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Diplom-Physikerin

English translation: Leave term in German. Otherwise, M.S. or Diploma in Physics

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Diplom-Physikerin
English translation:Leave term in German. Otherwise, M.S. or Diploma in Physics
Entered by: athena22
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19:18 Oct 8, 2001
German to English translations [Non-PRO]
Science
German term or phrase: Diplom-Physikerin
Degree granted by a German University. How exactly should it be translated?
e.g., M.S. in Physics
Explanation:
I agree with Tom: in a narrative, just paraphrase it. Otherwise, I would suggest the above translation.

For example:

... who holds an M.S. in Physics (or: Master's degree in Ph.)

.... holder of an M.S. in Ph.

In most cases, a German "Diplom-...." corresponds to a Master's degree. In some cases, however, it might just be a "Diploma in Physics" (especially in a UK context).

Look at your source text and then make up your mind - it's your call.

HTH
Selected response from:

Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
Local time: 15:11
Grading comment
Thanks Tom and G2E for a thorough and useful answer!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3graduate physicist
Tom Funke
5Diplom-Physikerin (M.S. in Physics equivalent)
Sven Petersson
5e.g., M.S. in PhysicsWerner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)


  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
graduate physicist


Explanation:
There is no exact English equivalent, though such academic degrees (Diplom-Ingenieur/Kaufmann etc.) are fairly often likened to a master's degree -- i.e. above a bachelor's degree but below a doctorate.

In narrative copy, paraphrase -- for instance as above. When precision is required, use the German form untranslated or abbreviated, either after the name (as in German) -- preferably in combination with the paraphrase in parentheses for explanation).


    a frequent query subject here and on other forums
Tom Funke
Local time: 15:11
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 2419

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
13 mins

agree  Johanna Timm, PhD
1 hr

agree  Hans-Henning Judek
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
e.g., M.S. in Physics


Explanation:
I agree with Tom: in a narrative, just paraphrase it. Otherwise, I would suggest the above translation.

For example:

... who holds an M.S. in Physics (or: Master's degree in Ph.)

.... holder of an M.S. in Ph.

In most cases, a German "Diplom-...." corresponds to a Master's degree. In some cases, however, it might just be a "Diploma in Physics" (especially in a UK context).

Look at your source text and then make up your mind - it's your call.

HTH

Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
Local time: 15:11
PRO pts in pair: 238
Grading comment
Thanks Tom and G2E for a thorough and useful answer!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Diplom-Physikerin (M.S. in Physics equivalent)


Explanation:
Never translate proper names or titles! Provide explanation, when needed, within brackets or as footnote.


    My geriatric brain.
    Common sense.
Sven Petersson
Sweden
Local time: 21:11
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1628
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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