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Festnetz

English translation: landline or fixed network

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Festnetz
English translation:landline or fixed network
Entered by: Dan McCrosky
Options:
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03:20 Jan 2, 2001
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
German term or phrase: Festnetz
when festnetz is used as the "opposite" of mobile what is the usual american english term?
landline, PSTN, fixed network, standard phone?
i.e. "gespraech wird ueber mobilfunk- oder festnetz weitergeleitet"
"landline" is becoming established in colloquial british english.
Iain Mackenzie
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:58
"landline" or "fixed line"
Explanation:
Ferretti – Wörterbuch der Datentechnik shows "fixed network" or "fixed-lines network" for "Festnetz".

AltaVista (English) search results:

"landline" = 15,000 – many British and many not pertinent

"+landline -.uk -.au -.ca" = 8000 hits, mostly pertinent, mostly US, many consumer oriented

"fixed network" = 7,000 but higher pertinence than the "landline" hits

"+`fixed network´ -.uk -.au -.ca = 5,500 extremely pertinent, mostly technical sites, some non-US

"fixed-lines network" = 4 hits from France, Myanmar, Singapore and Senegal

"fixed-line network" = 500 hits from sites mostly outside the UK and US.

"wire network" = 1400 mostly US

"PSTN" = Public Switched Telephone Network = 36,000 hits, but there may be several problems with PSTN in that it could also include mobile telephones for some people. For the UK, this site shows them as mutually exclusive:

http://ftp.option.com/FAQ/faq21.htm

Configuration For Use on GSM + PSTN networks - Do I need to alter any modem settings in my data communications and/or fax software when swapping cables to use my Option modem on the Telkom or GSM networks? No! The Option 2-in-1 modem automatically detects whether it is connected to a GSM cellphone or Telkom fixed-line. Just swap cables. You must however have data/fax services enabled on your cellular subscription to dial out and receive in GSM mode. This is a once-off requirement.

This site equates PSTN to POTS:

http://home.ubalt.edu/abento/650/phone/tsld002.htm

This 3com site says PSTN must be analog, which would exclude my ISDN landline????????????

http://www.3com.com/nsc/glossary/publicswitchedtelephonenetw...

"The worldwide standard analog telecommunications system"

In contrast to 3com, this UK site shows PSTN including everything:

http://www-ics.ee.ic.ac.uk/surp98/report/ajh8/xDSL-fr-ch1.ht...

Besides that, there are many analog mobile networks, especially in the US. This US site does not definitely exclude mobile telephony when discussing PSTN:

http://www.sba.oakland.edu/mis405/411-5a/sld007.htm

This glossary site shows PSTN as a synonym for "landline":

http://wirelessadvisor.com/glossary.cfm#MTSO

Whatis?com (normally quite good) does not mention mobile under PSTN:

http://whatis.techtarget.com/WhatIs_Definition_Page/0,4152,2...

"The PSTN (public switched telephone network) refers to the world's collection of interconnected voice-oriented public telephone networks, both commercial and government-owned. It's also referred to as the Plain Old Telephone Service (plain old telephone service). It's the aggregation of circuit-switching telephone networks that has evolved from the days of Alexander Graham Bell ("Doctor Watson, come here!"). Today, it is almost entirely digital in technology except for the final link from the central (local) telephone office to the user. "

"Plain old telephone service: POTS is a term sometimes used in discussion of new telephone technologies in which the question of whether and how existing voice transmission for ordinary phone communication can be accommodated. For example, Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line and Integrated Services Digital Network provide some part of their channels for "plain old telephone service" while providing most of their bandwidth for digital data transmission."

This Verizon (Bell Atlantic) site shows "landline" as a definite opposite to "wireless":

http://www.bellatlantic.com/jobpost/avail.htm

"This organization oversees the corporation's overseas investments in wireless and landline operations around the globe. Positions may require significant international travel."

With all the questions concerning PSTN, either "landline" or "fixed network" sound safer, simpler and easier for everyone to understand.

HTH - Dan
Selected response from:

Dan McCrosky
Local time: 11:58
Grading comment
How can you afford the time to give such detailed answers to every question?
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na"landline" or "fixed network"Dan McCrosky
na"landline" or "fixed line"Dan McCrosky
nalandlineBeth Kantus


  

Answers


11 mins
landline


Explanation:
my cellular provider (Verizon Wireless, formerly Bell Atlantic Mobile) calls it landline.
Reference from my "customer information overview":
Landline Charges: The landline charge is our handling fee that you incur when you place a cellular call that is processed through a local telephone company. This charge aplies to calls connected to a landline telephone number, a pager or to a cellular phone not on our network. ....

HTH, Beth!

Beth Kantus
United States
Local time: 05:58
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 924
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs
"landline" or "fixed line"


Explanation:
Ferretti – Wörterbuch der Datentechnik shows "fixed network" or "fixed-lines network" for "Festnetz".

AltaVista (English) search results:

"landline" = 15,000 – many British and many not pertinent

"+landline -.uk -.au -.ca" = 8000 hits, mostly pertinent, mostly US, many consumer oriented

"fixed network" = 7,000 but higher pertinence than the "landline" hits

"+`fixed network´ -.uk -.au -.ca = 5,500 extremely pertinent, mostly technical sites, some non-US

"fixed-lines network" = 4 hits from France, Myanmar, Singapore and Senegal

"fixed-line network" = 500 hits from sites mostly outside the UK and US.

"wire network" = 1400 mostly US

"PSTN" = Public Switched Telephone Network = 36,000 hits, but there may be several problems with PSTN in that it could also include mobile telephones for some people. For the UK, this site shows them as mutually exclusive:

http://ftp.option.com/FAQ/faq21.htm

Configuration For Use on GSM + PSTN networks - Do I need to alter any modem settings in my data communications and/or fax software when swapping cables to use my Option modem on the Telkom or GSM networks? No! The Option 2-in-1 modem automatically detects whether it is connected to a GSM cellphone or Telkom fixed-line. Just swap cables. You must however have data/fax services enabled on your cellular subscription to dial out and receive in GSM mode. This is a once-off requirement.

This site equates PSTN to POTS:

http://home.ubalt.edu/abento/650/phone/tsld002.htm

This 3com site says PSTN must be analog, which would exclude my ISDN landline????????????

http://www.3com.com/nsc/glossary/publicswitchedtelephonenetw...

"The worldwide standard analog telecommunications system"

In contrast to 3com, this UK site shows PSTN including everything:

http://www-ics.ee.ic.ac.uk/surp98/report/ajh8/xDSL-fr-ch1.ht...

Besides that, there are many analog mobile networks, especially in the US. This US site does not definitely exclude mobile telephony when discussing PSTN:

http://www.sba.oakland.edu/mis405/411-5a/sld007.htm

This glossary site shows PSTN as a synonym for "landline":

http://wirelessadvisor.com/glossary.cfm#MTSO

Whatis?com (normally quite good) does not mention mobile under PSTN:

http://whatis.techtarget.com/WhatIs_Definition_Page/0,4152,2...

"The PSTN (public switched telephone network) refers to the world's collection of interconnected voice-oriented public telephone networks, both commercial and government-owned. It's also referred to as the Plain Old Telephone Service (plain old telephone service). It's the aggregation of circuit-switching telephone networks that has evolved from the days of Alexander Graham Bell ("Doctor Watson, come here!"). Today, it is almost entirely digital in technology except for the final link from the central (local) telephone office to the user. "

"Plain old telephone service: POTS is a term sometimes used in discussion of new telephone technologies in which the question of whether and how existing voice transmission for ordinary phone communication can be accommodated. For example, Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line and Integrated Services Digital Network provide some part of their channels for "plain old telephone service" while providing most of their bandwidth for digital data transmission."

This Verizon (Bell Atlantic) site shows "landline" as a definite opposite to "wireless":

http://www.bellatlantic.com/jobpost/avail.htm

"This organization oversees the corporation's overseas investments in wireless and landline operations around the globe. Positions may require significant international travel."

With all the questions concerning PSTN, either "landline" or "fixed network" sound safer, simpler and easier for everyone to understand.

HTH - Dan


Dan McCrosky
Local time: 11:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1541
Grading comment
How can you afford the time to give such detailed answers to every question?
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs
"landline" or "fixed network"


Explanation:
Sorry, the answer above was supposed to read "fixed network" not "fixed line".

Dan

Dan McCrosky
Local time: 11:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1541
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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