot more methodical about this sort of thing.)

Ken Cox
Local time: 10:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 5905
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1 day 11 hrs
Escat


Explanation:
First of all you speak about rolling shutters. These are used in photography to expose the film at the correct value. The principle works as follows:

The shutter is composed of two rectangular masking pieces which can move apart from each other leaving in the center a variable width opening(just like standard curtains opening in the middle). The shutter is very close and parallel to the film.
Normally the shutter is closed, so when you take the photograph, it opens and closes again after a certain time.

The speed at which it opens and closes must be very high in comparison to the time it stays open because otherwise the center would stay significantly longer exposed.
To overcome that problem the rolling shutter was invented. It also involves two moving masks. However, it does not open in the middle. When closed one mask is in front of the film, the second is completly off, on the left for example. In this example, when the shutter opens, the first mask goes moves to the right and instead of closing from right to left, the second mask also moves from left to right to mask again the film. After that, the first mask comes back in front of the film and is followed by the second which returns to the left. Both are then ready for another photograph.

In reality for strong light conditions, the second mask starts to move well before the first one has reached the right side: it follows at a short distance creating a slit moving from left to right.

The maximal width of the slit is the size of the picture on the film.

From what you say ("blackout effectiveness of the shutter"), I could understand that this term –Estreu– is used for naming the residual light which goes through the shutter when it is closed.

However, I do not understand it that way, and further more I think that one lux is enough light to kill the film in a few seconds

"Verdunklungswirkung mittlere Innenbeleuchtungsstärke" means for me "Light intensity loss by average internal light intensity".

Therefore I interpret it as follows. From what I exposed at the beginning the shutter is a moving slit. Like every slit it disperses (scatters) a part of the light in all directions. The narrower the slit, the relatively higher is this effect.
I think that "Estreu" if measuring this loss of light, which cannot be used to form the image on the film.
It is spoken of "ligh intensity" which is proportionnal to the energy transported by the light. Therefore I think that E stands for Energy.
I would use scatter rather than disperse because this is the term used in physics to decribe the slit dispersion properties.
Therefore the abbreviation I proposed.

I hope this answer makes sense, I can't be sure because the context is small.




    25 years of instrumentation, from which 10 in optical spectroscopy.
Yves Georges
France
Local time: 10:30
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 185
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