KudoZ home » German to English » Tech/Engineering

Gesellenprüfung

English translation: Final Traineeship Examination (or Final Professional Training Examination)

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Gesellenprüfung (Zahntechniker)
English translation:Final Traineeship Examination (or Final Professional Training Examination)
Entered by: Dan McCrosky
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

11:05 Feb 7, 2001
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
German term or phrase: Gesellenprüfung
in order to obtain the "Gesellen=Prüfungszeugnis" he passed the "Gesellenprüfung im Zahntechniker=Handwerk" in 1955.
Gregory Mehrten
United States
Local time: 05:40
Final Traineeship Examination (or Final Professional Training Examination)
Explanation:
It is always hard to translate a term for which the meaning does not really exist in the other language. We use the term "apprentices" for occupational trainees who work, at least to some extent, with their hands and "trainees" for occupational trainees whose occupational work is less manual, but this difference is more traditional than realistic. Even in Germany, the term "Lehrling" is dead but not buried. "Auszubildende" = "Azubi" is now politically correct.

We can translate the name for the person:

Lehrling = Auszubildende = Azubi = trainee or apprentice

Geselle = Fach****mann/frau = journeyperson = trained ****

Meister****er/in = master ****

and the name of the training program:

Lehre = Ausbildung = apprenticeship = traineeship

Meisterprüfungslehrgang = Master course

and the relationships (even though we normally don't in English):

The Auszubildende becomes the Geselle becomes the Meister

The apprentice becomes the journeyman becomes the master

and the examinations must then be called:

Meisterprüfung = Master's Final Examination or Final Master's Examination

Gesellenprüfung = Apprentice's/Trainee's Final Examination (Langenscheidts Großwörterbuch – Der Kleine Muret-Sanders)

or Trade Test (Hamblock/Wessels – Großwörterbuch Wirtschaftsenglisch)

or Final Apprenticeship/Traineeship Examination or Tradesman's Qualifying Examination (Romain – Wörterbuch der Rechts- und Wirtschaftssprache)

or Final Professional Training Examination (me, because there is probably no such thing as a Master Dental Technician in English)

I would capitalize whatever you decide as a name to try to give it the importance it really has in Germany. For most people, the English term "tradesman" is quite limited to only a few occupations (definitely not including dental technicians) and it is almost never used in the US, so one of the other more explanatory names would probably be better.

Another problem in your phrase is the difference between the "Gesellenbrief" and the "Gesellenprüfungszeugnis". The "Gesellenbrief" is the certificate that says a person is qualified to call her/himself a journeyperson/trained ****. The "Gesellenprüfungszeugnis" is the official statement of marks obtained in the various parts of the final examination (3 – 7 parts). The "Gesellenbrief" is a result of passing marks and is not issued if the average of the partial marks is too low. If the marks are too low, it may also be that the "Gesellenprüfungszeugnis" as such is not issued either, perhaps just a letter with a list of the marks. Most people speak of a "Gasellenbrief" or "Meisterbrief" and do not mention the "Gesellenprüfungszeugnis" or "Meisterprüfungszeugnis" unless the prospective employer wants to see where the candidate's strong and weak points are. It may be that your author means "Gasellenbrief", not "Gesellenprüfungszeugnis", but you have to translate what is in front of you.

I do not understand the use of "=" signs in your question phrase, hyphens would seem more natural.

"… in order to obtain the "Gesellen-Prüfungszeugnis" he passed the "Gesellenprüfung im Zahntechniker-Handwerk" in 1955 …"

=

"… in order to obtain the Final Traineeship Examination Results Certificate ("Gesellen-Prüfungszeugnis") he passed the Final Traineeship Examination (or Final Professional Training Examination) for the profession of Dental Technician ("Gesellenprüfung im Zahntechniker-Handwerk") in 1955 …"

if indeed the "Gasellenbrief" is meant, then:

"… in order to obtain the Trained Dental Technician Certificate ("Gesellenbrief") he passed the Final Traineeship Examination (or Final Professional Training Examination) for the profession of Dental Technician ("Gesellenprüfung im Zahntechniker-Handwerk") in 1955 …"

The word "Handwerk" should probably not be translated at all because we would then be back to the problem with "tradesman" or "trade". I do not think we would ever use the terms "apprentice", "apprenticeship" or "journeyman" in English to refer to a dental technician

Further references: experience as an "Ausbilder" in a German "Ausbildungsbetrieb", passed "Ausbildereignungsprüfung", passed "Gesellenprüfung", passed "Meisterprüfung", possess a "Gesellenbrief" and a "Meisterbrief".

HTH - Dan
Selected response from:

Dan McCrosky
Local time: 11:40
Grading comment
Thank you for your comments.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
naapprentices' final/qualifying examinationMarkling
naFinal Traineeship Examination (or Final Professional Training Examination)Dan McCrosky
naapprenticeship exam
Dierk Seeburg
nafinal apprenticeship examination
Alexander Schleber


  

Answers


15 mins
final apprenticeship examination


Explanation:
There are severla possibilities here, according to the Oxford Duden. It is (1) an "examination to become a journeyman". However, this is rather old style, referring usdually to handworker trades.
(2) "apprentice's final examination", which I have turned around a little, to give it less of a definition and more of a formal character.


    Oxford Duden
Alexander Schleber
Belgium
Local time: 11:40
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2340
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

15 mins
apprenticeship exam


Explanation:
I don't think "journeyman" fits in this context (;->), but try "apprentice[ship] exam" (http://wctclnx.waukesha.tec.wi.us/wctc/student/lp/trades.htm... reading as a whole "in order to obtain the apprenticeship certificate he passed the apprenticeship exam in dental technology [http://www.nscc.ns.ca/programs/DentalTechnology.html] in 1995".

Cheerio,
Dierk


    Reference: http://dict.leo.org/?lang=en&where=0&search=geselle
    Reference: http://www.iee.et.tu-dresden.de/cgi-bin/cgiwrap/wernerr/sear...
Dierk Seeburg
Local time: 03:40
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 404
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
Final Traineeship Examination (or Final Professional Training Examination)


Explanation:
It is always hard to translate a term for which the meaning does not really exist in the other language. We use the term "apprentices" for occupational trainees who work, at least to some extent, with their hands and "trainees" for occupational trainees whose occupational work is less manual, but this difference is more traditional than realistic. Even in Germany, the term "Lehrling" is dead but not buried. "Auszubildende" = "Azubi" is now politically correct.

We can translate the name for the person:

Lehrling = Auszubildende = Azubi = trainee or apprentice

Geselle = Fach****mann/frau = journeyperson = trained ****

Meister****er/in = master ****

and the name of the training program:

Lehre = Ausbildung = apprenticeship = traineeship

Meisterprüfungslehrgang = Master course

and the relationships (even though we normally don't in English):

The Auszubildende becomes the Geselle becomes the Meister

The apprentice becomes the journeyman becomes the master

and the examinations must then be called:

Meisterprüfung = Master's Final Examination or Final Master's Examination

Gesellenprüfung = Apprentice's/Trainee's Final Examination (Langenscheidts Großwörterbuch – Der Kleine Muret-Sanders)

or Trade Test (Hamblock/Wessels – Großwörterbuch Wirtschaftsenglisch)

or Final Apprenticeship/Traineeship Examination or Tradesman's Qualifying Examination (Romain – Wörterbuch der Rechts- und Wirtschaftssprache)

or Final Professional Training Examination (me, because there is probably no such thing as a Master Dental Technician in English)

I would capitalize whatever you decide as a name to try to give it the importance it really has in Germany. For most people, the English term "tradesman" is quite limited to only a few occupations (definitely not including dental technicians) and it is almost never used in the US, so one of the other more explanatory names would probably be better.

Another problem in your phrase is the difference between the "Gesellenbrief" and the "Gesellenprüfungszeugnis". The "Gesellenbrief" is the certificate that says a person is qualified to call her/himself a journeyperson/trained ****. The "Gesellenprüfungszeugnis" is the official statement of marks obtained in the various parts of the final examination (3 – 7 parts). The "Gesellenbrief" is a result of passing marks and is not issued if the average of the partial marks is too low. If the marks are too low, it may also be that the "Gesellenprüfungszeugnis" as such is not issued either, perhaps just a letter with a list of the marks. Most people speak of a "Gasellenbrief" or "Meisterbrief" and do not mention the "Gesellenprüfungszeugnis" or "Meisterprüfungszeugnis" unless the prospective employer wants to see where the candidate's strong and weak points are. It may be that your author means "Gasellenbrief", not "Gesellenprüfungszeugnis", but you have to translate what is in front of you.

I do not understand the use of "=" signs in your question phrase, hyphens would seem more natural.

"… in order to obtain the "Gesellen-Prüfungszeugnis" he passed the "Gesellenprüfung im Zahntechniker-Handwerk" in 1955 …"

=

"… in order to obtain the Final Traineeship Examination Results Certificate ("Gesellen-Prüfungszeugnis") he passed the Final Traineeship Examination (or Final Professional Training Examination) for the profession of Dental Technician ("Gesellenprüfung im Zahntechniker-Handwerk") in 1955 …"

if indeed the "Gasellenbrief" is meant, then:

"… in order to obtain the Trained Dental Technician Certificate ("Gesellenbrief") he passed the Final Traineeship Examination (or Final Professional Training Examination) for the profession of Dental Technician ("Gesellenprüfung im Zahntechniker-Handwerk") in 1955 …"

The word "Handwerk" should probably not be translated at all because we would then be back to the problem with "tradesman" or "trade". I do not think we would ever use the terms "apprentice", "apprenticeship" or "journeyman" in English to refer to a dental technician

Further references: experience as an "Ausbilder" in a German "Ausbildungsbetrieb", passed "Ausbildereignungsprüfung", passed "Gesellenprüfung", passed "Meisterprüfung", possess a "Gesellenbrief" and a "Meisterbrief".

HTH - Dan


Dan McCrosky
Local time: 11:40
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1541
Grading comment
Thank you for your comments.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Andy Lemminger

profile removed

Uschi (Ursula) Walke
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs
apprentices' final/qualifying examination


Explanation:
self explanatory

Markling
Local time: 04:40
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search