KudoZ home » German to English » History

Gründerzeit/Gründerjahre

English translation: Wilhelmine era (or period)

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Gründerzeit/Gründerjahre
English translation:Wilhelmine era (or period)
Entered by: Jan Liebelt
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

07:07 Mar 24, 2001
German to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - History
German term or phrase: Gründerzeit/Gründerjahre
Can anyone help me with a snappy English translation of the devlish German
term "Gründerzeit" or "Gründerjahre" (Germany post-1870 for the
uninitiated)? It's for a heading, so it needs to be three words maximum (the
dates 1870-1918 will in any case be added in brackets, if that's any help).
Jan Liebelt
France
Local time: 17:02
Wilhelmine era (or period)
Explanation:
This is the standard term used by historians for this period.
Selected response from:

Kevin Fulton
United States
Local time: 11:02
Grading comment
"Wilhelmine Era" is the best answer for my purposes because it explains the ENTIRE period (1870-1918) described, since - as many people have pointed out to me - the Gründerzeit was technically only from 1870 to ~1873.

It also points the reader directly at Germany, whereas Founding Years does not exclusively, and it is like a German equivalent of the British "Edwardian Era" and "Victorian Era".

Leaving the term in German is not useful here because the term is being used in a list of headings on a Web site aimed at non-German non-historians. Therefore a relatively non-technical term is preferable in this case.
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
naPeriod of PromoterismDan McCrosky
naThe Bismarck ReichUschi (Ursula) Walke
naGründerzeit ("Founding Era")Fuad Yahya
naWilhelmine era (or period)Kevin Fulton
naGründerzeit / founding years
Alexander Schleber
naGerman Unification
Bellinda Zabcic
naThe Founding YearsRandi Stenstrop
naPeriod of PromotorismDan McCrosky


  

Answers


11 mins
Period of Promotorism


Explanation:
This is the period of rapid industrial expansion, referred to in many, many references as the Period of Promotorism. I do not know of any "snappier" name. HTH - Dan

Dan McCrosky
Local time: 17:02
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

34 mins
German Unification


Explanation:
Dieser Geschichtszeitraum hat viele Namen. Ich tendiere immer gerne dazu, eher keine direkte Übersetzung einer Überschrift zu machen, sondern eher zu adaptieren. (Macht immer mehr Sinn....)
Also kann man da vielleicht 'German Unification' sagen, oder 'The Second Empire', oder 'The New Course'.
Im Internet findet man sehr gute Hilfen diesbezüglich unter dem Stichwort 'Germany 1870 - 1918'.

Bellinda Zabcic
Spain
Local time: 17:02
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Dierk Seeburg
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

47 mins
The Founding Years


Explanation:
The expression I knew from my university years was Gründerjahre, som I started by making a search for texts in English containing "Gründerjahre" and found this:

The Founding Years (Gründerjahre)", in Dieter K. Buse and Juergen C. Doerr, eds., Encyclopedia of the History of Modern Germany. New York: Garland Press, 1998.

http://gaelnet.stmarys-ca.edu/about.smc/faculty/roper/public...


I also found "the Years of the Founders" in a text of Spanish origin, but somehow this didn't ring true to me.

So I tried a search for Founding Years and got 56 hits, most of which did not refer to Germany. To my mind, so much the better, because this makes it a natural way of expressing this concept in English.

Conclusion: I would definitely say The Founding Years.





    See above
Randi Stenstrop
Local time: 17:02
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Danish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Ulrike Spitzer
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs
Gründerzeit / founding years


Explanation:
I would leave the term untranslated. Put it in quotation marks and maybe add a footnote about what it means. There is no "snappy" translation or comparable term available in English, as this refers to a particular time in German history (1870-1871) and the conditions pertaining at that time. The untranslated term puts the text immediately in its historical context for the historically aware. And the explanation will serve the rest.


Alexander Schleber
Belgium
Local time: 17:02
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs
Wilhelmine era (or period)


Explanation:
This is the standard term used by historians for this period.


    Undergrad degree major in history
Kevin Fulton
United States
Local time: 11:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 14
Grading comment
"Wilhelmine Era" is the best answer for my purposes because it explains the ENTIRE period (1870-1918) described, since - as many people have pointed out to me - the Gründerzeit was technically only from 1870 to ~1873.

It also points the reader directly at Germany, whereas Founding Years does not exclusively, and it is like a German equivalent of the British "Edwardian Era" and "Victorian Era".

Leaving the term in German is not useful here because the term is being used in a list of headings on a Web site aimed at non-German non-historians. Therefore a relatively non-technical term is preferable in this case.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs
Period of Promoterism


Explanation:
Sorry, I've just had time to check your question again and the spelling with an "o" is not used as often as the spelling with "e" so "Period of Promoterism" would be more widely known, although if the "o" is used, it does not sound so much like a boxing promoter. See my answer above. - Dan

Dan McCrosky
Local time: 17:02
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs
The Bismarck Reich


Explanation:
This covers the period 1871-1918, also known as the German Empire.
Bismarck was actually dismissed by the emperor William II in 1890 and died in 1898.
However the whole period (1871-1918)is headed 'The Bismarck Reich' in a book called 'facts about German' published by the Press and Information Office of the Federal Government.

Whilst an emperium, Germany was ruled by Bismarck, the iron chancellor, or the chancellor with the iron fist for 19 years.
He laid the foundations of todays Germany.
Geographically, except Poland and Lithuania, Germany's borders are almost the same, he introduced the social structure still in existence.(political move caused by the French Revolution).

Those were the 'Foundation Years'. in short.

Uschi (Ursula) Walke
Local time: 02:02
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

13 hrs
Gründerzeit ("Founding Era")


Explanation:
I would keep the term in its German garb, since it refers to a specific period in a specific setting. I would parenthetically add the phrase "Founding Era" with capital initials, for the sake of clarity ("Founding Period" would be just as fine).

I would do the same for "Gründerjahre," following it with "Founding Years."

That would be my approach, and that is what I suggest.

Fuad


    General translation practice
Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Sep 21, 2015 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
Field (specific)(none) » History
Jan 1, 2006 - Changes made by Fuad Yahya:
FieldOther » Social Sciences


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search