KudoZ home » German to English » Tech/Engineering

rechtsgipflige Verteilung

English translation: Notes on distributions - see explanation below

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
07:03 Dec 20, 2000
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
German term or phrase: rechtsgipflige Verteilung
Another statistics problem!
My text reads: Während der Median eine Verteilung definitionsgemäß in zwei gleiche Teile teilt, liegt z.B. bei einer negativ schiefen Verteilung (d.h. einer sogenannten rechtsgipfligen Verteilung ) der arithmetische Mittelwert niedriger und das Dichtemittel D höher als der Median."
I know that when talking about the shape of data, the distribution is referred to as symmetrical or having zero-skewness if the mean and the median are equal. However, from my study of statistics I also know that negative skew, where the mean is < than the median is called left-skewness. I suspect that the German text is referring to this using "right" because the preponderence of data (the "Gipfel" so to speak) would be seen on the right side of a dot scale going from left to right in ascending order.
The literal side of me is having a problem translating rechtsgipflig as left-skewed. Does anyone know of another term in English for rechtsgipflige Verteilung that might help me around this problem?
Beth Kantus
United States
Local time: 22:44
English translation:Notes on distributions - see explanation below
Explanation:
Dear Beth
I have a German stats textbook and an English stats book in front of me.
They both have various illustrations of distributions. In each there is a distribution which has:
(1) a tail on the left and the hump on the right. In English the caption says "unimodal, skewed to the left" ("negatively skewed" in another textbook)and in German it says "rechtssteile Verteilung";
(2) a tail on the right and the hump on the left. In English it is "unimodal, skewed to the right" ("positively skewed")and in German "linkssteile Verteilung".

I would say that rechtsteilig = rechtsgipfelig for graphic reasons.

Hope this helps - Michael (alias Bilby)
Selected response from:

Michael Grunwald
Local time: 11:44
Grading comment
Thanks to both of you for your help, especially to Michael for the research. (Is it really called a "hump"?) Normally, I would say Nancy is right - who cares what the source text says, but unfortunately I'm translating for people who read and know German, so I'm liable to be asked for an explantion why I wrote left instead of right. Too bad I'm not cooking pork chops! :-) Someone else answered me outside this forum with actually a very good suggestion (right-weighted distribution), even though that pesky "right" is still in there. I followed Michael's lead and dug out my own college textbook on statistics and found another description of this data shape as "clustering on the high end (or right side) of the scale." In the end I decided to call it left-skewed, but added an explanatory note in parentheses. Should probably have thought of that solution earlier! Thanks again for your help.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
naNotes on distributions - see explanation below
Michael Grunwald
nayou got itNancy Schmeing


  

Answers


3 hrs
you got it


Explanation:
Beth, your explanations are fully consistent, and I don't think there's anything you don't know about this passage. So remember that, as Julia Child used to say when a pork chop hit the floor, "No one will ever know". The people reading the English don't care what it used to say in German, do they?
Best wishes, Nancy

Nancy Schmeing
Canada
Local time: 22:44
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 328
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

15 hrs
Notes on distributions - see explanation below


Explanation:
Dear Beth
I have a German stats textbook and an English stats book in front of me.
They both have various illustrations of distributions. In each there is a distribution which has:
(1) a tail on the left and the hump on the right. In English the caption says "unimodal, skewed to the left" ("negatively skewed" in another textbook)and in German it says "rechtssteile Verteilung";
(2) a tail on the right and the hump on the left. In English it is "unimodal, skewed to the right" ("positively skewed")and in German "linkssteile Verteilung".

I would say that rechtsteilig = rechtsgipfelig for graphic reasons.

Hope this helps - Michael (alias Bilby)


    Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (2nd Ed.) - Welkowitz, Ewen & Cohen
    Statistik fuer Sozialwissenschaftler - Bortz
Michael Grunwald
Local time: 11:44
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 40
Grading comment
Thanks to both of you for your help, especially to Michael for the research. (Is it really called a "hump"?) Normally, I would say Nancy is right - who cares what the source text says, but unfortunately I'm translating for people who read and know German, so I'm liable to be asked for an explantion why I wrote left instead of right. Too bad I'm not cooking pork chops! :-) Someone else answered me outside this forum with actually a very good suggestion (right-weighted distribution), even though that pesky "right" is still in there. I followed Michael's lead and dug out my own college textbook on statistics and found another description of this data shape as "clustering on the high end (or right side) of the scale." In the end I decided to call it left-skewed, but added an explanatory note in parentheses. Should probably have thought of that solution earlier! Thanks again for your help.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search