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Nachfalz

English translation: binding flap

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Nachfalz
English translation:binding flap
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12:22 Nov 27, 2000
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
German term or phrase: Nachfalz
This is a printing term.

Nachfalz ist bei der Anlieferung von Beiheften von mind. 6 mm Breite nötig.
Michael Dollman
Local time: 17:50
???????? flap ???????????
Explanation:
uel's answer sounds fine to me, as a non-publisher/printer buuuuuuuuuuut apparently there is also a thing called a "flap".

http://www.otto-schmidt.de/ovs_media/media_808.html

"Einhefter: - 4 Seiten(Heftmitte) DM 438,- pro Tausend. Mindestformat: 305 x 215 mm + 10 mm Nachfalz. Muster vor Auftragsannahme"

http://www.franzkraus.de/arbeiten/klebebin.htm

"Vor - und Nachfalz: - Bei Klebebindungen ist kein Vor- oder Nachfalz nötig!"

The "Vorfalz or Nachfalz" is probably the 5 to 10 mm paper that is necessary to go through the magazine staple ("wire") crease so that the staple will hold the insert. An insert in the front half of the magazine would then logically have a "Nachfalz" and an insert in the second half of the magazine might have a "Vorfalz". It the book or thick journal is not stapled but glued, then no "Vorfalz or Nachfalz" is required or desired.

At these sites the thing is called a "binding flap" which sounds logical and could be used for both " Vorfalz or Nachfalz". As far as I could gather, the verb for actually putting the insert in the magazine is "binding in".

http://www.fei.org/magazine/Ratecard.cfm

http://www.homecenternews.com/market_media_guide/mediakit/ra...

1-page untrimmed (tip-in) 8-3/8" x 11-1/8" - 1-page untrimmed saddlestiched: 8-¼" x 11-18" (plus 3-½" binding flap) - 2-page center spread untrimmed: 16-¼" x 11-1/8" (plus 3" high folio lap)

At the above site they refer to a "flap" AND a "lap". As the term "lap" is used with a 2-page center spread, it would not seem logical that, at least for this magazine, it is the same as "Nachfalz".

In uel's reference:

http://www.marketing.vnu.co.uk/ctg/disploose.html

they also refer to a "lap" with a 2-page spread insert. This, plus all the blah-blah about "high and low folio" (which I think has to do with page numbering), leads me to think that "lap" may have something to do with the fact that pages have increasing real widths the further they are away from the center page, and that for a simple random sized insert, the "Vorfalz or Nachfalz" might be the "flap". I am CERTAINLY NOT sure of any of this because there are too many other terms I do not know, like "guard" and "knock up". The only meaning I know for "knock up" is most likely not what is meant here.

There are some strange differences in the dimensions also, depending on the site/magazine, from your 6mm up to the 75–85mm mentioned for "laps" and "flaps" in the "homecenternews" site above.

Sorry, this has not been at all conclusive, maybe there is a printer out there somewhere who can help - Dan
Selected response from:

Dan McCrosky
Local time: 17:50
Grading comment
Thanks for this detailed account. I chose 'binding flap' in the end.

Thanks too to Ulrike for her useful account.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na???????? flap ???????????Dan McCrosky
nalap or binding lapUlrike Lieder
naafterfolding
Mats Wiman


  

Answers


1 hr
afterfolding


Explanation:
afterfolding is necessary when supplements/inserts/insets/appendices of more than 6 mm thickness are delivered

Mats Wiman
Sweden
Local time: 17:50
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish
PRO pts in pair: 1498

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Dan McCrosky

Ulrike Lieder
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs
lap or binding lap


Explanation:
Muret-Sanders lists the following for Falz, context printing:
a) (eines Druckbogens) - fold
b) (zum Einkleben) - guard, slip fold
c) (der Buchdecke) - joint

Ernst also gives
Falz m (mitgehefteter Papierstreifen) (Buch) / guard, slip fold

However, no hits at all on "slip fold" or "guard" in this context, even though Southern Printers also refers to "guards" in their specs (but the measurements do not jibe).

But the terms "lap" and "binding lap" popped up several times, and that would seem to fit into your context. And Ernst does give
lap (graph) / Falz m

BOUND INSERTS
Maximum size 480mm x 320mm, minimum size 148mm x 105mm. Minimum guard 115mm/lap 10mm. NB if knocking to the head the guard must be on the low folios. If knocking to the tail the guard must be on the high folios. If knocking to the head the lap must be on the high folios and if knocking to the tail, on the low folios..
http://www.newscom.net/southernprint/insertspecs.html


Bound inserts will either "knock up" to the head or foot and be trimmed together with the magazine. Therefore the insert must have the same head/foot trim allowance as the magazine.
If trimming to the head, then a 5mm head trim allowance plus a 10mm binding lap on the highest folio is required. If trimming to the foot then a 5mm foot trim allowance plus a 10mm binding lap on the lowest folio is required. If the insert is the full width of the title then the binding lap will be trimmed off, if not then it will run as part of the insert, so please ensure the design follows on.
http://www.marketing.vnu.co.uk/ctg/disploose.html
www.wilsonandhorton.co.nz/wh_companies/magazines_and_books/...

Don't know if this is much help, but see what you can do with it...
Good luck.



Ulrike Lieder
Local time: 08:50
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 3525
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 hrs
???????? flap ???????????


Explanation:
uel's answer sounds fine to me, as a non-publisher/printer buuuuuuuuuuut apparently there is also a thing called a "flap".

http://www.otto-schmidt.de/ovs_media/media_808.html

"Einhefter: - 4 Seiten(Heftmitte) DM 438,- pro Tausend. Mindestformat: 305 x 215 mm + 10 mm Nachfalz. Muster vor Auftragsannahme"

http://www.franzkraus.de/arbeiten/klebebin.htm

"Vor - und Nachfalz: - Bei Klebebindungen ist kein Vor- oder Nachfalz nötig!"

The "Vorfalz or Nachfalz" is probably the 5 to 10 mm paper that is necessary to go through the magazine staple ("wire") crease so that the staple will hold the insert. An insert in the front half of the magazine would then logically have a "Nachfalz" and an insert in the second half of the magazine might have a "Vorfalz". It the book or thick journal is not stapled but glued, then no "Vorfalz or Nachfalz" is required or desired.

At these sites the thing is called a "binding flap" which sounds logical and could be used for both " Vorfalz or Nachfalz". As far as I could gather, the verb for actually putting the insert in the magazine is "binding in".

http://www.fei.org/magazine/Ratecard.cfm

http://www.homecenternews.com/market_media_guide/mediakit/ra...

1-page untrimmed (tip-in) 8-3/8" x 11-1/8" - 1-page untrimmed saddlestiched: 8-¼" x 11-18" (plus 3-½" binding flap) - 2-page center spread untrimmed: 16-¼" x 11-1/8" (plus 3" high folio lap)

At the above site they refer to a "flap" AND a "lap". As the term "lap" is used with a 2-page center spread, it would not seem logical that, at least for this magazine, it is the same as "Nachfalz".

In uel's reference:

http://www.marketing.vnu.co.uk/ctg/disploose.html

they also refer to a "lap" with a 2-page spread insert. This, plus all the blah-blah about "high and low folio" (which I think has to do with page numbering), leads me to think that "lap" may have something to do with the fact that pages have increasing real widths the further they are away from the center page, and that for a simple random sized insert, the "Vorfalz or Nachfalz" might be the "flap". I am CERTAINLY NOT sure of any of this because there are too many other terms I do not know, like "guard" and "knock up". The only meaning I know for "knock up" is most likely not what is meant here.

There are some strange differences in the dimensions also, depending on the site/magazine, from your 6mm up to the 75–85mm mentioned for "laps" and "flaps" in the "homecenternews" site above.

Sorry, this has not been at all conclusive, maybe there is a printer out there somewhere who can help - Dan


Dan McCrosky
Local time: 17:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1541
Grading comment
Thanks for this detailed account. I chose 'binding flap' in the end.

Thanks too to Ulrike for her useful account.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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