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schleifen (in this special context)

English translation: to raze (sthg. to the ground)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:schleifen (in this special context)
English translation:to raze (sthg. to the ground)
Entered by: kostan
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14:19 Aug 26, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
German term or phrase: schleifen (in this special context)
context: Dresdner Stadtentwässerung (Geschichte)

"Als die Stadtmauern Anfang des 19. Jahrhunderts geschliffen werden, schleust man die Abwässer in die Elbe. Der Beginn der Kanalisation."

When I think of cleaning buildings or town walls, I think of blasting, but I'm afraid that isn't appropriate given the period. I could just use "cleaned" but it doesn't seem descriptive enough. I'm assuming some sort of "scraping" operation involving manual tools. Does anyone have knowledge of this process from that period in history, or have a better suggestion for me than scraping?

TIA, Beth
Beth Kantus
United States
Local time: 10:35
to raze (sthg. to the ground)
Explanation:
see "pons"
The walls of the castle were razed...
Selected response from:

kostan
Austria
Local time: 16:35
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for your help!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +10to pull down, to tear down
pschmitt
4 +3to raze (sthg. to the ground)kostan
5smoothedxxxlone
5Rubbingmergim
4scraped or scraped off
Dr. Fred Thomson


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +10
to pull down, to tear down


Explanation:
Or: "to demolish", which is basically what "schleifen" in this context means.

Hope this helps

pschmitt
Local time: 15:35
PRO pts in pair: 406

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cassandra Greer: niederreissen n. Wahrig
3 mins

agree  Mike McDonald: more specifically 'raze'
4 mins

agree  Kim Metzger: Wow, you learn s.th. every day. Muret-Sanders: mil. (einer Festung) dismantlement.
6 mins

agree  Klaus Herrmann
7 mins

agree  Steffen Pollex
21 mins

agree  Elisabeth Ghysels
23 mins

agree  jccantrell
29 mins

agree  jerrie
1 hr

agree  Chris Rowson: Yes, the old city walls were completely demolished (changing the city significantly be freeing up a lot of space).
2 hrs

agree  xxxsixxxter1
2 hrs
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
smoothed


Explanation:
maybe this will do?

Good luck!


    x
xxxlone
Canada
Local time: 10:35
Native speaker of: Danish
PRO pts in pair: 330
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31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
scraped or scraped off


Explanation:
This might be the cleaning process. It would involve scraping off the accumulations of moss and dirt.

Dr. Fred Thomson
United States
Local time: 08:35
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 5861
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
to raze (sthg. to the ground)


Explanation:
see "pons"
The walls of the castle were razed...

kostan
Austria
Local time: 16:35
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 493
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for your help!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ulrike Lieder: Definitely! Schleifen in this context refers to the fortifications being razed. While "tear down" or "demolish" is certainly not incorrect, "raze" is correct terminus technicus.
22 mins

agree  Wolf Brosius
54 mins

agree  Chris Rowson: Yes, though not the castle walls, they are still there.
1 hr
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Rubbing


Explanation:
Pressure and friction on the walls using also water.

mergim
United States
Local time: 10:35
PRO pts in pair: 7

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Kim Metzger: Rubbing the walls? I don't think so.
26 mins
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